Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 09-12-2010, 13:00   #31
Freelance Delivery Skipper..
 
boatman61's Avatar

Community Sponsor
Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: UK/Portugal
Posts: 20,209
Images: 2
Send a message via Skype™ to boatman61
pirate

Beneteau's tend to be to Port... at least the 35ft unders in the Oceanis range.. and I think Bavaria's..
Some designs had them central at the back of the cabin with part of the worktop as the final step into the cockpit...
__________________


Born To Be Wild
boatman61 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2010, 13:17   #32
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: The boat lives at Fidalgo Island, PNW
Boat: 36' custom steel
Posts: 992
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt sachs View Post
Why is the galley supposed to be on the port side? .....let the newby jokes begin...:-)
Because you can heave-to on a starboard tack thereby generally maintaining the right of way while preparing meals down below. It's easier to prepare meals if the galley is downhill from the cook, versus uphill from the cook.
__________________

__________________
John, sailing a custom 36' double-headed steel sloop--a 2001 derivation of a 1976 Ted Brewer design.
Hiracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2010, 13:22   #33
Freelance Delivery Skipper..
 
boatman61's Avatar

Community Sponsor
Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: UK/Portugal
Posts: 20,209
Images: 2
Send a message via Skype™ to boatman61
pirate

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hiracer View Post
Because you can heave-to on a starboard tack thereby generally maintaining the right of way while preparing meals down below. It's easier to prepare meals if the galley is downhill from the cook, versus uphill from the cook.
And if its on the Stbd side you can Heave-to on a Port tack and the gally will be 'downhill..'
Being left or right handed has nothing whatsoever to do with it
__________________


Born To Be Wild
boatman61 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2010, 13:32   #34
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: The boat lives at Fidalgo Island, PNW
Boat: 36' custom steel
Posts: 992
Quote:
Originally Posted by boatman61 View Post
And if its on the Stbd side you can Heave-to on a Port tack and the gally will be 'downhill..'
Being left or right handed has nothing whatsoever to do with it
But port tack is the give-way boat. You've lost your right of way. To maintain right of way, you would have to cook with the galley on the uphill side.

If you solo, or your crew is asleep or disabled, avoiding a tack in the middle of meal preparation is not a big deal, but it is a PITA to consider. A good designer considers it. He puts the galley where it belongs, port side.
__________________
John, sailing a custom 36' double-headed steel sloop--a 2001 derivation of a 1976 Ted Brewer design.
Hiracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2010, 14:18   #35
cat herder, extreme blacksheep
 
zeehag's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: furycame alley , tropics, mexico for now
Boat: 1976 FORMOSA yankee clipper 41
Posts: 17,770
Images: 56
Send a message via Yahoo to zeehag Send a message via Skype™ to zeehag
my galley is on stbd side.. is spozed to be a cruising boat-- i love generalizations..LOL toilet is on port side--usually i have seen this offset-- galley one side head the other. balances the boat?? LOL
if you are spozedly cruising, who tacks anyway unless ye are trying to head into a harbor or some other thing--thenye wait until the boat is secured for cooking.
my boat sits upright when heaving to--nice n heavy.
if wind suddenly changes during meal prep, then the weather watch was poorly planned. is no such thing as emergency tack while cruising--unless a tug n tow appear out of nowhere at ye. then your regular watch was defective, and watch keeper needs glasses.
(omg!! i am in trouble now!!)
and location of galley does NOT define the designer. lol this is CRUISING not RACING. big difference.
my boat is WM GARDEN design. i noticed PERRY also does stbd side galleys...so they are bad designers???
ROFL.
zeehag is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2010, 14:28   #36
Registered User
 
Auspicious's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Boat: HR 40
Posts: 1,793
Send a message via Skype™ to Auspicious
In my mind the biggest issue is how you plan to use the boat.

If your longest legs are 24 to 36(ish) hours than pre-made food will work fine. If you are really making passages then the idea of surviving on finger food is really truly unwise.

What has worked for me on a longer passage is a combination of foods made up ahead and frozen (even without a freezer, you can use frozen foods to help keep a cooler chilled) and meals cooked on the fly. In cold weather a couple of hot meals a day make a big difference. One a day is fine in warm weather.

