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View Poll Results: Is a combination of rope and chain better than an all chain in heavy weather?
Yes 3 50.00%
No 3 50.00%
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Old 23-09-2003, 12:39   #1
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Heavy weather anchoring,

I've read where some evidence exists that a mixture of rope and chain will provide better holding than with all chain in gale conditions. Supposedly the reason is that the elasticity of rope prevents snatch loads being supplied to the the anchor. I'm curious as to how many of you cruisers out there would agree with this analogy?
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Old 23-09-2003, 14:14   #2
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Rope & Chain

You are certainly right, in that the elasticity of Rope can help to reduce shock loads (& snatch-out) on an anchor rode.
An all Chain rode need not suffer high shock loads, provided an adequate Rope snubber is properly attached.
An all chain rode (for weight & chafe resistance), with a long(ish) rope snubber (for shock absorption & failure alarm) is one excellent heavy weather set-up.

and an instructive tale (Ithaka):

Cruising World - The Log of ITHAKA
http://old.cruisingworld.com/ithaka/articles/066/

and another opinion (Tom Wood):
http://www.sailnet.com/collections/a...leid=woodto051

Regards,
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Old 23-09-2003, 19:27   #3
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Hi Gord,

Thanks for the info. Your comments make good sense on the differences between using an combination rode vs.an all chain one with a snubber.
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Old 23-09-2003, 20:47   #4
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Hi Stede and ya'll.

Anchoring is my favorite subject and I have paid much attention to it.

May not be the worlds greatest sailor or sea-man, but I know how to anchor...(Hate surprises in the middle of the night I do.)

Here is my opinion on chain versus line:

Chain is safer in the long run as it will not chafe and nobody can snorkel out with a knife and cut it.
(It has happened to cruisers anchored of the coast of Haiti, locals swim out and cut the nylon, 15 minuttes later the boat is on the beach where the entire village is waiting to loot the wreck

I stay away from places like Jamaica and Haiti. the locals have not figured out how to feed 'emselves and instead found it easier to rob tourists and visitors.
So be it, they can have their garbage islands to themselfs...
(Been there many times and also heard the horror stories from the victims.
You will find me in Luperon or Georgetown instead of Port-Au-Prince or Kingston...Sailors take warning.)


I have had both the short chain and long nylon combo (30' of chain, 100' of nylon) as well as the medium chain and medium nylon, (75' of chain and 150' of nylon) and now I cruise with 215' of chain spliced on to 250' of 3/4' 3 strand New England nylon
line.

The last time I had a problem was when I had the 75' of chain and 150' of nylon rode.
We were anchored in Chub Cay in the Bahamas with several cold fronts coming in, and we got all the action right in the face..
With the nylon over the anchor roller, we chafed and chafed despite all the towels and the plastic tubing and all that.
We were sort of stuck there for 8 days and had a lot of time to think about the anchor and rode situation...(The 35# CQR dragged, the nylon chafed)

Once back in Florida I bought the biggest anchor my CSY 33 could carry with style, a 55# Delta and the long chain, 5/16 High Test, G4 Accor, 215 feet.
And added a Sea Tiger 555 windlass to lift all that.
Never had a problem since.
Sleep good at night, and don't care what the neigbors do, I am extremely happy with my set-up.

As far as the main question here, chain or line?

Well, if ya are stuck in a hurricane situation, then chain and line may be the answer becuase of the stretch and shock-absorbing capabiltity of the nylon. It could save the day for sure, just keep an eye on the chafe, that could ruin the day....

Remember this story:

Newbie in a bar ask old salt about which anchor is best.
Old salt says more scope.
Newbie says, uh no, what I meant to say is: What kind of anchor is best..?

Old salt repeats, more scope.............
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Old 24-09-2003, 05:50   #5
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Hi CSY and everyone,

Man, I hadn't heard the stories about Haitians snorkling out and cutting the anchor line. I always imagined that it happened some where though. It reminded me of when I chartered a boat out of St.Martin. The company I chartered from used stainless steel cable with a plastic covering for the dink painter. They said there had been problems with people cutting the rope painters after dark from boats. If the dink was" found adrift" by the locals it was considered "free bounty." If they were caught cutting the rope on a dink, well.....it was considered almost "free bounty." As far as the anchoring, I know what you mean about the chafing. I've used my share of sacrificial rubber hoses.Your heavy duty anchor/rode set up sounds like it would provide some restful sleep. I hate rude awakenings in the early morning too! Great story about the old salt and the newbie in the bar. I'll have to remember that one
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Old 24-09-2003, 05:53   #6
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Rope & Chain

ANCHORING - ROPE vs CHAIN vs COMBINATION(s):

As with most things, there is no a right nor wrong answer to the rope-chain question, nor can the question be examined in isolation.

