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Old 13-08-2015, 21:10   #16
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Re: Fuel feed pump issue OR not?

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Originally Posted by a64pilot View Post
Oil diluted with fuel isn't as good a lubricant of course, but a very real danger is if you get enough fuel in the oil, the engine will run away and the only way to stop it is to choke it off by blocking the air intake.
Thanks for the information. I've watched the videos on Youtube, in horror, about runaway diesels. Now where is that board?
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Old 13-08-2015, 21:11   #17
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Re: Fuel feed pump issue OR not?

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One issue with electric pumps is that when your battery dies, so does your engine. You can't even hand crank it to start. At least with an MD7 you can easily start it with the hand crank, even if the battery is toast. (Assuming you have a mechanical fuel pump)

DougR
I hadn't thought about that. Good point.
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Old 13-08-2015, 21:26   #18
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Re: Fuel feed pump issue OR not?

I have a similar problem with my yanmar lift pump but it works. I have a spare electric fuel pump ( you can get them cheap off Ebay) as Yanmar wants $360 NZ for the pump as they wont sell you a rebuild kit. The pumps are simple tho if you have some mechanical skills. I'm sticking with the mechanical pump until it fails as its been going for 35 years but I dont have the same faith that a chinese made electrical one will have the same longevity. Will rig a dual circuit to use the electric one as a priming pump as suggested in other posts.
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Old 17-08-2015, 19:31   #19
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Re: Fuel feed pump issue OR not?

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Thanks again for the help! This has been an adventure.

I have been reading my Volvo workshop manual and it mentioned making sure the fuel feed pump (aka lift pump) "squeaked" when you press the manual lever (the bleeding lever).

Mine does not squeak. At all.

Squeaking indicates that the diaphragm inside is in good working order.

First of all, I am going to ignore it (for now) and not rebuild/disassemble it.

What I want to know is has anyone recently rebuilt their MD7A fuel feed pump? The pump for the MD7A (and many of the older Volvos) is a Pierburg, model number 15672.

The reason I ask is because they don't make parts anymore for this model and I have been unable to locate a rebuild kit, or anything, for the fuel feed pump.

Looks like a dead copy for my Westerbeke 1983 6-cylinder. I have two spares and a new rebuild kit. Mine does not squeak either. I would not worry as long as it works. Get a spare or kit. These things are very simple to fix.
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Old 18-08-2015, 04:11   #20
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Re: Fuel feed pump issue OR not?

From information you have posted elsewhere on CF, you might be considering replacing your fuel tank; if so, consider a gravity feed tank and do away with a ful pump of any sort.

Last time I checked, gravity was a very dependable system , although you could carry an electric pump as a back up.
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Old 18-08-2015, 08:13   #21
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Re: Fuel feed pump issue OR not?

Gravity tanks - main or a day tank - are OK until you have a fuel system fire.

Granted, a pretty rare event, but if it happens and if you don't have a remote shut off or a shut off valve outside of the engine room then the entire contents of the fuel tank (one gallon up to +20 gallons) can feed the fire.

Not a good thing.....

If you have a large enough dry chemical extinguisher (at least 5-lb, 10-lb better yet) you can usually - note usually - get the fire out, but you will still have fuel freely flowing into the engine space.

Again, not a good thing.....so have a plan for immediately shutting off/plugging the fuel outlet. After you have shut off the batteries! You don't need damaged energized electrical wiring re-igniting the fuel with you inside the compartment trying to stop the leak!

A fire fighting "trick" that is very handy to know, eventhough it is sort of a "last chance" way of getting the fire out, is to pour water into the fuel tank via the deck fuel fill. Water is heavier than fuel, so sinks to the bottom of the tank - where the gravity fuel outlet is. After a few seconds you will have non-flammable water coming out of the leak instead of a flammable liquid.

Depending on the size of the hole and the shape of your fuel tank, a couple of gallons of water may be enough to do the trick, although you can pour in more to be safe.

