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Old 04-06-2006, 07:54   #1
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It's Not A 'Cheoy Lee'

When the phrase "It's a Cheoy Lee" is used it isn't correct. "A Cheoy Lee" implies the boat was designed by someone named Cheoy Lee just like an 'Atkins' or 'Colin Archer' or whomever. Mr. Cheoy Lee only built boats following plans drawn by someone else like Arthur Robb for example.
So there are no "Cheoy Lees".
Not to be too 'anal'.
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Old 04-06-2006, 10:35   #2
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Not to be anal But what about Catalina, Ericson, Clipper Marine, Pacific Seacraft, Columbia.....and the list goes on. Are these the names of the designers?
.................._/)
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Old 04-06-2006, 11:01   #3
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I've learned not to demand across the board consistency and logic in all areas of life. The world isn't going to change to conform to my "corrected" mapping of it. When younger, I sometimes would demand this consistency, but I was quickly becomming a frustrated Don Quixote, tilting at windmills, thinking they were giants. Oh, and they never died when I spent myself upon them. They just creaked away like they did before I ever got there to put things right.

For me, it's better to accept many things as illogical, or absurd, or whatever funky thing they want to be, and respond with a shruggging of the shoulders (which is a useful gesture that lets things slide off my back quite easily).

Besides, when I was young and anal retentive, I was much less fun to be around. Nobody loves the correct names for things more than I. But constantly setting things right is a great way to become rigid in thought and demanding of others' linguistic performance. Believe me, I could spend all day on this site, just correcting spelling (drives me nuts!), but I'm not going to change the world, so I've learned to relax and take things the way they come. Better for my blood pressure. And less aggravation for everyone else.

P.S.— the use of single quotation marks where double quotation marks are called for isn't correct. The singles are used for "a quote 'within' a quote," to help keep two speakers separated in the reader's mind. An example would be: "Then Curly shouted 'You'll never take me alive, Sheriff,' and started fanning his six-shooter," Kevin reported, after exiting the afternoon matinee.

Oh, and quotation marks usually are placed outside other punctuation.

Not to be too "anal."

Whoops, there I go! <lol>
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Old 05-06-2006, 02:42   #4
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I think designating a boat by it's designer, or by it's manufacturer, is a matter of context.

Established in the 1800's, Cheoy Lee built over 4500 yachts, designed* by some of the worlds best known Naval Architects (Bill Luders, Taylor Newell, John Alden, Maury DeClerck, Dave Pedrick, Philip Rhodes, Robert Perry, Ray Richards, Arthur Robb, Tord Sunden, Sparkman & Stephens, Laurent Giles, & Charles Wittholz) from the 1950's through the 80's. They still build Power boats.
Whether it’s designed* by Luders, Pedrick or S&S, it’s still a Cheoy Lee.

*Given the liberties that Cheoy Lee took with the original designs (particularly in materials selection), some N/A’s prefer not to have their name associated with Cheoy Lee.
Cheoy Lee made a knock-off from the Philip L. Rhodes “Reliant” design, marketed as the Offshore 40 (41?), and refused to pay design royalties to Rhodes. Rhodes considered suing, but finally decided that the lawyers would end up with the money, not him.
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Old 05-06-2006, 06:58   #5
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Thanx for the 'advice'.
I wasn't being that serious just finding out whos here. LOL
I like using single quotes. They look kinda 'cool'.
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Old 05-06-2006, 22:25   #6
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In the 60's the yard was owned by the Lo family, who used to send their boys to prep schools in Massachusetts. They all turned our fine. The boast were from many different designers, and i remember the Rhodes Reliant as they were not shy about using the name.

My dad was a dealer in New England back then, i was the kid sidekick; the boats would come off the ships in Boston all streaked green from these green shipping tarps. I'd painstakingly clean them, and scrape, sand, and cuprinol the teak decks til they gleamed. Hard work but good money for a teenager, and then I'd take the new owners on a shakedown sail.

Some of the standing rigging shackles, made in the yard's foundry, were truly dubious, we joked they were make of potassium. Once replaced with real stainless for just a few bucks, they were fine.

Yeah, the copied designs. The B-30 was a takeoff on the H-28, the Frisco Flyer was a smooth-seam Folkboat, and I guess they never asked Phil Rhodes about the Reliant. The Lion I think was a North-Sea design, and I liked the Robb-35.

I remember these boats, and those times, fondly.
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Old 06-06-2006, 06:30   #7
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I'm pretty sure the 'Lion' class was also designed by Arthur Robb.
I have one.
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Old 06-06-2006, 13:07   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilly
I'm pretty sure the 'Lion' class was also designed by Arthur Robb.
I have one.
No doubt you're right, I'm just using my vague memory here. I remember the Lion as narrower and deeper than the Robb-35, more like a sloop or cutter-type hull design you might see around the North Sea.

Sometimes I'd get to deliver these boats around New England. The Newell Cadet and the B-30 weren't very fast, but the Lion and the Robb-35 moved right along.

Good sailing to you in your Lion.
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Old 28-06-2006, 02:52   #9
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Cheoy Lee is the name of famous boatyard that used to be located at Penny's Bay on Hong Kong's Lantau Island. Several years ago, the yard was moved to mainland China (near Shanghai I believe) to tap into the cheaper labor market there.

As for Penny's Bay, it is also gone - along with the indigineous (and rare) pink dolphins that used to romp there. In its place? Disneyland.

But, be sure always to call it 'progress'.
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