The anchor rode is (1) part of a mooring system, itself (1) part of the larger boat system. Any consideration of any one part must take place within the context of the whole, with reference to a multitude of related variables.

What on earth an I getting at? Prior to any specific analysis of Rope & Chain, there are a few questions each of us must answer:

Q1 - Bottom & Depth
- Over what types of bottom, and at what depths am designing my anchor system for?
Etc...

Q2 - External Constraints
- Are my expected anchorages crowded, limiting practical scope; or can I expect to have room to lay out 10X depth or more?
- Are there reefs, rocks, bars or other obstructions that will constrain my choices?
- What do the locals do? You’re, more or less, obliged to observe local custom, and mimic the set-up of your neighbors.
- How protected (or exposed) are your intended anchorages (to wind & wave/surge)?
- What other unusual features might you contend with? In very well protected and steep-to Lake Superior anchorages, I often tie Bow to Shore, /w stern anchor set .
Etc...

Q3 - Internal Constraints
- What is my dollar budget? Tho’ listed first, I advise that this is the least important factor.
- What is my weight & space budget? Every boat will be limited in the amount of weight she can safely carry, and (to a lesser extent) the space that may be devoted to ground tackle.
- What can I, and my crew handle? There’s no point in carrying gear that you are unable to effectively deploy. Although a windlass is a wonderful luxury, I would not rely on it’s infallible reliability (except, perhaps on the largest yachts) - and would insist that I be able to manually handle the ground tackle in an emergency situation.
- What is (or can be) my deck hardware set-up? What type and capacity are my fairleads, cleats, bollards, chain locks, and other strong points; and what is their suitability to a particular rode type?
- How many set-ups can I carry? I’ve never cruised with less than three (3) complete anchor set-ups, each slightly different from the other. My habit, in the Bahamas, was to carry four (4), with the fourth being matched to my prime (for Bahamian Mooring).
- What is my level of situational awareness? I can sleep soundly through the wind noise & wave action of a storm - but any new mechanical sound will awaken me instantly. I’m used to the normal boat noises, but any untoward clink, clunk, or bang gets my immediate attention. I will detect any shock loads transmitted to the deck hardware, but will blissfully be totally unaware of the wailing wind, or pitching and/or heeling that would have presaged the event.
Etc...

Q4 - Intended Usage
- Lunch hooks are just as important as long term anchorages, but should be simpler to deploy and raise. Notice, I said “should” be (not “can” be). This is to comply with two principles I always (try to) adhere to:
(A) If it’s worth doing - do it right. Half-assed measures will always come back to bite you!
(B) Make it easy (on yourself) to do it right. I’m lazy, and may not always do the “right” thing, unless it’s (more or less) easy.
- Obviously, overnight (& longer) anchorages require a much more secure mooring, and are worth an exponentially larger investment (in time, energy, and money).
Etc...

I think we are all aware of the basic properties of Chain & Rope, so I won’t burden you with a detailed recapitulation - but please bear them in mind as we analyze some of the features, functions, and benefits of various set-ups, intended to satisfy differing purposes under differing constraints.

ALL CHAIN:
Will be heavy, strong, inelastic, chafe-resistant. expensive, and difficult to belay.

ALL ROPE:
Will be light, (can be ) strong, stretchy, prone to chafe, cheap(er), & easily belayed.

ROPE & CHAIN:
Will have moderate weight (depending upon ratios), strong, chafe-resistant on bottom, but prone to chafe topside, moderately priced, easily belayed but requires an additional shackle joint.

- 3/8" High Test Chain has a published WLL of 5,400# (33%), a breaking strength of 16,200#, weighs about 2#/Foot, no appreciable stretch, will not abrade, and costs about $3.80/Ft.
By comparison:
7/8" Three-Strand Nylon has a calculated (I use 20%) WLL of about 4,700#, a published breaking strength of 23,500#, weighs a mere 1/3#/Ft, about 15% stretch, will abrade/chafe, at a cost of about $1.80/Ft.

