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Old 04-06-2013, 14:07   #1
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Question 12 -> 24 Volt converter

If I wanted to get say a new electric windlass... why not get a 24 Volt and run it through a 12-24V converter back near the battery bank? Seems I could then run 24V lines... ie smaller gauge than I would if I had to run a 12V windlass... less loss etc.

??Thoughts?? am i silly for even considering this?
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Old 04-06-2013, 14:37   #2
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Re: 12 -> 24 Volt converter

The windless uses way to much power for a reasonably priced converter/inverter. Take a look at this web site.

Mike24 Volts from 12
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Old 04-06-2013, 14:39   #3
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Re: 12 -> 24 Volt converter

The little step up converters I've looked are pretty common but something to handle 100 amps or whatever would cost as much as your windlass. Well maybe not but this is a money looser idea.
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Old 05-06-2013, 11:59   #4
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Re: 12 -> 24 Volt converter

If you search the Backwoods Solar company catalog, I think they have some 12 / 24 volt DC, DC converters. One of these could be used to charge a 24 volt battery even though it would not provide "operating" current. With a low duty cycle on the windlass and enough capacity in the 24 volt battery for the biggest job you would only need to run 10 gauge cable forward to the winch for charging.
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Old 05-06-2013, 21:08   #5
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Re: 12 -> 24 Volt converter

Quote:
Originally Posted by xeon_tsd View Post
If I wanted to get say a new electric windlass... why not get a 24 Volt and run it through a 12-24V converter back near the battery bank? Seems I could then run 24V lines... ie smaller gauge than I would if I had to run a 12V windlass... less loss etc.

??Thoughts?? am i silly for even considering this?
Your solution would be significantly more expensive and less reliable than simply installing a 12V windlass. Your call
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Old 05-06-2013, 21:34   #6
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Re: 12 -> 24 Volt converter

For what it will cost for 12 volt cables, or even the cost for 24 volt cables and the 5 to 10% voltage loss you will get, local 12 volt batteries at the winch will be cheaper and give better results. With only a few feet of heavy gauge cable your voltage losses will be minimal.

A Combiner100 will isolate the winch battery and keep it charged from the starting battery. You only need 10 gauge cables for charging at a fraction of the cost of 00 cables. This assumes you have space for the batteries forward and the weight is not a problem.
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Old 09-06-2013, 10:45   #7
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Re: 12 -> 24 Volt converter

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Originally Posted by Andina Marie View Post
For what it will cost for 12 volt cables, or even the cost for 24 volt cables and the 5 to 10% voltage loss you will get, local 12 volt batteries at the winch will be cheaper and give better results.
I installed a 12v 1 kw QUICK windlass on a boat last month, and the installation manual spec'ed #2 AWG cable, not #00 ... but yeah, even so, the #2 cable can approach the total cost of thinner #10 cable plus an additional 12 battery and a combiner... but then you have the added maintenance of an extra battery and the combiner to worry about.

If a person was cruising extensively and anchoring a few times a week, the extra battery might be justified and would provide some battery redundancy; otherwise... for the person who only anchors a few to several times a season, the simpler "heavy wire" solution might be the better choice.
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