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Old 13-07-2018, 06:44   #31
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Re: Hurricane staying aboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by belizesailor View Post
Yeah, Ive sailed in up to Cat 1 conditions (65, gusting 85kts)...that was quite enough for me...dont ever care to do that again...and certainly nothing stronger.

I was offshore in that case and had no option but to deal with it, but if at anchor...Im on the next flight outta town!
I have experienced strong winds but never that much. As I said if things look too nasty I will make a run south, my boat is my home and I will protect it.

Haul-out is in January so no worries there.

Other than that I watch the weather this time of year and plan accordingly.
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Old 14-07-2018, 08:02   #32
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Re: Hurricane staying aboard

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Originally Posted by Capt.Ty View Post
I am new to life aboard a boat and I am going to be riding out storms on the boat I need guidance tips and advice. I am currently anchored in Englewood Florida on a 34 ft morgan. I was thinking about moving down to the keys if anyone knows of any hurricane holes in the areas that would be awesome as well!
If you have ever survived a direct hit by a powerful hurricane you would understand that riding out such a storm on a boat will only earn you a Darwin Award.

Look at the pictures of the harbors in St Martin after last year's storms. There were NO boats left floating. None. Including boats a lot bigger and better built than a Morgan 34. Yours is not special. You would have died.
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Old 20-07-2018, 07:41   #33
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Re: Hurricane staying aboard

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Originally Posted by belizesailor View Post
Personally, I think its very foolish to willing stay aboard a boat in the path of a hurricane. There is very little you can physically do in major hurricane conditions anyway...except pray not to die. No boat is worth risking my life for...are you willing to die for yours?
In my other recent life as a Morgan 462 owner and cruiser, both the boat and I survived three hurricanes in two years. In all instances I prepared the boat by removing ALL sails and moveable canvas/deck gear, sunk the Dinghy and sealed ALL ports with duct tape.

In one instance I anchored the boat in a deep tidal creak surrounded by a South Carolina salt marsh using 4 anchors all deployed off the bow and two all chain rodes plus four snubber lines. The boat survived without a scratch.

In the other two instances I prepped the boat as above but left her tied in a “cats cradle” of lines at a well engineered well protected floating dock marina. Again she survived without a scratch.

Common to both instances 1) I prepped the boat and dinghyway beyond what others around me had done. 2) I left the boat to fend for itself.
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Old 20-07-2018, 07:43   #34
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Re: Hurricane staying aboard

I have spent thousands of nights on the hook, over 40+ years, and been through well over 20 hurricanes.

I recommend my book, even to monohullers. It goes into detail about how to hunker down for even a cat 4!


“Anchoring and Mooring the Cruising Multihull”, available in paperback or as an E book, from Amazon.
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Old 20-07-2018, 07:53   #35
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Re: Hurricane staying aboard

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Originally Posted by billknny View Post
If you have ever survived a direct hit by a powerful hurricane you would understand that riding out such a storm on a boat will only earn you a Darwin Award.

Look at the pictures of the harbors in St Martin after last year's storms. There were NO boats left floating. None. Including boats a lot bigger and better built than a Morgan 34. Yours is not special. You would have died.
This is indeed the myth, but if you are willing and able, there IS a lot you can do in a hurricane to save your boat, as I have over 20 times.

I have even gone out in a Cat 4, 9 times, doing the side stroke with a flashlight over my head, to save my boat! I saved her, and 4 others in that storm!


Since my boat took me 10 years to build, the effort required to build another boat was far more likely to get me killed, than the hurricane was!


To know the skills required:
Read, “Anchoring and Mooring the Cruising Multihull”, in paper back or as an E book, from Amazon. (By Mark Johnson)


That truism of “there is nothing that you can do in a hurricane”, is only true of folks lacking the strength, courage, and skills to save their boat!
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Old 20-07-2018, 08:01   #36
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Re: Hurricane staying aboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Johnson View Post
This is indeed the myth, but if you are willing and able, there IS a lot you can do in a hurricane to save your boat, as I have over 20 times.

I have even gone out in a Cat 4, 9 times, doing the side stroke with a flashlight over my head, to save my boat! I saved her, and 4 others in that storm!

Since my boat took me 10 years to build, the effort required to build another boat was far more likely to get me killed, than the hurricane was!

To know the skills required:
Read, “Anchoring and Mooring the Cruising Multihull”, in paper back or as an E book, from Amazon. (By Mark Johnson)

That truism of “there is nothing that you can do in a hurricane”, is only true of folks lacking the strength, courage, and skills to save their boat!
Sir with all due respect, riding out a Hurricans is a fools earrand and a quick way to wind up dead or worse.