Note the differing ratios of Working Load Limit (WLL) vs Breaking Strength;
(Chain WLL = 33% Strength -while- Rope WLL = 20% of Strength)

AN ADEQUATE ROPE-CHAIN (Compromise) SET-UP for “Southbound”:
(C&C 29 low-profile, /w 5.5' draft & approx. 8,500 loaded - 6,700# dry displacement)

Assuming typical depths of 8 - 12' (/w 25' max. depth) over either sand (soft or hard) or hard-pan (shale, coral, rock) and very occasional grass, in fairly crowded Bahamian anchorages , where Bahamian mooring is the ‘norm’:

OMO - I propose a primary set-up consisting of:

(2) 25# Fortress “FX-37 Anchors (equivalent size to a 60# Danforth 60H), (manufacturer’s suggested for 46-51' Boat @ 3,000# WLL)
each c/w
(20 Ft.) 5/16" Stainless High-Test Grade 4 Chain (3,750# WLL - 30# total weight/each)
or Better Alternative
(20') 1/4" Transport Grade 7 Chain (4,200# WLL - 20# Wt. ea - likely cheaper too)
(250') 7/8" Tree-Strand Nylon (4700# WLL)
(18#) Sentinel Weight (actually mushroom river anchors for dinghies)on (35') 3/8" leash (which can double as dinghy painter/dockline)
Chafing Gear [actually anti-chafing ] consisting of long snug-fitting (not tite) 1" I.D. polyester-cotton sleeves, inside 1-7/8" loose clear vinyl hose . Note: there are now better anti-chafe products commercially available.

Backed up by:
(1) 35# Delta Anchor
c/w
(70') 1/4" Grade 7 Chain
(200') 7/8" Three-Strand Nylon c/w Chafe gear
(1) Sentinel c/w (50') Leash.
(2) 50' x ½" Snubbers c/w claw (can claw to chain or hitch to rope)
and
(1) Fortress “FX-11" (rated for my boat - but normally used /w dinghy)
c/w
(10') 1/4 Stainless High-Test chain (1570# WLL) fitted /w (75') 3/8" Nylon (880# WLL), and supported by (backup) (150') ½" Nylon (1500# WLL).
and (just because I own it)
(1) 22# Bruce c/w 50' Chain + 150' Rope etc ... (I’d prefer another 35# Delta set-up)

The 35# Delta is stored on bow rollers /w rode in buckets in bow locker.
The Fortress’ FX-37's are stored in PVC Pipe “Rocket Launchers” on pulpit /w rodes in bucket in bow locker.
The buckets (plastic paint pails) allow me to easily unwind rode wraps.
The FX-11 assembly is either in the dink, or a rocket launcher on the pushpit /w rode in bucket.
The Bruce assembly is buried in the (bottom) cockpit locker .

So, what are the advantages and disadvantages of my anchoring complement (above)?

For DEPTH & BOTTOM:

I’ve proposed 270 of primary rode, allowing a safe storm anchorage in up to 20 feet of water [(20' depth + 4' freeboard) x 10X scope] + 30' on deck (to cleat & mast). This should be sufficient for the Bahamian and Lake Superior anchorages specified.
My two prime Anchor & Rode assemblies, including sentinels, weigh about 100 Lbs Total / each (light, strong, & long)

Were I cruising the Pacific, or elsewhere with greater anticipated depths, and more bottom hazards (coral, rock, etc.); I’d want lengthier effective rode, and higher chafe resistance. This would require either:
A higher Chain to Rope ratio (especially where greater bottom chafe hazard)
or
More total rode length (add chain first)

For EXTERNAL CONSTRAINTS:

I’ve proposed a complement of four set-ups, providing flexibility of choice in dealing with various situations. I can lay greater lengths of chain, as the bottom conditions dictate, but don’t carry the weight penalty of all-chain.

I have traded the desirable benefits of greater lengths of chain, for the (more desirable) flexibility afforded by longer & more numerous anchor assemblies.

My set-ups are obviously a compromise - I’d love to have more iron in the water - bigger and heavier are better! We all have to solve our own (compromise) cost-benefit equations - the only constant being the ability to generate an INFORMED balance sheet.

For INTERNAL CONSTRAINTS:

“Southbound” is a small boat, with a relatively large anchor locker. Though severely limited in my weight-carrying ability, I do have space (volume) , hence numerous but not overly-heavy assemblies.
The use of sentinels puts considerable down-force at the end of the lever arm (where I need it), increasing the catenary and ‘effective’ scope of the rode, at a relatively light o/all weight. It’s a lot of “bang for the buck”.

Likewise, being fairly light weight, either my mate (Maggie @ 105 Lbs) can handle the gear under most circumstances. Even a 70' bucket of chain can be a handful, when trying to dinghy out an anchor in a blow.

