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Old 24-04-2008, 05:39   #46
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A nice simple set up we used, whiched worked at anchor or moored to a dok was to have a few small rape alarms, these could be mounted inside or outside with a gishing line as a triop wire or attached to a half open hatch. Anyone who tried to board or open a hatch further would activate the alarm.

If they are not put off at that stage then they would have come aboard whatever, the next step is to have a vhf handy so that you could inform them you had called the authorities or other boats. Then have two stashes of money credit cards, I kept old out of date cards with some cash and an old passport so it looked real.

Hand over anything they want and you will hopefully survive to sail again, fight and people end up seriously injured or dead. Which could be you or the bad guy. Personally I would not want to kill anyone, trying to explain without witnesses that you killed for good reason could mean spending a long time in a foreign jail.

Good luck and be careful, its really not that dangerous out there.
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Old 25-04-2008, 14:19   #47
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If there are no witnesses did anyone really get killed?........m
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Old 27-04-2008, 17:20   #48
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Beware of scams in the martial arts training. Some , like traditional karate ,are as useless in the real world , as trying to win a fight with ballet dancing.
Boxing and wrestling are reality based.
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Old 27-04-2008, 20:21   #49
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Neither boxing nor wrestling coaches will tell you "OK, here are the xx ways to kill a man with one blow, here are the blows to do that with." But for self-defense training (as opposed to sports) that's the basis of the training and something any master will teach any earnest student.

Can you kill an opponent before they can damage you, in wrestling? What, grapple them and break their back? Those are martial sports (the Olympics are entirely from the martial combat training and practice) but hardly in the same league.

Boxing? Well, hardly if you stick to the Queensbury rules.

But a quiet little rundown old dojo, with no glitz, usually will be run by someone worth calling Master. If it isn't at least tinged with spirituality...Big chains with fancy posters and teams...uh-uh, that's your ballet school. Great sport, but no longer self defense.
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Old 03-05-2008, 08:05   #50
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Fascinating thread! Here's some views from a kindred female boater. Have been cruising single handed for many years (over fifteen now- started out young) with little trouble so far. Have come across seedy characters in various ports and it seems that they are more encouraged to try something if the potential target projects timidity or no confidence. Lack of fear and a non-exaggerated, take-no-crap-from-others attitude really shows in one's walk and body language. It's how you carry yourself I guess. Ashore, the "bad guy" will often gauge a potential victim first by attempting eye contact and then go from there. Smiling at him or timid body language opens the door for his next move. Showing no fear in one's walk and the right eye/facial language can make him reconsider and find an easier target. At least that's been my experience, especially walking alone in downtown Detroit, MI, during my college days. No one bothered me beyond the initial size-me-up stares or attempts to ask for spare change. I'm a short woman too! I'm not a pacifist when it comes to self defense, and ashore I carry a sailing knife that flicks open one-handed, but no gun. No, it's not that I'm looking or expecting trouble, but the knife is always so handy for opening things, cutting limes for drinks and basic useful tasks. Onboard, a flare gun would probably scare someone off and I've seen a lone, older woman in an anchorage fire one at a guy who was trying to steal her dinghy in the middle of the night in the Caribbean area. He didn't get the dinghy. She also used her spotlight (blinding!)
In remote anchorages, no one has yet attempted to board my own vessel, but if they did, they'd be ringing one or more bells by pulling on dinghy's painter, lifelines, bowprit area and cockpit area. That's enough to wake me up or just alert me to something that's amiss. Each situation's different and who knows if an intruder is armed, but one can't be afraid to take quick, indecisive action or inflict damage on a person showing bad intentions to protect one's life/property.
Though I sail alone, I do befriend fellow cruisers traveling in the same area and we watch out for each other and keep in contact. That's a helpful security thing too. Caravan cruising with other boats is also a great thing if you can do it. Also, I avoid walking around seedy areas at night and walk in a social group with others if in questionable areas. That last time in Mexico off the beaten path was a bit scary! Clothing is boringly plain with no hints of expensive jewelry or a fat wallet. Alone in my dinghy, carry a handheld VHF and avoid night time travel to and from dock unless I know it's in a safe area or have other boaters with me. This stuff is just common street sense and not paranoia or anything. Even lone male boaters I know do these general precautions as well.
Rebecca
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Old 03-05-2008, 11:00   #51
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Good practical advice for everyone Rebecca..... Thanks!
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Old 03-05-2008, 11:35   #52
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The only female specific thing I can think to add is maybe buy some obvious guy clothes and hang them on the life lines as if drying. Might discourage a casual scumbug...

