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Old 18-02-2007, 08:29   #256
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Here's a few historically living conditions in the 1500's that are enlighteneing. Some of them may even apply to living on boats today
Enjoy!

LIFE IN THE 1500'S
The next time you are washing your hands and complain because the water
temperature isn't just how you like it, think about how things used to be.
Here are some facts about the1500s:

These are interesting...

Most people got married in June because they took their yearly bath in
May, and still smelled pretty good by June. However, they were starting to
smell, so brides carried a b ouquet of flowers to hide the body odor. Hence
the custom today of carrying a bouquet when getting married.
************************************************** *************************************
Baths consisted of a big tub filled with hot water. The man of the house
had the privilege of the nice clean water, then all the
other sons and men, then the women and finally the children. Last of all
the babies. By then the water was so dirty you could actually lose someone
in it. Hence the saying, Don't throw the baby out with the Bath water..
************************************************** **************************************
Houses had thatched roofs-thick straw-piled high, with no wood underneath.
It was the only place for animals to get warm, so all the cats and other
small animals (mice, bugs) lived in the roof When it rained it became
slippery and sometimes the animals would slip and fall off the roof. Hence
the saying . It's raining cats and dogs.
************************************************** *************************************
There was nothing to stop things from falling into the house.. This posed
a real problem in the bedroom where bugs and other droppings could mess up
your nice clean bed. Hence, a bed with big posts and a sheet hung over the
top afforded some protection. That's how canopy beds came into existence.
The floor was dirt. Only the wealthy had something other than dirt.
Hence the saying, Dirt poor.
************************************************** **************************************
The wealthy had slate floors that would get slippery in the winter when wet, so they
spread thresh (straw) on floor to help keep their footing. As the winter
wore on, they added more thresh until, when you opened the door, it would
all start slipping outside. A piece of wood was placed in the entranceway.
Hence the saying a thresh hold.
************************************************** ***************************************
(Getting quite an education, aren't you?)
************************************************** *************************************
In those old days, they cooked in the kitchen with a big kettle that
always hung over the fire. Every day they lit the fire and added things to
the pot. They ate mostly vegetables and did not get much meat. They would
eat the stew for dinner, leaving leftovers in the pot to get cold
overnight and then start over the next day. Sometimes stew had food in it
that had been there for quite a while. Hence the rhyme, Peas porridge hot,
peas porridge cold, peas porridge in the pot nine days old..
************************************************** ***************************************
Sometimes they could obtain pork, which made them feel quite special. When
visitors came over, they would hang up their bacon to show off. It was a
sign of wealth that a man could, bring home the bacon. They would cut off
a little to share with guests and would all sit around and chew the fat..
************************************************** ********************************** *******
Those with money had plates made of pewter. Food with high acid content
caused some of the lead to leach onto the food, causing lead poisoning
death. This happened most often with tomatoes, so for the next 400 years
or so, tomatoes were considered poisonous.
************************************************** ****************************************
Bread was divided according to status. Workers got the burnt bottom of the
loaf, the family got the middle, and guests got the top, or the upper crust.
************************************************** ****************************************
Lead cups were used to drink ale or whisky. The combination would
sometimes knock the imbibers out for a couple of days .
Someone walking along the road would take them for dead and prepare
them for burial. They were laid out on the kitchen table for a couple of days
and the family would gather around and eat and drink and wait and see if
they would wake up. Hence the custom of holding a wake.
************************************************** ************************************
England is old and small and the local folks started running out of places
to bury people. So they would dig up coffins and would take the bones to
a bone-house, and reuse the grave. When reopening these coffins, 1 out of
25 coffins were found to have scratch marks on the inside and they
realized they had been burying people alive. So they would tie a string on
&nbs p;the wrist of the corpse, lead it through the coffin and up through the
ground and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the
graveyard all night (the graveyard shift.) to listen for the bell; thus,
someone could be, saved by the bell or was considered a ...dead ringer.
************************************************** *******************************************
And that's the truth...Now, whoever said History was boring ! ! !

Educate someone. Share these facts with a friend





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Old 19-02-2007, 01:34   #257
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19 February

  • 1819 - British merchant Captain William Smith sights the South Shetland Islands, and claims them in the name of King George III. (Claim is disputed, with several possible previous discoveries and landings.)
  • 1915 - WWI: Opening salvos of the Battle of Gallipoli begin with British naval bombardment of Turkish artillery in the Dardanelles.
  • 1944 - WWII: U-264 sunk by British sloops HMS Woodpecker and HMS Starling. 52 survivors, no casualties.
  • 1945 - WWII: Opening of the Battle for Iwo Jima.
  • 1986 - U.S. Congress ratifies UN Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide
    • The UN passed the Convention in 1948, and it came into effect in 1951. The U.S. ratified it under the proviso it is immune to prosecution without its consent.
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  • Gabon - Constitution Day (1961, although effectively rewritten in 1991)
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Old 19-02-2007, 07:31   #258
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benny
LIFE IN THE 1500'S
Life in the 1500s - Folk Etymologies

Urban Legends Reference Pages: Language (Life in the 1500s)
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Old 20-02-2007, 08:51   #259
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20 February

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Old 20-02-2007, 10:19   #260
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As an amateur historian specialising in English Social history from the Norman Conquest to the Industrial Revolution I was about to embark on a lenghty tome debunking "Life in the 1500's".