Deck Hardware deserves a full and complete discussion on it’s own - so suffice it to say:
Numerous, Big, and Strong are the imperatives.

Some might argue that I undersize my rope chain snubbers; but I’ve never had one of mine break, allowing the chain go tight (and sound the alarm). I have heard a neighboring boat’s snubber alarm. His chain loop was too small, and when the snubber stretched out, his chain suddenly took up the load. I could hear and see it from 100 yards away (in a storm). There is one additional advantage to a smaller-diameter snubber - namely "Engineered Failure Mode" - when the snubber breaks, I'm alerted to the neccessity to take further action, which I am able to do. I have no objection if you’ve space for a larger-diameter snubber, and it makes you feel better.

I always have three anchors instantly ready to go. Not only does this serve us well in an emergency, but it makes it easy to deploy them under routine conditions. I find it (personally) important to make it easy to consistently and constantly do the right thing - routine tends to lull ever-one into complacency - AND I’M lazy.

I hope that this discussion leads to further comment, argument, and anecdotal exemplars.

Regards,
Gord












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Old 24-09-2003, 15:07   #7
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Which is "better"?...Depends. Try to row out a second anchor with 200 feet of 3/8" chain! ...Carry many, use what makes the most sense...that's what I do

ps Gord...For what it worth, My dad always said it is CHAFE gear, because its purpose is to chafe so your line doesn't....
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Old 24-09-2003, 21:06   #8
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Yeah Mr. Brad:

Rowing out a bunch of chain and heavy anchor may not be possible at all times.
Been there done that and tried it..

Heard much about the "Bahamian Moor" and why one needs to carry 2 good anchors and rodes up front.
(So the load shifts when the tide turnes, etc.)

Never been a problem in my book or on my boat....Yet.

I'd rather set ONE big anchor that re-sets when the direction of the pull goes the other way.

If ya are lucky it will re-set, if not, uh ya are drifting and dragging down on somebody that was smarter than ya and set out 2 good anchors...The joke is on me for sure.

Therefore I tend to stay away from a crowded anchorage with a strong tidal current....Don't need the head-ace and uh, so far so good.
No head-ace and no dragging in strong currents.

(Typical example would be anchoring inside North Bimini with a strong currrent reversing every 6 hours and boats close to Port and to Starboard, ahead and behind, and bad holding...Hello why would anybody take up residence in that place to start with....? Especially with the close to shore bugs and the lack of breeze...?)

Anchor outside in good sand and with no other boats around instead.
Life be easy and life be good.

(We do carry a stern anchor however, and that thing is being used frequently to pull the stern over and get the bow into the waves instead of into the wind...Would much rather have some pitching than heavy rolling, all night along...
Because, If mama ain't happy on the boat, nobody ain't happy.)

Some day however I may wish for having a Bahamian moor, with anchors and chain all over, just like the cruising guides recommend to stay safe...
We have the technology onboard, 3 anchors and 4 rodes, but we are too lazy to mess with it on a regular basis.

Instead:

Put a big sucker down I'd say, at least 3 times the size recommended by the glossy brochures and the secretaries answering the phone at the anchor factories, (My 33 feet boat is supposed to carry a 22 # Delta according to the brochures and the tables and the recommedations, I bypassed the 22, the 33, the 44 and put on a 55# instead.

Droppin the big anchor, away from close neigbors in the Bahamas and other places, and setting the anchor good in reverse power at over 2000 RPM seems to solve some of the problems of dragging and drifting with a change of wind or current.

Having a rum-punch and relaxing is on the agenda instead of doing the Bahamian Moor and all that fancy tap-dancing..

Most folks don't understand that ya can not have too big of an anchor or too much rode or anchor stuff..

I learned the hard way myself years ago as a new cruiser.
Did not listen to the old salts.
Now I am preaching the gospel myself..Put down the biggest anchor ya can carry, then cancel ya annual boat insurance.
The money saved will pay for the chain and the anchor real soon.

And ya sleep much better.........
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Old 26-09-2003, 05:54   #9
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Good posts - some comments

ANCHORING: The high quality of the foregoing thoughtful postings illustrates the wisdom, experience & knowledge of our Cruisers Forum fraternity. Keep the good information coming!!!

Further to CSY Man:

I’m not certain that you really believe that “...chain is safer in the long run...”, as you go on to admit that “...chain & line may be the answer... in a hurricane situation. I think, you are, rightfully, discriminating between differing situations - wherein there is no ONE absolutely right answer.