On a similar note, decks full of toys often ensure a little elbow room in crowded anchorages. Though I wouldn't suggest faking it as you do tend to attract other breeders.
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Old 03-05-2008, 11:48   #53
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Very good advice, Rebecca. Detroit taught you a lot. NYC taught me mine.

I also carry a small, folding knife when I'm out on land. It's funny though. I carry it less for people and more for dogs. Seems everybody has a dog these days and some of them are not so friendly if they are out loose and on the prowl. I've run into a couple mean ones in my time. Lunging at them usually scared them off, but someday that one pitbull probably won't be scared. So... I have a knife mostly for that type of situation.

With people, I do exactly as you do. Avoid all bad/dangerous situations.

Quote:
Originally Posted by s/vAngel View Post
Fascinating thread! Here's some views from a kindred female boater. Have been cruising single handed for many years (over fifteen now- started out young) with little trouble so far. Have come across seedy characters in various ports and it seems that they are more encouraged to try something if the potential target projects timidity or no confidence. Lack of fear and a non-exaggerated, take-no-crap-from-others attitude really shows in one's walk and body language. It's how you carry yourself I guess. Ashore, the "bad guy" will often gauge a potential victim first by attempting eye contact and then go from there. Smiling at him or timid body language opens the door for his next move. Showing no fear in one's walk and the right eye/facial language can make him reconsider and find an easier target. At least that's been my experience, especially walking alone in downtown Detroit, MI, during my college days. No one bothered me beyond the initial size-me-up stares or attempts to ask for spare change. I'm a short woman too! I'm not a pacifist when it comes to self defense, and ashore I carry a sailing knife that flicks open one-handed, but no gun. No, it's not that I'm looking or expecting trouble, but the knife is always so handy for opening things, cutting limes for drinks and basic useful tasks. Onboard, a flare gun would probably scare someone off and I've seen a lone, older woman in an anchorage fire one at a guy who was trying to steal her dinghy in the middle of the night in the Caribbean area. He didn't get the dinghy. She also used her spotlight (blinding!)
In remote anchorages, no one has yet attempted to board my own vessel, but if they did, they'd be ringing one or more bells by pulling on dinghy's painter, lifelines, bowprit area and cockpit area. That's enough to wake me up or just alert me to something that's amiss. Each situation's different and who knows if an intruder is armed, but one can't be afraid to take quick, indecisive action or inflict damage on a person showing bad intentions to protect one's life/property.
Though I sail alone, I do befriend fellow cruisers traveling in the same area and we watch out for each other and keep in contact. That's a helpful security thing too. Caravan cruising with other boats is also a great thing if you can do it. Also, I avoid walking around seedy areas at night and walk in a social group with others if in questionable areas. That last time in Mexico off the beaten path was a bit scary! Clothing is boringly plain with no hints of expensive jewelry or a fat wallet. Alone in my dinghy, carry a handheld VHF and avoid night time travel to and from dock unless I know it's in a safe area or have other boaters with me. This stuff is just common street sense and not paranoia or anything. Even lone male boaters I know do these general precautions as well.
Rebecca
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Old 03-05-2008, 12:11   #54
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I also carry a small, folding knife when I'm out on land. It's funny though. I carry it less for people and more for dogs. Seems everybody has a dog these days and some of them are not so friendly if they are out loose and on the prowl.
It's true when I was younger(25 years ago) I used to do a lot of long distance cycling, and dogs were the bigest threat.
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Old 07-05-2008, 00:04   #55
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safety for women

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Neither boxing nor wrestling coaches will tell you "OK, here are the xx ways to kill a man with one blow, here are the blows to do that with." But for self-defense training (as opposed to sports) that's the basis of the training and something any master will teach any earnest student.