I have faced down numerous insurgents in battle and there was always a point to cut and run, to call in a QRT (Quick Reaction Force) Arty and Air Support.

A Hurrican dosen't care if your are brave or stupid, watch the weather and if you even suspect a storm is coming your way head south or get the boat on the hard. Then strip her bare and strap her down before getting yourself out of harms way.
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Old 20-07-2018, 08:04   #37
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Re: Hurricane staying aboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mainstreet View Post
In my other recent life as a Morgan 462 owner and cruiser, both the boat and I survived three hurricanes in two years. In all instances I prepared the boat by removing ALL sails and moveable canvas/deck gear, sunk the Dinghy and sealed ALL ports with duct tape.

In one instance I anchored the boat in a deep tidal creak surrounded by a South Carolina salt marsh using 4 anchors all deployed off the bow and two all chain rodes plus four snubber lines. The boat survived without a scratch.

In the other two instances I prepped the boat as above but left her tied in a “cats cradle” of lines at a well engineered well protected floating dock marina. Again she survived without a scratch.

Common to both instances 1) I prepped the boat and dinghyway beyond what others around me had done. 2) I left the boat to fend for itself.
Maybe you misunderstood my post. I didnt say there was nothing you could do to prepare for a major hurricane, I said there was little you could do while aboard the boat in hurricane conditions.

Absolutely prep the boat well, as you described in your post, ....then get outta town!
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Old 20-07-2018, 08:05   #38
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Re: Hurricane staying aboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by belizesailor View Post
Maybe you misunderstood my post. I didnt say there was nothing you could do to prepare for a major hurricane, I said there was little you could do while aboard the boat in hurricane conditions.

Absolutely prep the boat well, as you described in your post, ....then get outta town!
Agreed!!!!!
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Old 20-07-2018, 08:09   #39
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Re: Hurricane staying aboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Johnson View Post
This is indeed the myth, but if you are willing and able, there IS a lot you can do in a hurricane to save your boat, as I have over 20 times.

I have even gone out in a Cat 4, 9 times, doing the side stroke with a flashlight over my head, to save my boat! I saved her, and 4 others in that storm!


Since my boat took me 10 years to build, the effort required to build another boat was far more likely to get me killed, than the hurricane was!


To know the skills required:
Read, “Anchoring and Mooring the Cruising Multihull”, in paper back or as an E book, from Amazon. (By Mark Johnson)


That truism of “there is nothing that you can do in a hurricane”, is only true of folks lacking the strength, courage, and skills to save their boat!
Your boat. Your life. Your call.

Me, Im not going to risk my life for ANY inanimate object. To try to safe a life, maybe (depending on circumstances), a boat, no.
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Old 20-07-2018, 08:23   #40
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Re: Hurricane staying aboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by TigerPaws View Post
Sir with all due respect, riding out a Hurricans is a fools earrand and a quick way to wind up dead or worse.

I have faced down numerous insurgents in battle and there was always a point to cut and run, to call in a QRT (Quick Reaction Force) Arty and Air Support.

A Hurrican dosen't care if your are brave or stupid, watch the weather and if you even suspect a storm is coming your way head south or get the boat on the hard. Then strip her bare and strap her down before getting yourself out of harms way.
You must have insurance (which I never did) as for a self built boat like mine, it is almost impossible to get. You must also not have spent 10 years OFTEN at great risk, building your boat. (Like lowering the engine down, or climbing hundreds of rigs professionally) You must ALSO lack what it takes emotionally to do WHAT EVER is necessary to save your boat...

I have done it over 20 times, and yes, it is dangerous, but less so than building another boat, or riding a motorcycle... IF you have the skills, it can be relatively safe. It WILL scare the **** out of anyone.


I always opt FIRST to go somewhere else, or at least spiderweb off in the mangroves, a canal, up a VERY tight creek, or a marina basin as a last option.


I can swim out an extra LARGE Fortress anchor in 140 mph winds if necessary, but prefer to just go defensive and OVER prepare if I can not run away. It is not about being foolhardy, it is about 40 years of living on or with a boat in the H belt (off and on), and having developed the skills.


At least half of the truisms out there are not true, and this is one of them. I can tell, however, that you lack what it takes to keep your boat where you put it, probably have insurance, and would fly out of town, leaving your boat marginally secured to crush mine!


By far... the biggest risk, is protection from other folks who do not know how to anchor their boat for that overnight gale, or for a hurricane.


