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Old 29-04-2012, 15:08   #46
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Having done several transatlantics. One or two very rough. I can say that you can always cook. Survival storms are of course different. But these are typically 48 hours and you eat what's at hand. I've still managed to boil water ( but be careful) . I with the OP that's likes an occasional big fry up in bad weather , bacon eggs, blood pudding the works. Settles the stomach. Lol ( rumour has it an Irish fry has 3750000 calories)

On long journeys I would never rely on prepared freezer food. Too risky , loose the freezer and you have a mutiny. Equally there no need. You have half the day to prepare the main meal so you can make it from scratch. If I'm able to provision good meat, I'll make stews, beef bourginon , beef strog. Pasta dishes, curries etc. I try to avoid eating from cans.

I sure as most long distance sailors find, food and meals become really important. It's the big focus of the crew each day, woe betide its crap stuff. You do really need to learn to cook well to satisfy a good long distance crew. In most weather cobdirions right up to survival the galley can be used. Remember you've loads of time. We try even of eating from bowls to have three courses for main dinner. Lunch is usually sandwiches salad bits, breakfast is generally self help. we always try to have meals together a it's a social occasion.

Of ourselves in survival stoms it's eat what's at hand, cheese is good, chocolate , cakes , open misc tins etc.

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Old 30-04-2012, 01:13   #47
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Re: Storm Foods?

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Originally Posted by goboatingnow View Post
....

On long journeys I would never rely on prepared freezer food. Too risky , loose the freezer and you have a mutiny. ......

......
Dave
We have 2 very large freezer lockers, as well as a small freezer compartment in the upright fridge. All 3 units operate completely independently. Hardly likely that all 3 will fail at the same time.

Different strokes for different folks. Different boats; different situations. I positively cannot imagine provisioning for an ocean crossing without a freezer. Lots of our friends manage to do this. They end up eating some strange food combinations. Not for us.

Judy
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Old 30-04-2012, 06:38   #48
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Re: Storm Foods?

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Dont laugh ,but plain old peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are easy to make and are very settling for a queasy stomach. I bet that I dont eat 2 a year on land, but they are good quick energy in bad weather or the first day or 2 of a passage, so I always try to have PB&J handy on a boat. ______Grant.
Got to agree. PB is a go to food in nasty weatheror any weather really. Not only for a PB & J sandwhich. Good on a banana or apple too. Even good to thicken up a Cup of Noodles on a cold watch. Might be a good idea to include a jar in a ditch bag too.
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Old 30-04-2012, 08:01   #49
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Re: Storm Foods?

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Make up big batches of your own trail mix according to your likes, diet and allergies. Just make sure you have a good balance of dried fruits, nuts and a starch such as popcorn or Cheerios. Pack in snack bags by the cupful to keep it fresh and handy. Grab and go. Hard-boiled eggs are another lifesaver so make plenty of them ahead before the blow hits. I blog trail mix recipes at CreateAGorp.
Hmm... I belong to the camp that finds "trail mix" pretty difficult to enjoy! I can like it in small doses and will eat more if desperate but can't say I enjoy it.

No one has mentioned Biltong or Jerky, any reason why not???

FWIW, I am planning to experiment with homemade pemican, can't be worse than trail mix for me!

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most folks ask what is Grits..yall have grits down under?what about fat back?...DVC
Steady on old chap, you are talking to an educated man here and no we don't do Grits down under. We also speak proper and thus use "back fat" to describe your "fat back". However I do confess that side meat threw me
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Old 30-04-2012, 08:36   #50
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Originally Posted by Tortuga's Lie
OK, back to the topic......
I went home....rooted through the recipes.....couldn't find it......must be on the boat. Well this is what I can remember from it, I think I got it all. I tried to upload the file but it said "invalid file"??? Must not like M.S.Word.