Can you kill an opponent before they can damage you, in wrestling? What, grapple them and break their back? Those are martial sports (the Olympics are entirely from the martial combat training and practice) but hardly in the same league.

Boxing? Well, hardly if you stick to the Queensbury rules.

But a quiet little rundown old dojo, with no glitz, usually will be run by someone worth calling Master. If it isn't at least tinged with spirituality...Big chains with fancy posters and teams...uh-uh, that's your ballet school. Great sport, but no longer self defense.

It is totally wishful thinking to believe you are going to kill anyone with one blow. People who tell you that are self delusional, or outright liars. That is hollywood, not reality. A naked choke hold will kill in a minute or two. Arm bars tear out ligaments.
Men tend to try grab women so that they can easily get into grapling situations if they are not carefull enough to avoid them.
Do whatever the rules , Queenbury or other, forbid. People who want rules should keep it in the gym.
The confidence you gain from a bit of boxing and westling will usually deter a slimeball who is looking for signs of weakness.
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Old 07-05-2008, 08:32   #56
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Louis, if you have ever seen a man doubled-over in pain after being kicked in balls, then you must admit you have seen the effectiveness of one blow. Unfortunately, that might the wrong place to hit a bad guy since it is likely to piss him off without being sure of stopping him.

You say Hollywood, I say a "reasonably effective expedient" Not as effective as a shotgun at ten feet, not effective against the 1% of the bad guys who may be martial artists able to parry that first unexpected blow, but in the real-not-Hollywood world? More effective more often than any other options that may be at hand.

You'd be taught the same blows, for the same reason, in military unarmed combat. Not because they will always work--but because they work more often than boxing and wrestling and grappling and proving how macho you are while you stand in a ring and exchange damages.

If someone needs to learn some self-defense FAST, and not start a lifestyle change and a training regime, the best thing they can do is learn something reasonably simple, reasonably effective, most of the time.

And of course, get reasonably secure companionway and hatches, which are easier still.
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Old 07-05-2008, 12:41   #57
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Like I said in my post, do whatever the rules don't allow.
Boxing and wrestling help protect you from the most likely and dangerouse adversary, illness from inactivity diseases. I do boxing workouts aboard with a double end bag, far more potentially useful than three step aerobics.More fun , and thus more likely to be continued .
Aluminium hatches, locked fom the inside , take a lot of time and serious tools to break thru. The best way to lock them when you are not aboard is to reach thru a nearby port and lock them with a padlock from the inside. That way no one can see that you are not aboard , buy the presense of an easily breakable padlock in clear view. The lock lasts longer as well.
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Old 07-06-2008, 01:48   #58
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A little can of pepper foam can go an INCREDIBLY long way...
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Old 06-07-2008, 05:01   #59
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what about a flash bang as used by swat to dis orate the offenders.
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Old 06-07-2008, 06:09   #60
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It is totally wishful thinking to believe you are going to kill anyone with one blow. People who tell you that are self delusional, or outright liars.
Look up "Wing Chun" (aka "Wing Tsun"). As part of the art - students are a taught to deliver open handed strikes to the throat - thereby rendering their opponent's death. The art was originated by a Chinese woman thousands of years ago - to fight against larger & stronger opponents (war lord's) by using their energy against them. It was also taught to Student/Master "Bruce Lee"[1] (whom founded "Jeet Kune Do" & was also a boxer & sword fencer) by Master "Yip Man". Another good art is "Aikido". Personally, this art fascinates me for its ability to remove weapons from an attacker (i.e. knives, swords, guns etc) in close quarters.

Btw: the first art I studied - my Sensa (teacher) was a former boxer (& very good at it), go figure I'm not putting down boxing (as I use some of those techniques myself) - as you do gain muscle strength & learn some good skills, but one should never keep their mind closed to different fighting styles & arts. This sort of attitude is what separates a good fighter from a poor fighter, why? Because he underestimates his opponent's abilities.

[1] Bruce Lee always called himself a Student/Master due to the fact that although he was a Master - he was in-fact always learning (i.e. a student). Since his death, many former opponents have come forward expressing that he was in-fact the "real deal" (i.e. not a Hollywood fake).
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