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Old 29-04-2012, 11:57   #1
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Replacing Chainplates on the Water

We have bought a new boat that is sitting in Mexico (we are far, far away at the moment), and we are trying to figure out the best way to go about replacing the chainplates when we get down there. The work yard fees are very steep, so we're wondering if we can take off one chainplate at a time, take it to the machine shop to duplicate, and bring back to reinstall a few days later. We're hoping to do this while on the water, tied to the dock, and not pay the work yard fees. We would of course use the halyard for temporary support on the stay or shroud that is down at the moment. Is this a reasonable approach, given that we could get big winds and rock around at dock. We've read in other threads of people doing this, but I've been unclear if they were on the water or on the hard. Thanks

Oh yeah, it's a Pearson Triton (deck stepped mast) that has 6 shrouds, 2 chainplates on the backstay, and a bowsprit with two chainplates for the whisker stays and a stem fitting for the bobstay (11 total pieces to replace)
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Old 29-04-2012, 12:13   #2
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Re: Replacing Chainplates on the Water

i did mine in water in san diego. isnt gonna sink boat to do them. i removed one side and did them , while using a cleat for the affixment of the loose ends of shrouds for position of mast.
take one shroud and replace, then take next shroud and replace. do this until all are replaced. then tune rig. ta daa--magic--is good.
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Old 29-04-2012, 12:30   #3
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Re: Replacing Chainplates on the Water

1) the boat being Triton (the mast being small and light) why not unstep the mast and replace all the plates at once - you will save time (if this counts),

2) if the mast is securely held in place by the lowers (these can be 2x2 or 2+1) then it is secure to remove all the tops.

3) in our boat (deck stepped mast, 2 lowers each side, 1 top, 2 forestays and 2 backs) it is secure to be at the dock with the lowers ONLY. It is also secure to be at the dock with the tops (in all directions) only. In the latter case we do not (over) tension the tops.

4) talking a dock in the marina, not one in a commercial place with tugs and pilot boats steaming by!

b.
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Old 29-04-2012, 13:09   #4
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Re: Replacing Chainplates on the Water

Quote:
Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
1) the boat being Triton (the mast being small and light) why not unstep the mast and replace all the plates at once - you will save time (if this counts),

2) if the mast is securely held in place by the lowers (these can be 2x2 or 2+1) then it is secure to remove all the tops.

3) in our boat (deck stepped mast, 2 lowers each side, 1 top, 2 forestays and 2 backs) it is secure to be at the dock with the lowers ONLY. It is also secure to be at the dock with the tops (in all directions) only. In the latter case we do not (over) tension the tops.

4) talking a dock in the marina, not one in a commercial place with tugs and pilot boats steaming by!

b.
Yeah, no problem in the water. You can certainly do more than one at a time also. No way to get the chainplate dimensions prior to going down?
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Old 29-04-2012, 13:10   #5
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Re: Replacing Chainplates on the Water

Quote:
Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
1) the boat being Triton (the mast being small and light) why not unstep the mast and replace all the plates at once - you will save time (if this counts),

2) if the mast is securely held in place by the lowers (these can be 2x2 or 2+1) then it is secure to remove all the tops.

3) in our boat (deck stepped mast, 2 lowers each side, 1 top, 2 forestays and 2 backs) it is secure to be at the dock with the lowers ONLY. It is also secure to be at the dock with the tops (in all directions) only. In the latter case we do not (over) tension the tops.

4) talking a dock in the marina, not one in a commercial place with tugs and pilot boats steaming by!

b.
Yeah, What B. said. no problem in the water. You can certainly do more than one at a time also. No way to get the chainplate dimensions prior to going down?
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Old 29-04-2012, 15:44   #6
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Re: Replacing Chainplates on the Water

Cheehako- We might be able to ask the previous owner to go to the yard and take measurements, however, we have been cautioned to take the actual part to the machinist, so as to make certain of an identical copy. We might take your advice and do two at a time, though.

Barnakiel- We're going to price out what it would cost to take the mast up and down, but if we can do it all from the water (for free), we'll probably go that route. Time is less of an essence than dollars at this point.

Thanks all for the replies, this is the peace of mind we were hoping to get here.
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Old 29-04-2012, 15:49   #7
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Re: Replacing Chainplates on the Water

It all depends, but at times it is better to use the old ones as templates - you may want the holes to exactly match the old pattern.

!!! If so, clearly mark them so that later you place them in their proper slots (applicable only if you replace a couple of them at a time) !!!

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Old 29-04-2012, 16:21   #8
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Re: Replacing Chainplates on the Water

good points all! I think we definitely want to go the template route. Thanks again.
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Old 29-04-2012, 17:39   #9
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Re: Replacing Chainplates on the Water

On a 28 footer a few strong hands might get it down without hiring it out..... if you think it through....
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Old 01-05-2012, 11:37   #10
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Re: Replacing Chainplates on the Water

Hi Controlled

With a small boat like yours, two or three hands should have no problem taking down a deck stepped mast. I dropped mine on a 27' Vega by myself but it's just 30 feet. Just use a little planning, consider winds, where it's going, anything it may hit, maybe some cushions, and other things in your location.

Simple instructions: Make sure your tied up good. Secure all lines to mast. Use boom as gin pole, your vang as tackle. Remove lowers, loosen up the tops some. Let go back stay and lower away.

As I said simple instructions, much will depend on your boat and your location. Oh and lookout for ELECTRICAL WIRES OVERHEAD and in the mast. I know there are seldom overhead wires in marinas but just to be on the safe side. A hardhat doesn't hurt either.

Good luck
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