I personally prefer U-shaped galleys, but have been quite content with other configurations. It depends on the boat. I cranked all kinds of food out of a linear galley on a Swan 46 a couple of years ago. I found that no matter which tack we were on there was always something to wedge against or press a hip against. On other boats, the galley may be a U but the places you need to stand to prep may not have anywhere to lean against.

In my opinion you should be able to produce a good variety of healthy and filling food in any sea and be able to entertain nicely at anchor. If you can do that, the configuration per se is not important. That said, in my experience there are more U-shaped galleys than not that allow for that. A linear galley is not a non-starter if you can wedge in.
__________________
S/V Auspicious
AuspiciousWorks
Beware cut and paste sailors
Auspicious is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2010, 14:38   #37
cat herder, extreme blacksheep
 
zeehag's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: furycame alley , tropics, mexico for now
Boat: 1976 FORMOSA yankee clipper 41
Posts: 17,770
Images: 56
Send a message via Yahoo to zeehag Send a message via Skype™ to zeehag
wedging in isnt as important as standing upright and being able to cook. premade meals arent an option for many cruisers. they are a definite LUXURY.
kinda up there with restaurant meals.cost prohibitive and not with decent ingredients, many have so many chemicals in them as to be inedible. is why they last so long.LOL. home cooked is waaay more enjoyable. if one hasnt an oven., premade meals are a definite IMpossibility.
both the boat i sailed last yr for a year in gulf and my own formosa have straight galleys.mine has a strap for flight prevention. these straight galleys are BOTH starboard located. so add seidelmann to the growing list of " inept designers" with garden and perry. rofl-- that statement was made by someone who isnt so "up" on his cruisers or designers.....sory, hiracer, is a fact.
zeehag is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2010, 14:48   #38
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: The boat lives at Fidalgo Island, PNW
Boat: 36' custom steel
Posts: 992
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeehag View Post
. i noticed PERRY also does stbd side galleys...so they are bad designers???
ROFL.
Perry is the first to admit that, he who writes the check, has the last say in the design.

Personally, I prefer not having to be the give-way vessel during meal preparation, heave-to or sailing.

If you don't cook under sail, then galley location isn't important.

The fact remains, if you want downhill cooking AND the right of way while cooking, your galley must be port side. If one of those objectives is not important to you, by all means cook on the starboard side. It's not like this is a make or break proposition. It's a finesse thing, like differentiating an adequate wine from a great wine.
__________________
John, sailing a custom 36' double-headed steel sloop--a 2001 derivation of a 1976 Ted Brewer design.
Hiracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2010, 14:49   #39
Registered User
 
Auspicious's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Boat: HR 40
Posts: 1,793
Send a message via Skype™ to Auspicious
Wedging in is critical. I agree that hunching over is uncomfortable and not conducive to cooking. I think a good galley has lots of head room and opportunities for wedging in.

I may not have been clear about what I meant by pre-made meals. I DON'T mean crap (excuse the expression) in boxes in the frozen section of a grocery. I spend a couple of days before a passage cooking from scratch to make lasagna, pasta sauce, lots of soups, and a casserole or two. At sea I alternate those with meals cooked on the fly that are simple underway: shrimp risotto, roast pork loin, burgers, chicken or veal marsala -- there are lots of ways to keep people well fed that don't require finger food for days on end.

Prep before you leave makes a huge difference.

Most of which isn't relevant to galley layout beyond having a place to wedge in comfortably and stably for prep and cooking. Mise en place, including the cook.
__________________
S/V Auspicious
AuspiciousWorks
Beware cut and paste sailors
Auspicious is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2010, 14:51   #40
Registered User
 
Auspicious's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Boat: HR 40
Posts: 1,793
Send a message via Skype™ to Auspicious
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hiracer View Post
Personally, I prefer not having to be the give-way vessel during meal preparation, heave-to or sailing.
A very reasonable point.