Mediterranean Chicken with Couscous

4 large boneless chicken breasts
1 tablespoon of olive oil
1 med. Yellow onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 red bell pepper, diced
1 cup plain couscous
1 cup raisins, crazins (sp?) or dried currants
14 oz can of chicken broth
Zest of one lemon
Juice of one lemon
14 oz can of chick peas, drained (you can substitute pine nuts)
1 ½ tablespoon of either curry powder or turmeric, whichever is handy. It varies the flavor, but both are good.
Salt and pepper to taste


In a large stock pot, boil chicken breasts until cooked through. Drain and let cool. Cube chicken into ¾ “ chunks. You can reserve liquid to substitute for broth but since there is no skin, it won’t be as flavorful…..use a can of broth

While the chicken is cooking, sauté the garlic in the oil, med heat, then add onions. Once onions are translucent, add red peppers. Sauté for three to four minutes until peppers are tender. Add lemon juice, zest, curry powder or turmeric, couscous, chick peas and raisins. Stir until blended then add chicken broth, cover and simmer for 5 minutes.

Once ready, stir in chicken cubes season with salt and pepper to taste. You can serve hot or cold.
On a boat, it will keep well in a Tupperware for several days in the fridge.
YUM. This sounds great - thanks!

If we don't want to prepare food because of rough weather, we eat jerky, saltines, PB and whatever vehicle is on hand 😊, pumpkin seed bars (goraw.com - these are a bit pricey but I love 'em), ginger snaps, pretzels, carrots, dried fruit (or fresh if we have it), cottage cheese....
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Old 30-04-2012, 09:36   #51
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Re: Storm Foods?

We have a recipe for Mulligatawny soup that sounds a lot like Tortuga's Lie's recipe, but also includes diced apples. Being a soup, there's no couscous.
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Old 30-04-2012, 19:29   #52
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Side meat is unsmoked bacon, or better said, it's what the chunks of pork side meat, thats left over after the bacon is cut off to smoke!! Good and greasy and tasty!! I don't cook eggs when it's real rough, cus I don't like broken egg yokes(someone asked where the eggs were?) Connie can't even stand to be below when I cook stuff like this when its ROUGH !! But it's an old PNW fishermans breakfast, at least 40 50 yrs ago it was ! LOL
We call that fresh side...way good in sandwiches with mustard or horseradish...now I am hungry.
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Old 30-04-2012, 19:50   #53
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Re: Storm Foods?

I take a tin of beans, dice up some pickles, and toss in some diced spam or tuna fish. Season to taste and serve in a bowl cold with a spoon.
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Old 30-04-2012, 21:31   #54
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Re: Storm Foods?

I like casseroles and lassagana(sp?) that you can just pop in the oven. We have frozen ones that we save for rough weather. Then at the end of the trip if we haven't had a storm we have a nice dinner.
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Old 01-05-2012, 00:47   #55
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Re: Storm Foods?

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Good on a banana
Ant Bananas meant to course sea sickness??
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Old 01-05-2012, 12:19   #56
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Re: Storm Foods?

Some years ago I read a book by a single hander who provisioned with nothing more than (as I recall) dried apricots, stoned wheat crackers and one other item, perhaps almonds. Anyone recall the book?
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Old 01-05-2012, 13:14   #57
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Re: Storm Foods?

Peanut butter AND anything OR nothing....EXTRA EXTRA crunchy
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Old 01-05-2012, 13:23   #58
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Re: Storm Foods?

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We have 2 very large freezer lockers, as well as a small freezer compartment in the upright fridge. All 3 units operate completely independently. Hardly likely that all 3 will fail at the same time.

Different strokes for different folks. Different boats; different situations. I positively cannot imagine provisioning for an ocean crossing without a freezer. Lots of our friends manage to do this. They end up eating some strange food combinations. Not for us.

Judy
How can they possibly manage NO freezer? Poor bastards!
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Old 01-05-2012, 13:47   #59
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Re: Storm Foods?

Fry bread, peanut butter, and honey makes for a useful snack in the cockpit during heavy weather.
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Old 01-05-2012, 21:20   #60
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Fry bread, peanut butter, and honey makes for a useful snack in the cockpit during heavy weather.
+1 as a heavy weather snack.

Or after a sailor has had a bottle (or two) of wine :-)
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