You will still need to extinguish the burning fuel that has already leaked out, but at least gravity is not adding more fuel to the fire.
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Old 18-08-2015, 08:48   #22
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Re: Fuel feed pump issue OR not?

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Originally Posted by Wotname View Post
From information you have posted elsewhere on CF, you might be considering replacing your fuel tank; if so, consider a gravity feed tank and do away with a ful pump of any sort.

Last time I checked, gravity was a very dependable system , although you could carry an electric pump as a back up.
My diesel tank is as high as possible under the cockpit floor allowing space for fittings. Previously with a Ruggerini engine when it's mechanical fuel pump failed, as long as the tank was over about half full it would gravity feed with no problems.

That pump failed because the rocker arm pivot developed wear greater than the travel of its actuating pushrod.

Some speedway cars used a hand operated air pump to pressurise the fuel tank instead of a mechanical pump. I have on occasion blown down the vent hose exiting near the tiller to initiate priming ( not specially recommended ). It should be possible in an emergency to adapt the dinghy inflating pump to keep the diesel tank pressurised as long as the filler cap has an O ring seal.

Model T Fords and I think Model A had a gravity feed tank in front of the dashboard and windshield, above the engine. When their fuel level dropped they had to reverse up steep hills to keep the fuel level above the carb. So I was told.
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Old 18-08-2015, 09:14   #23
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Re: Fuel feed pump issue OR not?

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Originally Posted by Wotname View Post
From information you have posted elsewhere on CF, you might be considering replacing your fuel tank; if so, consider a gravity feed tank and do away with a ful pump of any sort.

Last time I checked, gravity was a very dependable system , although you could carry an electric pump as a back up.
My fuel tank is as high as possible under the cockpit floor allowing space for fittings. With my previous Ruggerini engine, when the fuel pump failed it would gravity feed with no problems as long as the tank was over about half full

That pump failed because it's rocker pivot developed wear greater than the travel of its actuating push rod.

Some speedway cars used a hand air pump to pressurise the fuel tank instead of a mechanical pump. I have on occasions blown down the diesel air vent hose exiting near the tiller to initiate priming. It should be possible in an emergency to pressurise the tank adapting the dinghy pump or a bike pump.

Model T Fords and I think Model A had a gravity feed gas tank above the engine in front of the dashboard. If the fuel level was low they had to reverse up steep hills to keep the fuel level above the carb. So I was told.
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Old 22-08-2015, 09:13   #24
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Re: Fuel feed pump issue OR not?

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Again, not a good thing.....so have a plan for immediately shutting off/plugging the fuel outlet. After you have shut off the batteries! You don't need damaged energized electrical wiring re-igniting the fuel with you inside the compartment trying to stop the leak!

A fire fighting "trick" that is very handy to know, eventhough it is sort of a "last chance" way of getting the fire out, is to pour water into the fuel tank via the deck fuel fill. Water is heavier than fuel, so sinks to the bottom of the tank - where the gravity fuel outlet is. After a few seconds you will have non-flammable water coming out of the leak instead of a flammable liquid.

Depending on the size of the hole and the shape of your fuel tank, a couple of gallons of water may be enough to do the trick, although you can pour in more to be safe.

You will still need to extinguish the burning fuel that has already leaked out, but at least gravity is not adding more fuel to the fire.
Good ideas. Thanks! The tank will be mounted above the engine with a shutoff valve just outside the tank.

Nigel Calder, in one of his books has noted, that you can limp home using gravity to deliver fuel to the engine by bypassing the the fuel pump. I just redid the fuel lines so I know what to do and where to splice in.

Thanks for the info on the fires. Interesting trick. I like fire, but I don't like fire on me or my boat.
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Old 22-08-2015, 09:16   #25
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Re: Fuel feed pump issue OR not?

Thanks to your advice I have abandoned my fears about my non-squeeking fuel pump.
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