In my view, if crew doesn't give the cook a heads up of 10 minutes or more that there is a potential issue there is a crew problem. If one HAS to heave to for meal prep there is a design problem.
__________________
S/V Auspicious
AuspiciousWorks
Beware cut and paste sailors
Auspicious is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2010, 14:54   #41
cat herder, extreme blacksheep
 
zeehag's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: furycame alley , tropics, mexico for now
Boat: 1976 FORMOSA yankee clipper 41
Posts: 17,770
Images: 56
Send a message via Yahoo to zeehag Send a message via Skype™ to zeehag
if one is in the predicament of having to figure out who is a give way vessel, then one is cruising in the wrong place and cooking is not the issue.
there is a large sea out there-- have ye sailed it and cooked??i have.many times.
the only time one would have to worry about ANYONE else being out in that sea is if yer RACING,not cruising. includes gulf of mexico and oceanic crossings.
you guys' postings sound like trying to cook while racing. rofl. LARGE DIFFERENCE.
cook can look out and SEE there is nothing coming from horizon to horizon. how long does it take a ship/boat/sailboat to travel from one horizon to the next , and how long will it take a ship to hit ye when you are seeing it on the horizon..LOL...cookie is safe-- unless yer racing. then ye dont have any reason to cook on board unless is a very, very long race, in which case, that is covered.
GORD-- there HAS to be an equation for this one!!!!
zeehag is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2010, 15:05   #42
Freelance Delivery Skipper..
 
boatman61's Avatar

Community Sponsor
Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: UK/Portugal
Posts: 20,209
Images: 2
Send a message via Skype™ to boatman61
pirate

But surely a vessel that is 'Hove-to' is a 'Vessel not under Command' and therefore every other vessel is obliged to give way...
If there's someone at the wheel/on watch why do you have to heave-to.. other than if solo...
Even then I often cook and the autopilot steers while I do a heads up every so often... maintain my average...
__________________


Born To Be Wild
boatman61 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2010, 15:09   #43
cat herder, extreme blacksheep
 
zeehag's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: furycame alley , tropics, mexico for now
Boat: 1976 FORMOSA yankee clipper 41
Posts: 17,770
Images: 56
Send a message via Yahoo to zeehag Send a message via Skype™ to zeehag
even in gulf for nearly year, we only came upon or were come upon 2 times--neither by sailboats-- we saw the shrimper pretending to eb tug'n'tow for 3 hours. we saw the ship and watched for 4 hours--lol-- is plenty of time to do anything ye want even ........
lol.
zeehag is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2010, 15:13   #44
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by boatman61 View Post
But surely a vessel that is 'Hove-to' is a 'Vessel not under Command' and therefore every other vessel is obliged to give way...
If there's someone at the wheel/on watch why do you have to heave-to.. other than if solo...
Even then I often cook and the autopilot steers while I do a heads up every so often... maintain my average...


How many power boaters even know what being Hove To is much less can recognize a hove-to sailboat when they see one?

I still say your better off buying a boat that has an interior layout that is going to maximize your comfort at anchor as long as its not absolutely horrid under way. Maximize the 95% of the time, avoid purchasing just to satisfy the 5% at the expense of the 95%.



Terry
__________________
Tspringer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2010, 15:18   #45
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC
Boat: S.V. Wildheart - 1976 Douglas 32'
Posts: 135
Send a message via MSN to serah
On our boat, one steps through the starboard offset companionway onto the ledge of the kitchen counter (not actually on to the counter). On the starboard side is our icebox (eventually to be refrigeration). If I was thinking, all items needed for cooking are already out, and the icebox lid is now a large counterspace. It also doubles as our navigation station/electronics area; I can't quite bring myself to call it a chart table. Underneath the bridgedeck is more counter space, and a ridiculously huge, non-marine sink, just to port of centreline. Then the port corner is our pantry recessed into the counter with a chopping board top; more counter space. And finally, on the port side of the cabin, our Wallas Stove/heater (when closed even more counter space.)

I can wedge myself in between the companionway ladder the edge of the sink and the front edge of the stove (not the actual stove) Though no way to secure myself when digging in the icebox. A strap will be added at some date.

At the end of the day, the entire aft end of the main cabin is our galley, though actual cooking tasks are on the port side. I never considered that there even was a reason the stove was on that side; I'm thankful that Mr. Brewer was aware of such reasons.

Then again, I've not done any ocean passages. I hope she'll do
__________________

__________________
serah is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Kitchen Sink . . . reiner Plumbing Systems and Fixtures 24 22-10-2010 06:25
Kitchen Rudder fishwife Powered Boats 4 24-01-2010 14:14
kitchen sink at below waterline content Plumbing Systems and Fixtures 21 12-11-2008 18:37
Best fabrics for seating and kitchen tops anglooff Construction, Maintenance & Refit 14 17-08-2007 08:28



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:08.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.