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Old 10-05-2008, 17:48   #1
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self tacking jib

considering self tacking jib on next boat, or less likely re-rigging my current boat with a self tacking jib, for a couple of reasons.

anyone have any feedback from experience sailing with self tacking jib?

thanks
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Old 11-05-2008, 04:16   #2
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self taking jib are the best think since sliced bread if the boat was designed for it (fractional rig) they tend to make the head sail to small on mast head rigs, I raced a ross 930 with a self tacker, tacking dules were always amusing
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Old 11-05-2008, 04:36   #3
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Have had two boats with self tacking staysails. The first was a club footed version and the second is on a roller furling with a traveler and a single sheet. Both boats were true cutters. They work best when it gets too wild as they are small sails. With a reefed main you can just steer the boat and not have to fool around with so many lines. How big is the sail?
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Old 11-05-2008, 05:26   #4
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I have a Hanse 371. Hanse (HanseYachts AG - Greifswald ) is the only builder with the self tacking Jib as standard on its complet range. ( from 32 to 63 foot )
The only drawback with this Jib is that it loses much of its drive as soon as you ease the sheet a few inches : the leech twist opens and only the bottom of the sail provides any drive. Upwind however and expecialy with lots of wind a short footed headsail is much more efficient than a genoa that's been reefed around a foil.
For light winds ( < 4 Bft ) I complement my set-up with a Asymmetrical gennaker

Koen
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Old 11-05-2008, 05:39   #5
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Dan Neri (North Sails) on Self-Tacking Jibs:
“The trade-off with a self-tacking headsail is [reduced] sail area, for ease of sailing to windward ...”
Goto: What Cruising Sailors Need to Know
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Old 11-05-2008, 06:28   #6
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Sorry if I am asking a stupid question, but how do you make a staysail self tacking?
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Old 11-05-2008, 10:58   #7
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you know i've never actually been certain of my current sailplan as the boat documentation quotes a main sail area of 18.1 sq m (194 sq ft) and a foretriangle area of 22.3 sq m (240 sq ft) but in other sources i've seen the total sail area quoted at 305 sq ft (which actually seems more believable for a 32 ft LOA boat). either way, its masthead rigged and has a relativeley smaller mainsail, so i'm guessing prob would not do well with a self tacking blade jib, although for some inexplicable reason i still kinda want to do it.

i have been looking at the Hanse 370 a lot and quite like it. have never sailed in one but have been on a few at the dock and in boat shows. i take your points regarding appropriate trimming. i have read what i could find on design of these and most suggest they are a great idea but the jib traveller should span the entire deck, which neither the Hanse nor Tartan does. does this result in the sensitivity you describe, or is it unrelated? overall sounds like you have had a very positive experience, though.
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Old 12-05-2008, 11:08   #8
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Sorry if I am asking a stupid question, but how do you make a staysail self tacking?
Typically, they are boomed like mine. My boat started as a yawl with a Frac rigged Jib but a bowsprit was added, along with a boom, and the stock Jib became the self tacking Staysail. A new furler was installed with a 150 Genoa on it forward of the old Forstay as a Masthead unit. The original Forestay was replaced with a detachable Solent stay for the Staysail to hank onto to. I'm getting a Yankee built so I can fly dual headsails in moderate wind, since my 150 Norlam Genny is only rated to 22 knots apparent. It's a nice setup and doesn't suffer from weather helm, even with the Mizzen Staysail and Mizzen up.
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Old 14-05-2008, 02:56   #9
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Thanks CharlieCobra, I get it now.
Reason I asked was that I will have a cutter rig with a 130 genoa, and can see the advantages of a self tacking staysail.

Cheers,
Andreas
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Old 14-05-2008, 04:07   #10
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Club-Footed (boomed) fore-sails are often called "deck sweepers", for very good reason.
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Old 14-05-2008, 05:59   #11
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With a high aspect sail the lead position needs to be aggressively moved (out and forward) when you crack. If you have a rail track, add a barber and retrim. No need to remove the sheets from the sail. Your new lead position is far enough forward to keep the luff breaking evenly. Unless of course you want to depower.

Quote:
Originally Posted by scarab View Post
I have a Hanse 371. Hanse (HanseYachts AG - Greifswald ) is the only builder with the self tacking Jib as standard on its complet range. ( from 32 to 63 foot )
The only drawback with this Jib is that it loses much of its drive as soon as you ease the sheet a few inches : the leech twist opens and only the bottom of the sail provides any drive. Upwind however and expecialy with lots of wind a short footed headsail is much more efficient than a genoa that's been reefed around a foil.
For light winds ( < 4 Bft ) I complement my set-up with a Asymmetrical gennaker

Koen
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Old 14-05-2008, 06:01   #12
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Club-Footed (boomed) fore-sails are often called "deck sweepers", for very good reason.
Agreed. Not a big fan of club foots. There are many other more creative ways to hurt myself aboard Joli.
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Old 14-05-2008, 07:48   #13
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Saw something very interesting a few weeks ago. At present we're knocking around in the California Delta before heading to mexico,
And up her in Stockton where the channel gets narrow (100 yrds) is the Stockton Sailing club. Many of the boats are rigged for self-tacking for the racing that is done up here. The jib, without a pole, is conected (by car)to a track. the track is mounted at the mast base (forward side). but is arched forward and upward on each end. It follows the arch of the sail as it swings fron side to side. Designed much like a traveler on a mainsheet.
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Old 15-05-2008, 07:30   #14
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Have you checked out a Tartan 3400 or 3700 CCR? These have the requirements you are seeking.
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