You “stay away from places like Jamaica & Haiti” , and also from “crowded anchorages with a strong tidal current” (Bimini etc). This demonstrates an admirably heightened awareness of external constraints.

Anchored at Chub Cay, “with the nylon OVER THE ANCHOR ROLLER, we chafed and chafed despite all the towels...”. There are several good reasons to NOT use the anchor roller with a deployed anchor.
- Anchor rollers are almost never perfectly fair, and nearly impossible to make so.
- You extend the lever arm that the rode exerts on the boat, increasing pitch, yaw, & jerk - all bad things.
- It’s not nearly as strong as a proper (toe rail) fairlead.
Now over 8 days (at Chub) you must have veered and turned considerably, setting to all cardinal points at various times. A single (even very large anchor) is not likely to fare well under these circumstances. You are asking it to set & re-set too many times, churning up the bottom each time it does (or, oops, does not) so!

You go on to discuss the Bahamian Moor, opining that you’d “rather set ONE big anchor that re-sets...”. , but go on to admit that it requires luck, then further admit that you “... are too lazy to mess with it...”
Well, I don’t know what to say - you seem to have covered the dichotomy ...

I am NOT criticizing your opinions, so much as your presentation, which I found somewhat confusing & contradictory (I’m not too bright, so maybe it’s just me).

You have put your finger on three very important principles:
“...MORE SCOPE...”
I’d modify this to read more ‘effective’ scope; which would include the use of sentinel weights etc.

“... SETTING THE ANCHOR GOOD...”
Nothing will hold, until it’s properly set.

”...YOU CANNOT HAVE TOO BIG AN ANCHOR OR TOO MUCH RODE OR ANCHOR STUFF”
Speaks for itself.

Pardon my shout - but I feel these are important imperatives!

Further to Stede:

The plastic covered S/S cable is an excellent dinghy painter. I locked my 30' cable to the Outboard, and then locked the running end to the dock. Rarely, at very crowded dinghy docks, this isn’t possible - as you may have to push in (past other dinks) to the dock, disembark, and let the dink drift back away to it’s (previously deployed) stern anchor. A longer cable would solve this, but it starts to get pretty cumbersome - do do what you can, then oh well...

This weekend, I’ll try to get back to my lengthy reply to your original query, “Rope vs Chain”.

Further to bradbarrett:

You make an excellent point about rowing out all chain - You have to be able to handle your gear, under all conceivable circumstances!
As you indicate “...carry many, use what makes sense...” Provide yourself the flexibility
to appropriately respond to all likely conditions.

I like totake the George Carlin approach to semantics
it’s anti-chafe gear (notwithstanding your Dad’s proper understanding of it’s purpose)
likewise, I’d prefer to:
get IN a plane (rather than ‘on’ it), donate to the anti-cancer society,
and no matter what the politically correct language-police say, they will always be (to me):
MANhole covers, chairMEN, and we are all part of MANkind (or huMANity).

And finally, you’re not off the hook yet, I intend to return to and expand my earlier post, “Rope & Chain”, later.

Regards,
Gord





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Old 26-09-2003, 07:40   #10
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Okay Gord and thanks for picking my post apart with a microscope, I guess.

Well, to answer at least some of yer questions:
The eight days in Chub Cay when we were stuck in bad weater:
No, did not turn and change direction as the wind was pretty steady from the West for days at end..(I know, a bit unusual, but caused by the coldfronts that kept rolling in from Florida)

As you know, the anchorage in Chub is not protected from the West, therefore we had lots of piching, which stretched the nylon out and in over the rubber roller, like a rubber band expanding nad contracting.
That is what caused the chafe.

If I have had more local knowledge at the time, we could have gone somewhere else and anchored in a better spot, but did not.

The rubber roller by the way is perfect for chain, but not for nylon.
I have since had a 316 SS roller fabricated for the Port side of my anchor platform, polished and electro-polished, to use with the hurricane-rode that is ready under the V-berth, 75' of 7/16 chain and 200' 3/4 nylon, and to be hooked up to the big FX55 Fortress anchor with a holding power of 16,000 lbs in good sand..(According to the manufactor, but I'd be happy if I get half of that)

Will however do my best to stay away from any "named" storm, but my crystal ball seem to be permanently broken, so it is hard to plan too far ahead..

As far as not wanting any part of the Bahamian moor, yep try to anchor away from a situation that would require it....Like inside Bimini harbor as I said earlier, bad holding, mosqitoes and strong current, not sure why anybody would anchor there in the first place.
Basically I am too lazy to deal with headaces..

