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Old 25-02-2010, 13:36   #16
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A 'bulkhead' is the equivalent of a load bearing wall on a boat. A partial bulkhead would be the equivalent of a non-load-bearing wall. A skilled individual can (usually) completely gut the interior of a boat and rebuild it entirely, usually by using a combination of embedding wood pieces or strips to the inside hull with epoxy and/or attaching fiberglass 'tabs' to the inside hull. Throughbolting a bulkhead to the upper deck is an even stronger method of ensuring that the hull/deck/bulkhead attachment remains sound, even during the torquing of the hull in rough weather.
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Old 25-02-2010, 14:30   #17
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Someone might have brought this up already. Depending on what you plan on doing. day sailing around a bay with a few weekends = nice wide open cabin and area, lots of room for everyone to sit around.

Cruising in bad storms and off shore the = broken bones and being a pinball in your boat. Sometimes the "chopped up" look that gives you tons of hand holes and places to wedge yourself into is better.
So get out and sail and make sure you get out with some exp. people in some bad weather. that way you will get the feel of what its like to move around above and below with it pitching a bit.
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Old 25-02-2010, 15:27   #18
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.... being a pinball in your boat. Sometimes the "chopped up" look that gives you tons of hand holes and places to wedge yourself into is better.
A very graphic description, but I take your point. Thanks for the tip - it is a good one.
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Old 25-02-2010, 19:01   #19
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1) below 100 knots, most in the range of 0 - 20, vast majority of which 3-7 on a passage.

2) some don't, HR does not seem to need any internal work, does it, neither does Hoek.

b.
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Old 25-02-2010, 20:55   #20
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Regarding maintenance costs - it's surprising just how many systems an average cruising boat has, and in turn how many complex/expensive components are in those systems that require periodic repair or replacement. Maybe you could get a feel for this by looking at the equipment list of boats advertised on yachtworld.com, or by looking through the maintenance logs of a cruiser at a nearby marina. The average cruising boat has dozens and dozens of $1,000 plus components, and many need regular attention and periodic replacement. I have a well-maintained 20 year old boat, and there's always a list of projects on the horizon, and many of them have significant cost. I spend maybe 10% of my purchase price each year on boat projects, but I bet that number varies drastically for others.

Of course, if you've maintained a glider, this might sound familiar, and I hope comments like this won't dissuade you from pursuing a boat. Like many, I find the investment in time and money more rewarding than just about anything else. But in my opinion, it's better that your expectations are set correctly going in, or you'll be disappointed.
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Old 25-02-2010, 21:01   #21
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"Now the big difference is that down there on the wet blue stuff I cannot run out of height"

Sailors worry about depth. Same kinda thing, I think.
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Old 25-02-2010, 21:34   #22
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Quote:
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"Now the big difference is that down there on the wet blue stuff I cannot run out of height"

Sailors worry about depth. Same kinda thing, I think.
Yup... From now on you'll be flying on...........


Rocks, reefs and land are just to high to fly over...
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Old 25-02-2010, 21:59   #23
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Redesigning a interior of a sailboat is not that hard. Its not rocket science.
Of course you cant remove all interior bulkheads and leave it like that. The hull will then flex and lose strength. That doesn't mean you can't move something. Its just harder to do. But not even remotely impossible.

For instance, if your boat has 2 heads and you wanted to remove one of them, you could do it. You might have to move a bulkhead, which would mean exposing the hull on all sides. Not a impossible job. But there may be tanks in the way, or the mast, so carefull planning would have to be made. exposing the fiberglass hull, then grinding it a bit, putting in your bulkhead, then fiberglasssing it to the hull, then putting in the trim can be done. If you paid someone to do it, forgetabouit. But if you wanted to do it yourself, it could/would/is possible.
On older boats many times the tanks have to be replaced anyway. So if you got a older boat for a real good price, you could make it the way you wanted it and still be a head in cost over a more expensive boat. You just have to not count your labor costs and chalk it up to expirence.

On our endeavour 40, after the kids move on, I would like to replace the foreward head and Vberth area with a different arrangement. I can be done, and will not be prohibitivly expensive. But remember, you have to get it all thru the compainon way hatch, so everthing has to be made in pieces.

Look for older boats. They are cheaper. They need some work, but generally the fit and finish are nicer. The hull is thicker. The teak more likely old growth. And if you have the time, energy and knowledge, you can get a better boat.

As previously said, most boats in the 35-45 foot range or even bigger tend to make between 110-160 miles per day. A lot of people spend a lot of bucks to get bigger boats so they can go faster and farther, but in reality, it doesn't usually work out to all that much.
A cat might go faster clean, but load it up for crusing and it will not perform any better.
Just my 2 cents worth.
I once rode a glider. Was great, especially the ground effect ride at the end. Was a blast.
Used to jump out of airplanes in the army as well... but not the same at all!!... lol.
Good luck in your endeavours sir.
Bob
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Old 25-02-2010, 22:09   #24
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How important is balance (nobody wants a list).
How do you secure things to a GRP hull?

