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Old 02-09-2009, 14:59   #1
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How Big Is Big Enough for Anchoring on the Bay of Fundy?

How big is a big enough anchor for the Bay of Fundy?
Hello all,

I have a 1978 Pearson 26 and I need a bigger anchor for my next big trip. I will be starting in New York and cruising up the coast of Maine. I'm not too worried about the first half of the trip, I think my two big Danforths will suffice. But when I get up towards the Bay of Fundy it's a slightly different story. My ultimate destination is a small cove in Trescott, Maine, the easternmost town in the United States, where I have a little cabin on the shore. The cove is pretty well protected but if the wind blows just right it can catch some ocean swell. Also, the tidal swing is a whopping 25 feet. The bottom is hard muddy sand, but I will no doubt be anchoring in some rocky areas on my way up. When I get to the cabin I will be leaving the boat anchored for about two weeks. It will no doubt be susceptible to chafe and it will also be the start of Hurricane season so a real blow is not out of the question.

So.... what size anchor type and size would be best (plow or bruce perhaps? 30 lbs maybe?)? What configuration, length and type of rode/chain should I use? Would all-chain make sense to cut down on chafe, or should I just use hose for that? Obviously I would rather be safe than sorry on this, but I will be weighing anchor mostly by hand so I don't want to go crazy.

I'm pretty new at cruising so don't be afraid of stating the obvious. Any advice is much appreciated.

Thanks, Jack
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Old 02-09-2009, 15:17   #2
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Oh boy, another anchor thread.

There are three topics the will generate more diverse opinions amongst cruisers than any other group of subjects combined.
Politics, Religion, and which anchor is best.
I used a Bruce with chain for nine years, worked for me, and yes it drug in certain conditions, but they all do.
John
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Old 02-09-2009, 15:37   #3
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Well, if you listen to the anchor mavens, nothing is ever enough. You need at least two 40 lb anchors, all chain, and a fisherman stowed below for when the weather gets really bad. And that's for a 15 foot boat. Don't forget the snubbers, either.

I don't know about Trescott, Maine, but they have plenty of marinas in Maine right up through Bar Harbor, and some even have moorings. Maine also has trees, and unless the wind is blowing you on a lee shore, a line tied around a tree will hold better than any anchor. Prevailing winds are SW.

IMHO the times when you need a second anchor cruising the NE are really few and far between. I use a 35 lb CQR and carry 25 lb Manson Supreme, but the latter is still a virgin.
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Old 02-09-2009, 20:14   #4
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A lot of rock you need chain. Rope will chafe as it will hook onto a rock or rocks and chafe off.
Almost landed on the beach when a 1 1/2" mooring line caught on a rock and chafed off in less than 30 minutes. Ended up on my prop. Dumped everything on the foredeck and ended up tapdancing on the bottom in 40 knots of wind in 12 foot waves 75 ft from the beach. Not a pleasant evening.
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Old 17-09-2009, 09:42   #5
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Orange crush, I'm sorry if this is a little late, I have only in the last day joined this discussion group.
FYI, I live 10 mins away from the Fundy Bay.
If you are hoping to anchor in the Fundy, I have 2 questions:
Why would you want to? and where are you planning on achoring?
The Fundy is not a very fun place to sail around in unless you are talking about very near the enterance to the bay.
Up toward the Minas Basin, the tide can run as high as 7 knts with a tidal range of 40'-00"
You will have to choose your trips very carefully and then sail only when the timing is right.
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Old 17-09-2009, 10:01   #6
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Hello Vic (and others),

Thanks again for the replies. I own a small cabin on the coast of Maine, just south of the town of Lubec. It's on a cove called Moose Cove, if you want to look it up on google or something you can find it by searching for Moose River Road. Just south of Haycock Harbour and Bailey's Mistake.

It's technically in the Grand Manan Channel, and yes as you said it's pretty much right at the opening of the bay. Since I was a little kid I have always driven up to Maine from New York every summer for a couple of weeks, but now that I have a boat I want to reach it by the water. I'm not planning on going any farther into Fundy Bay than my place, although I wouldn't rule out a trip to Grand Manan or maybe even Nova Scotia if time permits...

I am very aware of the tidal challenges as well as other hazards to cruising. The cove itself is pretty protected from normal wind and wave patterns, but I will be there during hurricane season so a real blow is not out of the question.

I will be outfitting my boat with radar and a good chart plotter to help me with the fog, lobsterboats and rocks. I'll be making my last stop in Machiasport to resupply the boat (since we won't have a car.) I will, of course, time my approach to the final destination with tidal movements in mind. I guess if a serious hurricane was going to arrive we could take the boat back to the better protected Machias Harbor before it got there.

Does this plan sound reasonable to you? Where exactly do you live? I know that not too many cruising boats make it up this far, but hopefully I can be well prepared and do it safely and relatively comfortably.

Any opinions or advice is much appreciated.

Thanks,
Jack
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Old 17-09-2009, 10:29   #7
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Hello Jack,
I live in Kentville, Nova Scotia, on the Minas Basin side of Cape Split, right on the Cornwallis River.
I keep my boat, an Albin Ballad, on the south shore near the village of Chester.
The south shore of Nova Scotia is a great place for sailing and there are hundreds of islands to visit and explore. There are many bays and coves where one can safely ride out a hurricane. I would recommend the coast of Nova Scotia to any sailor who is not to worried about sailing in these colder waters.
Your plan sound very reasonable and I would certainly encourage a chartplotter with a good GPS. A radar is helpfull to keep track of shipping and fishing boats when it gets foggy.
A trip frrom NY would be a great experience depending on the timeframe... if you are in no hurry, there are so many beautifull stops along the way that it could take an awfully long time to get to Machias, if you want to do some sight seeing...
On the opposite side, sailing anywhere around the Fundy Bay is tricky and I would only do so if I have experienced crew onboard and a motor that works every time you turn the key (which fortunately I have).
I would not try and tell anyone not to sail in the Fundy, it can be a very spectacular place.(I go canoe-ing every now and then).. one just have to be wide awake at all times. Many years ago a lot of old sailing schooners used to visit the Minas Basin on a regular basis and even to date, the Gypsum ships still come all the way up the basin to Windsor,.... and lobster and herring boats venture up here daily... just not my cuppa-tea.
If you do decide to make it up this way, keep in contact.
Vic de Beer
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Old 17-09-2009, 10:40   #8
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Oh yes, about the anchoring.
I would always recommend my personal preference, a CQR (plow), with at least 100ft of 5/16" chain (for a boat your size) and then enough rope to get you at leats 5:1 ration (depth:length of rode). If you are in water that is shallow enough that the ration of chain:depth-of-water exceeds the 5:1, I would still let out enough rope to depth minus 6 feet (in case of rocks).
and, by the way, make sure you bouy your anchor, just in case it gets snagged and you don't want to dive to unsnag it.(the water gets rather chilly.)
Vic
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Old 17-09-2009, 10:41   #9
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oft-quoted advice

Quote:
Originally Posted by OrangeCrush View Post
I'm pretty new at cruising so don't be afraid of stating the obvious. Any advice is much appreciated.
Your anchor isn't big enough until the guys back at your marina start laughing at it.
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Old 17-09-2009, 10:43   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bash View Post
Your anchor isn't big enough until the guys back at your marina start laughing at it.
Or your wife can no longer pull it up...
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