Yes, there is no perfect answer to the question on chain only or chain/nylon.
Still, I do sleep better with all chain as my primary rode, coral, chafe or anything else can not cut it..
Other folks may disagree and use nylon instead, fine for them and if they also sleep good, that is fantastic. Go for it, I am not trying to push my method, just explaining why I do it my way.

Really a fairly simple choice and one could go wrong (Or be right)
either way...

As for leading the anchor rode over a toe rail fair-lead instead, don't think that is an option on my boat, it would cut into the teak and also present more sideways exposure I should think..?

You found my presentation confusing?

Well, what can I say, I probably wrote it after consuming good beer, 'cause that is when I get smart and want to share my wisdom....

Lighten up Mr. Gordmay, this is not a university thesis, just some sailors hanging out taking about boats and such.
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Old 26-09-2003, 08:05   #11
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On setting anchor from Dinghy

A note re: Setting Anchors from the Dinghy:

Maggie & I weathered “Danielle” (‘92) at Sandy Hook, N.J. We set two bowers in decent sand, at about 90-120 degrees, and never budged.

Several other boats dragged, one spending the entire night motoring about vainly trying to get a set. One of these, was in a position where she might soon threaten “Southbound”, and I was consequently, highly motivated to help them.

It was windy enough that I had to tack my 3HP dink to make headway into it.

I tried to take set an additional anchor (theirs) from my dinghy (10' Zodiac /w 3 HP Outboard). It was an 18# Danforth (or so) c/w 3/8" All-Chain rode. They began by giving me the anchor, and feeding the chain off their bow, which dragged my stern around mercilessly. No go. Next, we dumped a bunch of chain into my dink, and I tried to take it out, paying it over myself. I’m still tethered to their bow by (heavy) chain, so - no go.

Finally, I took one of my own spare anchors (Bruce) c/w Chain & Rope - laid the anchor, paid the chain, and handed them the rope to cleat. I joined them on the bow, and three of us pulled up on the newly laid anchor and temporarily belayed it, so that it took the wind load. This achieved “some sort of” set. Then as satisfied as likely to get, we released the temporary belay, allowing the boat to fall back to a balance twixt the newly set anchor and the original.

This set-up safely held all night until “Danielle” was a mere memory.

Lessons learned:
(1) It’s very difficult to drag out a fixed rode, with a small-powered dighy. Instead, take out the entire assembly, lay it, and bring back only the bitter end, which is dealt with from the bow of the boat.
(2) Get a bigger outboard for the dink! (I did).

Gord
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Old 26-09-2003, 09:05   #12
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Old 26-09-2003, 09:28   #13
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Good-day Gord...

Okay so is a "fender" a "fender"? OR an "anti-fender"?

As I am sure you'll agree, there are problem with a just a bigger outboard in a bad , lets say, low catagory hurricane situation, as they relate to hauling out an extra anchor. 1) is all the lines from other boats that are (possibly) in the water -Chafed (anti-chafed?) off, cut off floating anchor lines from those who "cut and run"- waiting to be snagged by your prop, 2) You may not even be able to keep the dinghy on (in?) the water, the wind blowing it up/over...and 3) anything else that could lead to failure of the outboard...ie, fouled plugs, out of gas, that could leave you easily at the mercy of the storm, in a situation you cannot motor or row out of...
I was in such a situation, only once thank God, during Hurricane Ewa in the south pacific...A dinghy was impossible...hell, a 21 foot boston whaler with ballast would have been! I actually had to empty 3 jerry jugs (water), use small stuff to tie the anchor rope/chain combination, and an anchor to the jugs, put on my life jacket and wetsuit , fins and mask, and go over the side into the water...Using the jugs to float the anchor and rode , with the bitterend attached to the boat, I swam the rode out until I reached the end and then cut the anchor loose from the jugs...After a swim back and some help on board, everything was set and we had a secure, if be it nervous, ride through the hurricane...

Best Regards...
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Old 26-09-2003, 09:41   #14
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[QUOTE]bradbarrett once whispered in the wind:
[B]Good-day Gord...

Okay so is a "fender" a "fender"? OR an "anti-fender"?

You got me there ... , but it's certainly not an "Anti-Bumper".

How about we compromise, and call the other stuff 'chafe protection', rather than chafe or anti-chafe gear. ?

As to your tale of "Ewa" ... yikes! Good tale - exciting & informative.
Gord
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Old 26-09-2003, 09:50   #15
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Cleaned out my mailbox, and looking forward to mail.

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