Fortunately, I read the second link above first which does the job every bit as well as I could have (probably better!)

Interestingly, the life of the average "peasant" in the 1500's was in many ways better than our lives today. He/she ate a much healthier diet, worked fewer hours, paid (in equivalent terms) significantly less "tax" and lived in surprising comfort.

Adult life expectancy wasn't that bad either - the very low figures often quoted are heavily skewed by the very much higher infant mortality rate (although even that wasn't as bad as is often suggested in Medieval and Middle Ages times. It got far worse during the 18th and 19th centuries due to the appalling conditions prevalent in the burgeoning towns and cities of the industrial revolution).

If offered the chance to change places with a yeoman of the 15th century I'd have to admit I'd be very tempted!
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Old 20-02-2007, 15:28   #261
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Life in the 1500's was emailed to me by a relative as an entertaining look at what life would possibly be like in the past and sayings that emanated from it and was posted here for that purpose. I should have assumed that without the nth degree of research into it's validity, it would not have passed comment and judgement by those who apparently thrive on flogging a statement or critique made in some of these posts to death - witness the Bumfuzzles.

I am enjoying this forum and the knowledge and experience offered by many members, however, I have already become disenchanted with those who wish to use it to justify their pursuit of a moot point until the argument revolves around how factual or technically correct a comment is instead of the subject of the original thread and the spirit in which it was posted.

I accept that Life in the 1500's though not very accurate was a harmless amusement unless of course it is an affront to the historically correct among us. As far as history, there are many supposed 'facts' that have been debunked and many more that will be debunked which I hope does not cause too many historians to suffer anxiety or a loss of identity. As an example, there are entire religions based on the idea of faith rather than proven fact but you cannot persuade a devout believer that their faith is not based on facts - afterall there are countless historical records attesting to these 'facts' aren't there? Are these records erroneous and if so, just maybe there are many so called historical representations that are more the belief of a historian or special interest group than they are 'factual'.

There is a saying which although I won't hazard as to who it's author is and risk being corrected, that one should " Believe nothing that you hear, hallf of what you read, and all that you see." Of course the see part is difficult these days with computer enhancement. So as I wasn't around in the 1500's or any other historical period, I tend to take histroy with a grain of salt and it's real purpose IMO is to help us understand where we've been to better know where we are and where we wish to go and not repeat our mistakes - of course this hasn't been the case generally with mankind but will be with me in future postings.

I guess this moot point has now been suffiently flogged to death.
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Old 20-02-2007, 16:15   #262
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::grin::

Benny, it's okay... I'm hoping more people will chime in on this thread with events and maritime history discussions. I don't think anyone was trying to bite, even though that may have accidentally come across.

It's hard enough to get sailors to sit down and discuss anything, let alone a subject as contentious as history. (Try asking "Which is better, laid or braided line?" or "3-sided sails, or 4-sided sails?" sometime.)

On t'other hand, being somewhat anal-retentive myself, I really appreciate when people can correct my calendar events. A lot of my sources are a bit dodgy, to say the least, and I hate relying on single-sources.
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Old 20-02-2007, 16:46   #263
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Thank you Amgine - you're doing a splendid job relating all the maritime history - I enjoy it and have learned much. I apologize if I seemed to overreact with my comments - I acknowledge that many areas of thought and endevour require the fullest investigation before they can be relied upon for usefull information and instruction and particlurly where safety and well being are concerned. After that, it's all pretty much ones own preferences and opinions and I'm glad that I can enjoy a multitude of sailors and boaters on this forum whose views and opinions differ and can offer an alternate outlook that I might hot have considered.

Fair winds and keep up the good job.
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Old 20-02-2007, 21:58   #264
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21 February

  • 1907 - SS Berlin sinks off the Hoek van Holland. 128 lost, 15 survivors.
  • 1917 - RMS Mendi sinks off Isle of Wight after being struck by the liner Darrow with approximately 650 lost, 150 survivors.
  • 1945 - WWII: USS Bismarck Sea sunk off Iwo Jima by Japanese Kamikaze pilots.
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Old 21-02-2007, 06:47   #265
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First of all, apologies to Benny if I offended you. That was not my intention. I originally debated saying something directly to you, but decided quietly posting a couple of links offering some additional information was the best course of action.

