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Old 03-01-2016, 22:15   #901
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Re: The criteria of "blue"

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Originally Posted by nortonscove View Post
A dugout canoe wouldn't have the required handhold for most of the experts on these forums. It would however meet the needs of the most daring. I don't profess to be either but prefer to respect those that have the sea legs to forego the need for all those handholds. Have yet to find one on our 53 year old tugboat.
Hmm... I bet the motion of your tug is a bit more stately than a small yacht when in a seaway. Different kind of accelerations entirely!

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Old 04-01-2016, 00:47   #902
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Re: The criteria of "blue"

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Originally Posted by nortonscove View Post
A dugout canoe wouldn't have the required handhold for most of the experts on these forums. It would however meet the needs of the most daring. I don't profess to be either but prefer to respect those that have the sea legs to forego the need for all those handholds. Have yet to find one on our 53 year old tugboat.
You need more than sea legs to defy gravity at 45 Degrees. Mr gravity is quite nasty at lesser tilt as well. Got spikes in your welly's? They will ruin your deck you know.. Hand holds, even old salty ropey ones are much less damaging.
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Old 04-01-2016, 09:55   #903
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Re: The criteria of "blue"

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.....Jim and Ann
s/v Insatiable II lying Barnes Bay, Bruny island, with a busted main traveller. Rats!
Hope you're enjoying your stay in Tassie! During your forced idleness, I wonder what guidance you might offer those of us currently seeking a 35-40ft vessel suited to SW Pacific cruising - wood composite compared to figlass, things that break in out-of-the-way places, the tradeoff between motion comfort/safety and speed... any other advice to prospective purchasers?
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Old 04-01-2016, 10:06   #904
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Re: The criteria of "blue"

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Originally Posted by nortonscove View Post
A dugout canoe wouldn't have the required handhold for most of the experts on these forums. It would however meet the needs of the most daring. I don't profess to be either but prefer to respect those that have the sea legs to forego the need for all those handholds. Have yet to find one on our 53 year old tugboat.
In a dugout you need your hands to keep the paddle moving thus no need for handholds..
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Old 04-01-2016, 13:41   #905
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Re: The criteria of "blue"

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Hope you're enjoying your stay in Tassie! During your forced idleness, I wonder what guidance you might offer those of us currently seeking a 35-40ft vessel suited to SW Pacific cruising - wood composite compared to figlass, things that break in out-of-the-way places, the tradeoff between motion comfort/safety and speed... any other advice to prospective purchasers?
G'Day, ND,

Of course we're enjoying Tassie! Replacement parts ordered, delivery today (?? depending upon the diligence of the couriers) plenty to keep us occupied. Now anchored in Little Oyster Cove (off Kettering) where the chandlery is, the sun is s hining and the water is all still in liquid state. Life could be one hell of a lot worse!

Advice? That' a big ask, but to touch on a couple of the points you raised:

When we set out looking for a different boat (our old IOR one-tonner didn't have accommodations for kids and grandkids to visit) I wasn't thinking of timber composite at all. But after three years of searching, when this boat came to my attention, it ticked 20 out of 21 specific criteria that we'd established, so we swooped on it... and in t he nearly 13 years we've owned her, I've become a real fan of the construction. Extremely strong, pretty light, attractive aesthetically, fairly easy to repair, no osmosis or corrosion issues, and a great way to build a one-off design. While I prefer strip planked, cold moulded (called triple skin some places) is also very good. Depends somewhat on what timbers are available to the builder... I'd do it again in a heartbeat!

Out of the way breakage? Yep, gonna happen if you do enough miles and years of cruising. Take spares (never the right ones), keep critical things simple and strong, be ready to improvise if required, and so on. Maintenance helps avoid these issues, but things still creep in below your radar. This recent traveller failure was an axle bolt in one of the sheaves in the traveller car... crevice corrosion inside the sheave area where inspection is difficult. Who'da thought?
We could have continued on sans traveller if repair was not do-able but cchose to fix it now.

Speed vs comfort? A very personal choice, and a pretty subjective one. We have chosen a somewhat high performance design, and are willing to take the motion that she provides... which is not so bad to our tastes. YMMV.

So that's enough idle thinking, but I'm happy to answer more specific questions if they arise.

Jim
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Old 04-01-2016, 15:48   #906
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Re: The criteria of "blue"

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In a dugout you need your hands to keep the paddle moving thus no need for handholds..
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Old 05-01-2016, 14:13   #907
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Re: The criteria of "blue"

All this about handholds and such reminds me of the Prom deck shopping area in the old RMS Queen Mary. It had a cork-based floor and, in rough seas, some of the women passengers would dig in their high heels.

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Old 05-01-2016, 15:36   #908
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Re: The criteria of "blue"

And with balsa cored decks everywhere, all we need is a pair of crampons!
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Old 06-01-2016, 06:05   #909
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Re: The criteria of "blue"

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1) It floats.

2) It sails.

3) Big enough to carry you plus food and water for as long as you plan to but out at sea.

Objectively? That is all you need.

Everything else is subjective.

...
I would add to that a minimum seaworthiness and stability (RCD class A is a good reference as a minimum) and equipped for it, namely in what regards production of electric energy, sails for a storm and a lines and points to link a harness.
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Old 06-01-2016, 21:56   #910
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Re: The criteria of "blue"

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All this about handholds and such reminds me of the Prom deck shopping area in the old RMS Queen Mary. It had a cork-based floor and, in rough seas, some of the women passengers would dig in their high heels.

Sent from my XT1254 using Cruisers Sailing Forum mobile app

Women do seem to be a bit cat like. Yet they like water.. strange.
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