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Old 15-06-2007, 16:03   #1
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Gas engines

You all will have to excuse me, I've been confused since I saw a sailboat that is pointy on BOTH ends. Used to be boat engines were gasoline because diesels were too big and heavy for boats. Stoves were alcohol, kerosene, or solid fuel because natural gas or propane were judged too dangerous for a boat. Now, you can't sell a boat with a gasoline engine...even if the engine is in great shape...and ya gotta be cookin' with gas. I'm confused. So how 'bout I convert my gasoline engine to propane? I'd still want proper fuel line installation and a shut off valve of course, like any fuel supply. Vapor dispersal procedures should not be any more rigerous than for gasoline. I wonder how the underwriters who now charge more for gasoline boats would justify continuing the practice?
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Old 15-06-2007, 16:29   #2
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I recommend you swap in a proven 1980 Morgan +8 Turbo propane engine:

Morgan Cars, Sales, Imports, Isis Imports Ltd.
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Old 15-06-2007, 23:14   #3
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Nothing wrong with gas engines. A lot of powerboaters still have them. You just have to be extra careful with fuel leaks and vapors. Always run your blowers prior to turning the ignition on.
A lot of folks still have their good old Atomic 4s and love them.
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Old 16-06-2007, 00:48   #4
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Diesel engines are cheaper to run, last longer, you can start it if the battery is flat( and the engine ain't too big) and you can run a Diesel underwater. As long as the air intake is kept above water level, the engine will run. That could be the difference between maintaining bilge pumping just that wee bit longer or sinking early :-)
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Old 16-06-2007, 01:16   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Snyder
I'm confused. So how 'bout I convert my gasoline engine to propane? I'd still want proper fuel line installation and a shut off valve of course, like any fuel supply. Vapor dispersal procedures should not be any more rigerous than for gasoline.
Are you trying to build a bomb? One leak and you're a goner. Propane motors are designed to be in open spaces, like a warehouse or shop with plenty of ventilation.

If the (heavy) propane were to settle in the bilge, one little spark, and BOOOM!

Now if it were CNG with an intro-fed bilge blower to dissipate the fumes, it might be a bit safer. But trying to expel propane from a bilge is dangerous. ..............................................._/)
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Old 24-06-2007, 13:34   #6
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First post successful and Thanks.

So, yeah I'm new here. 'Preciate your responses. I have no intention of installing a gas (propane, cng, or any other such) engine in a boat. Just that it strikes me as ironic that such gasses used to be considered to be too dangerous for cooking on board and now are greatly prefered, while gasoline, with as much explosive potential, used to be the prefered engine fuel and is now considered too dangerous for a boat.
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Old 15-04-2016, 17:48   #7
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Re: Gas engines

They're both damned dangerous, but the ABYC standards for propane heating and cooking keep the system very simple and turned off at the source when not in use. You are not even permitted a junction in the hose. Running propane to an engine would mean multiple joints to leak, and carburators are by design leaks, so let's not even think about it.
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