You presented your original post as factual in an ongoing maritime history thread. You even encouraged readers to use these facts to educate someone. I understand most of the message was part of the email making the rounds. However, other than a reference to the hardships of living on a boat, I see nothing to indicate that you thought the bulk of the information was in jest.

I don't see a discussion about historic fact as being moot, especially in a maritime history thread. It is perfectly reasonable for other board members to publicly post alternate views to a posting. That is the point of a public message board. Every time I post a comment I expect polite and respectful response. I think you got just that in this case.

And yes, some people do take history seriously. I don't know what your passions are, or what you do for a living. However, I suspect someone blatantly criticizing and dismissing those endeavors would cause offense. I care about history and decided to supply several alternate views to your original message and let other board members decide for themselves.

Just so we can all be friends - I'll remind everyone that many people think owning a sailboat is stupid when much faster powerboats are available. I think we all have more in common on this board, than not.
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Old 21-02-2007, 07:41   #266
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I absolutely agree and my apology in my previous post was also meant for you and anyone else. I had just finished doing my income tax return and was not in a great mood and reacted unnecessarily to your post. Actually I am quite interested in history but not so much as a depiction of facts but more as a record of human progression ( or sometimes regression) and the overall effect of our journey through time. That is why Life in the 1500's was for me an interesting look at generalized history and how linguistically it applied today. I should have done some research first or qualified my post with a disclaimer.

And yes like you I have been on the receiving end of many comments regarding the value of sailing. Some of these people were fortunately converted when I took them for a sail and that to me is one of the things that like the sharing in this forum, reinforces the reason I enjoy sailing so much.
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Old 21-02-2007, 21:58   #267
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22 February

  • 1744 - The Battle of Cape Sicié begins (ends 23 February), when then-Admiral Thomas Mathews attacked an inferior French and Spanish fleet under Don Juan José Navarro and La Bruyère de Court, perhaps pre-emptive of the War of Austrian Succession.
  • 1784 - Empress of China sails from New York, NY, United States for China, first U.S. merchant to trade in China.
  • 1904 - The United Kingdom recognizes Argentina's claim to the South Orkney Islands, cedes control of Osmond House meteorological station (renamed by Argentina as Orcadas.) The UK reinstated their claim in 1908.
  • 1909 - The Great White Fleet returns to Virginia, United States.
  • 1979 - Saint Lucia gains independence from Britain.
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Old 23-02-2007, 20:41   #268
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23 February

  • 1792 - Humane Society of Massachusetts incorporated (erected life-saving stations for distressed mariners)
  • 1797 - The Last invasion of Britain occurred when a small French force landed at Carregwastad Head (or possibly Llanwnda), near Fishguard, Wales. The invading force found the local supply of whiskey and nearly instantly succumbed, with the surrender occurring on 25 February in the Royal Oak Pub in Fishguard.
  • 1852 - The iron-hulled troopship HMS Birkenhead strikes an uncharted rock en route to South Africa, sinks with an estimated 445 lost, 193 survivors. Origin of the phrase "Women and Children first!"
  • 1893 - Rudolf Diesel receives a patent for the diesel engine.
  • 1901 - SS City of Rio de Janeiro sinks in the Golden Gate en route to San Francisco, California, United States.
  • 1904 - For $10 million the United States leases the Panama Canal Zone for 99 years.
  • 1980 - Oil tanker Irene's Serenade spills ~100,000 tonnes (37 million gallons) of crude oil in Navarino Bay, Greece (fire and explosion)
  • 1980 - France performs nuclear test at Muruora Island.
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  • 1633 - Samuel Pepys, English naval administrator and man of letters, posthumously famous as a diarist (d. 1703)
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  • Brunei - National Day (1984 end of United Kingdom Protectorate.)
  • Guayana - Mashramani, Independence Day (1966 from the United Kingdom)
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Old 26-02-2007, 13:34   #269
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26 February

  • 1815 - Napoleon I of France departs Elba for 100-day reconquest of France.
  • 1907 - Royal Dutch Petroleum Company (N.V. Koninklijke Nederlandsche Petroleum Maatschappij) and Shell Transport and Trading Company Ltd of the United Kingdom merge to form Royal Dutch Shell PLC.
  • 1971 - Secretary-General U Thant signs United Nations proclamation of the vernal equinox as Earth Day.
  • 1991 - Tim Berners-Lee introduces WorldWideWeb, the first web browser.
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Old 27-03-2009, 22:12   #270
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Been a while...

28 March

  • 845 Paris was sacked by Viking raiders, probably under Ragnar Lodbrok, who collected a huge ransom in exchange for leaving.
  • 1910 - Henri Fabre becomes the first person to fly a seaplane, the Fabre Hydravion, after taking off from a water runway near Martigues, France.
  • 1941 - WWII: Battle of Cape Matapan - Decisive British naval victory over Italian forces in the Mediterranean.
  • 1942 - WWII: British naval forces raid the German-occupied French port of St. Nazaire.
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