For anyone wanting the skills, and there is OFTEN no other option... read my book.
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Old 20-07-2018, 08:36   #41
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Re: Hurricane staying aboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Johnson View Post
You must have insurance (which I never did) as for a self built boat like mine, it is almost impossible to get. You must also not have spent 10 years OFTEN at great risk, building your boat. (Like lowering the engine down, or climbing hundreds of rigs professionally) You must ALSO lack what it takes emotionally to do WHAT EVER is necessary to save your boat...

I have done it over 20 times, and yes, it is dangerous, but less so than building another boat, or riding a motorcycle... IF you have the skills, it can be relatively safe. It WILL scare the **** out of anyone.


I always opt FIRST to go somewhere else, or at least spiderweb off in the mangroves, a canal, up a VERY tight creek, or a marina basin as a last option.


I can swim out an extra LARGE Fortress anchor in 140 mph winds if necessary, but prefer to just go defensive and OVER prepare if I can not run away. It is not about being foolhardy, it is about 40 years of living on or with a boat in the H belt (off and on), and having developed the skills.


At least half of the truisms out there are not true, and this is one of them. I can tell, however, that you lack what it takes to keep your boat where you put it, probably have insurance, and would fly out of town, leaving your boat marginally secured to crush mine!


By far... the biggest risk, is protection from other folks who do not know how to anchor their boat for that overnight gale, or for a hurricane.


For anyone wanting the skills, and there is OFTEN no other option... read my book.
We had 6 or 8 hurricanes in Pensacola where we would watch the anchored boats seeing which one would eventually drag anchor and end up in the low bridge.

Then it was how long until the mast breaks off. Some of the guys in the group had boats anchored here

We'd be drinking at 9 am since there was no power and we had been up much of the night.

This was before 2004 and the stronger hurricanes that now seem to be the norm

The spot where we used to watch the boats from at our apartment during hurricanes was under 8' of water during the 2004 hurricane which was Ivan

All 25 boats are so that were anchored in the so called hurricane hole were destroyed except one. A floating dock still with some of it's boats came thru like a gigantic bowling ball and took out the boats. The dock had been lifted over it's pilings by the surge

There were many tornadoes that came through with the hurricane. Some homes were nothing more than a pile of a few sticks/2x4's

A guy at work anchored his boat in another spot. It took him a week to find it after the storm.

The authorities were allowing no one in the water right after due to debris etc

The surge was near 18' in some places. No power for a couple weeks for some. The surge also lifted out a section of the I-10 Bridge. One tractor trailer went into the bay.

http://wuwf.org/post/looking-back-iv...tate-10-bridge

In 2005, Katrina brought in a surge of 26'!

You may want to reconsider staying with you boat during a REAL hurricane.

https://www.pnj.com/story/news/histo...ries/15623699/
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Old 20-07-2018, 08:43   #42
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Re: Hurricane staying aboard

Take a look at Calusa Island Marina in Goodland FL, most southern town on west coast of FL. Based on what happened in 2017 Hurricane season, consider only the inner harbor where you tie up to vertical seawall. Based on a discussion with someone with a cat in the inner harbor last year, the outer harbor where there are floating docks had damage to both docks and boats, while boats in inner harbor had no damage. google map satellite view showed some of the outer harbor damage, but map may have been refreshed. Cost per month should be around $350.
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Old 20-07-2018, 08:46   #43
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Re: Hurricane staying aboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Johnson View Post
You must have insurance (which I never did) as for a self built boat like mine, it is almost impossible to get. You must also not have spent 10 years OFTEN at great risk, building your boat. (Like lowering the engine down, or climbing hundreds of rigs professionally) You must ALSO lack what it takes emotionally to do WHAT EVER is necessary to save your boat...

Sir you are assuming that others do not have the skill, the will or the intestinal fortitude to set-up for and ride out a storm.

You are WRONG.

Have you ever stared down 20 heavily armed enemy insurgents in battle? Been shot, plugged a bullet wound in your leg with your hand? Called in a Danger Close fire mission on your own position? Held a 20 year old under your command while the life drained out of him after being nearly blown in half?

I highly doubt it

I have done it over 20 times, and yes, it is dangerous, but less so than building another boat, or riding a motorcycle... IF you have the skills, it can be relatively safe. It WILL scare the **** out of anyone.

I always opt FIRST to go somewhere else, or at least spiderweb off in the mangroves, a canal, up a VERY tight creek, or a marina basin as a last option.

I can swim out an extra LARGE Fortress anchor in 140 mph winds if necessary, but prefer to just go defensive and OVER prepare if I can not run away. It is not about being foolhardy, it is about 40 years of living on or with a boat in the H belt (off and on), and having developed the skills.