Regards

Brian
Balence is less important as boat size goes up, more important on smaller boats and cats.

You secure things to a grp hull by glassing it to the hull directly, or buy glassing in a piece of wood, that you then screw into. So if you wanted to tab a bulkhead into the hull, you would grind it to expose fiberglass, then "GLUE" the wood to the hull on either side with epoxy and fiberglass.
But if you wanted to put in say a ac unit, you could glass in wood to the hull, then screw into that.
Load bearing stuff is trickier. Like chain plates.
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Old 02-03-2010, 18:53   #25
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We have an Islander 36 which is fairly roomy for a 36' boat. We slept 5 adults on it for a weekend and it was extremely tight. It is great for taking 5 or 6 people out for the day or having 3 on it for a weekend or 2 on it for a week or a little more.

Unless you know for sure that your in-laws will really be into spending weekends with you on the boat don't let that drive your decision on which boat.
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Old 10-03-2010, 07:42   #26
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Ask a truthfull cruising yachtsman and he will tell you that the average speed of a cruising yacht is 4 knots. Unless you are trying for a sailing record your cruising eg: taking your time some times you will tear along in a good breeze another time you will stand still and admire the fiew and fish
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Old 10-03-2010, 07:57   #27
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i take it that the RYA course that you are doing is Competent Crew?,its a good place to start with but with your Navigation experience i would consider moving up to day skipper.The theory can be done on your laptop,i did it on mine.

the nav will be easy for you,the principles are very much the same,we have tidal set and drift when you are planning a course and from what i can work out on my mates flying charts,he does the same except it is windage etc.

On day skipper,it tends to be a quiz on questions and the instructor makes their mind up on weither you know your beans or not,to go on further you need day skipper theory and Practical then its coastal after that.

I did mine out in the canaries,it was march and i did not fancy the North Sea in winter.

Also find out if there is a sailing club close to you,its a great way to meet others and to learn about sailing
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Old 10-03-2010, 08:02   #28
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Ask a truthfull cruising yachtsman and he will tell you that the average speed of a cruising yacht is 4 knots.
That seems fair enough. Thanks for the info.
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Old 10-03-2010, 08:17   #29
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i take it that the RYA course that you are doing is Competent Crew?,its a good place to start with but with your Navigation experience i would consider moving up to day skipper.The theory can be done on your laptop,i did it on mine.
I'm not on any course just yet. I'm planning to get sorted over the next few years and then sod-off for a decade starting in April 2016. I've never sailed before but I have used small boats and outboards. I can already tie many "naval" knots and I know some of the terminology, but I've never before set foot on a sailboat.

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the nav will be easy for you,the principles are very much the same,we have tidal set and drift when you are planning a course and from what i can work out on my mates flying charts,he does the same except it is windage etc.
Yep. We have track-over-ground, heading and crabwise flight (a bit like leeway on a boat). Many of the gliding theory tests are taken on computer or online these days as well. It sounds very, very similar in many ways.

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On day skipper,it tends to be a quiz on questions and the instructor makes their mind up on weither you know your beans or not,to go on further you need day skipper theory and Practical then its coastal after that.
I plan to spend some time cruising around the UK in the summer and then head south to the Med or the Canaries for winter. I imagine that some form of skippering course would be immensely useful.

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I did mine out in the canaries,it was march and i did not fancy the North Sea in winter.



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Also find out if there is a sailing club close to you,its a great way to meet others and to learn about sailing
The closest seems to be in Conwy (North Wales), but I'll do it next year, not this year. The plan goes like this

  1. This year - research and find things out
  2. Next year - assess how the saving and earnings are going on the "buy a secondhand yacht" plan. Start courses
  3. 2013 - look at "crewing" to gain experience
  4. 2014 - continue getting experience. Reassess funding and start looking at boats
  5. 2015 - Purchase a boat. Transform into comfortable "home"
  6. 2016 - Off we go (the missus is coming as well, maybe the cat...)

So there is no rush to get it all done by next week.... Glider pilots are very, very careful people. We plan in advance.
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Old 10-03-2010, 08:43   #30
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i had worked on ships before and had a couple of weeks as crew but never really sailed,my wife had resisted my getting a boat as we had young children,so i came up with a plan,

1/ i went down to the local RYA lake and learned dinghy sailing
2/when out and bought a boat
3/took boat out and decided that i needed to learn more
4/got an experienced buddy to go out with me
5/Rya day skipper theory.day skipper practical and VHF course
6/do more sailing,now getting ready to sell small boat and move up a size or two
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