You need to remember that not everyone has the physical capability to do as you say that you have done, some of us are in our mid 60's with health limitations.

At least half of the truisms out there are not true, and this is one of them. I can tell, however, that you lack what it takes to keep your boat where you put it, probably have insurance, and would fly out of town, leaving your boat marginally secured to crush mine!

Insurance? YES! To be without is foolhardy, much like riding out a Hurricane.

By far... the biggest risk, is protection from other folks who do not know how to anchor their boat for that overnight gale, or for a hurricane.

On this we can agree.

For anyone wanting the skills, and there is OFTEN no other option... read my book.
Sounds to me like you are promoting your book more than sound advise.
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Old 20-07-2018, 08:46   #44
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Re: Hurricane staying aboard

I always said that if a Hurricane came toward me i Ingleside On The Bay, Tx I would stay in my home and make sure the boat, a 36 foot Gulfstar Sailboat, was well tied in the canal. IOTB is a hurricane hole and my house sits on the "highest salt washed bluff" on the gulf coast of America at 43 feet ASL. Safe enough, right?
Well, as Harvey approached last August, I was prepared to do just that. Then about 12 hours before it hit I changed my mind because my wife of 58 years was having a bit of trouble with a "Slight cold" and breathing. We decided to leave at 10 that morning. Went to Austin 120 miles inland, to stay with my daughter. The next morning my wife went into the hospital for a 5 day stay and Oxygen. That would not have been available for three weeks had we stayed home.
The house was unhurt and the boat was unhurt though the left side of the eye passed directly over them. There was no Electricity, Hospital, for three weeks after the hurricane. My wife would have died. I will not stay if another hurricane greater than Cat 2 approaches. NOT WORTH IT.
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Old 20-07-2018, 09:08   #45
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Re: Hurricane staying aboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by thomm225 View Post
We had 6 or 8 hurricanes in Pensacola where we would watch the anchored boats seeing which one would eventually drag anchor and end up in the low bridge.

Then it was how long until the mast breaks off. Some of the guys in the group had boats anchored here

We'd be drinking at 9 am since there was no power and we had been up much of the night.

This was before 2004 and the stronger hurricanes that now seem to be the norm

The spot where we used to watch the boats from at our apartment during hurricanes was under 8' of water during the 2004 hurricane which was Ivan

All 25 boats are so that were anchored in the so called hurricane hole were destroyed except one. A floating dock still with some of it's boats came thru like a gigantic bowling ball and took out the boats. The dock had been lifted over it's pilings by the surge

There were many tornadoes that came through with the hurricane. Some homes were nothing more than a pile of a few sticks/2x4's

A guy at work anchored his boat in another spot. It took him a week to find it after the storm.

The authorities were allowing no one in the water right after due to debris etc

The surge was near 18' in some places. No power for a couple weeks for some. The surge also lifted out a section of the I-10 Bridge. One tractor trailer went into the bay.

Looking Back: Ivan vs. the Interstate 10 Bridge | WUWF

In 2005, Katrina brought in a surge of 26'!

You may want to reconsider staying with you boat during a REAL hurricane.

https://www.pnj.com/story/news/histo...ries/15623699/
I was in Pensacola for Hurricane Ivan, (the year before Katrina) which was just 1 mph shy of a cat 4, and WORSE than H Katrina, except we only had a 14’ storm surge, and in Katrina the surge was much worse because of the lay of the land. Ivan had been a 4 or 5 longer than any storm EVER, generating the largest verifiable waves at sea ever recorded.


In H Ivan, (Bayou Chico) I prepared and saved all 4 of the boat’s required to save my boat, or to help friends save theirs.


I had 21 lines on my boat, and staying on shore about 500’ away, swam out 9 times to loosen my lines (under water) as the surge came in. I also secured the boats directly upwind if me.


MY PILINGS WERE PURPOSELY, 12’ out from my boat! Any slip must be twice as large as the boat, minimum!


In the worst of it, the house I was staying in was filling full of water, and I walked with armpit deep water a block, to the only stilt house near by.


Of the 200 or so boats on our hardest hit side, all but a few ended up in their yard! All but a few of the 60 + anchored out boats did as well.


Two of those I saved were anchored out, and were boats I had secured before the storm. One (a Searunner 34 sistership trimaran), was in 3’ of water, on the far end of the Bayou, so shallow that it took weeks to get a tide that would float her out. It too, was undamaged except for the bent wind vane.


If you really want to save your boat, all it takes is the skills, and a willingness to do it. I did, In winds gusting to over 150 mph!


The entire story, is in my book as well, and exactly how to make a three anchor hurricane mooring, which I have used many times.
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