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Old 10-08-2008, 13:19   #16
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Blue water "safe"?
I would not rate anything less than a large cruise ship as blue water "safe".

Do the words TITANIC, ANDREA DORIA , bring anything to mind...

Any boat is bluewater capable, depends on the skipper

Any boat will last 20+ years, just as one won't last 5 years depending on the skipper
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Old 10-08-2008, 15:54   #17
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It is the sailor, not the vessel that makes for safe offshore cruising. Personally, I would be more than happy to take a Bene49 offshore, but would be mindful of her limitations when planning the trip (as I would be with any vessel).
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Old 10-08-2008, 16:39   #18
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I have been following "Our Life at Sea" from a posting on this web site. A great story and due to the fact that they are sailing a Beneteau a review of their web site may help in your research. Good Luck.
Our Life At Sea - Our Boat
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Old 10-08-2008, 17:24   #19
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Originally Posted by Boracay View Post
I would not rate anything less than a large cruise ship as blue water "safe".

After making sure that the boat is as good as good can be safety comes from experience, training and caution.

Do I recall a 'cruise ' ship beginning with a T?
That said, good points!

EDIT...
Apologies ~ I should have read whole thread.
Great comment by Fatty!
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Old 10-08-2008, 17:42   #20
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I totally agree with the idea that any boat can be blue water qualified as it depends on the skipper and crew. Just remembering that islanders paddled their way across the pacific on basic canoes and the like, I can't feel any safer with today's boats. The technology put into today's yachts should put enough confidence in most people to take on any challenge, within your skill set of course.

I was also looking at the bene's as now we are seriously looking at the Jeanneaus. I believe that they are made as well if not even better then bene's. Even though they are owned by the same parent company. But, I do like both boats for different reasons.

I think the main reason for choosing that company is because of their extensive worldwide network and reach. It gives me better confidence in knowing that there should be a dealer nearby for service if needed.

Just my 2 cents...
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Old 10-08-2008, 22:03   #21
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Originally Posted by svHyLyte View Post

After re-reading your post earlier this morning, my (far) better half and I pulled up the Beneteau web-site and looked at the boat again and her first comment was "...the cabin's beautiful but there's nothing to hold on to". (At only 4'-11", tho' she claims 5', hand holds are a big issue for her.) She also read my earlier post and commented that the fuel and water capacity of the yacht is better, and the same, respectively, as ours and they've not been a problem for us and a water-maker can remedy the water supply situation anyway--so I stand corrected.

As for strength and endurance, your primary issues--the yacht is more than adaquate in my view--eh Fatty?--and, shaped much like a classic west coast "sled", she'll have a good turn of speed off the wind which is what you require.

Cheers,

s/v HyLyte

I had totally over looked the handrails. She does have a very big cabin, which is one of the things i really liked. Im 6'1" almost 6'2" so this was one of the few boats that I didn't feel cluster phobic in. If you look at the webstite. there are pictures of the 46 that show handrails on the ceiling. I assume the 49 had the same rails, although it doesn't look like they go all the way through the cabin. I'll have to go talk to the rep this week and check the boat out again as far as this issue.
So im going to take it as the water and fuel capacity is adequate. For a 3 week trip.. although it seems like I would like a little more fuel capacity.
Fuel Capacity : 63 gal.
Water Capacity : 150 gal.
Im still a little unsure of the function of the diagonal berth in the back, but maybe its long enough to just sleep on it diagonally so to be sleeping inline with the hull. I test it out this week and give you guys an update

Thanks for all the responses so far. I really enjoy reading everyone’s feedback.
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Old 10-08-2008, 22:33   #22
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Originally Posted by Santana View Post

Any boat is bluewater capable, depends on the skipper
And don't forget - Anything that floats can be made to sink - LOL...

The more I talk and hear about Beneteaus the more I think they suffer from "variety." That is under one brand name they make smaller boats, lighter boats, more "racer" oriented cruisers and more "cruiser" oriented racers.

It seems unfair to put all beneteaus in the same basket as they all seem to be different.

They are well supported simply because of volume.
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Old 11-08-2008, 08:03   #23
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Firstly, all boats are not bluewater capable.

If I took our 47.7 to the middle of the atlantic, closed it up, and left it floating, I would put money on the fact that it would still be fine many months later - with no skipper.

The only caveat to the Bluewater capabilities of a Beneteau is that they don't come fitted out for Bluewater cruising. Why should they? 99% of their customers use them for coastal cruising, so who wants to pay for bluewater equipment?

But, nevertheless, they are strong and well built.
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Old 11-08-2008, 12:00   #24
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As far as converting a boat to blue water... Are there allot of surprise expenses?
What are the biggest expenses that people are running into?

Would the flooring need to be redone to put latches on all the flooring boards to prevent them from coming loose in bad seas?
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Old 11-08-2008, 16:05   #25
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As far as converting a boat to blue water... Are there allot of surprise expenses?
What are the biggest expenses that people are running into?

Would the flooring need to be redone to put latches on all the flooring boards to prevent them from coming loose in bad seas?
Think, worse case, about your boat doing a 360 degree roll-over (it does happen). Anything that is not fastened down is going to be thrown around like it was in a giant washing machine. So yes, you do need a way of making sure your floorboards can't come loose. Ditto engine box, bunk tops, cupboards, fridge, etc.
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Old 11-08-2008, 16:10   #26
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And there are things like a watermaker, bimini, dodger, series drogue, etc. Also, some of the fittings etc. might need to be upgraded just for the reason that they will be used more often. I hate how you have to hold the button in to empty the shower sumps. Can't they put a toggle there? Then there is a generator, maybe solar panels, storm sails, etc.
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Old 11-08-2008, 16:48   #27
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I've been told that Beneteaus put all their plumbing and electrical in , then drop a fibreglass liner in , making it impossible to access any of it without having to cut holes in the liner. I've also heard they weren't allowed to get away with that in boats built for the charter iindustry. Any truth in that?
I've also been told by people who crew bennys that they have absolutely no directional stability, and it's impossible to leave the helm long enough to take a leak, without them rounding up, or broaching.
I've also heard that they lose all stability at angles of heel below 130 degrees, and become stable upside down, something that was unheard of in older designs.
Read Marchag's book" Seaworthiness, the Forgotten Factor."
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Old 11-08-2008, 18:18   #28
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I've been told that Beneteaus put all their plumbing and electrical in , then drop a fibreglass liner in , making it impossible to access any of it without having to cut holes in the liner.
Essentially wrong, although wiring and plumbing do run through chases and can be a pain in the neck to deal with.

Quote:
I've also been told by people who crew bennys that they have absolutely no directional stability, and it's impossible to leave the helm long enough to take a leak, without them rounding up, or broaching.
I cannot speak for boats later than the 1980's era First 42's but on that boat, if the yacht's sails are properly balanced and the helm locked off, the yacht will self steer unless there are big sea's that pump up the yawing moments. Later models with higher aspect ratio keels and higher prismatic coefficients may be more problematic.

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I've also heard that they lose all stability at angles of heel below 130 degrees, and become stable upside down, something that was unheard of in older designs.
I believe you mean greater that 130*? Semantics aside,Tony Marchaj's derivations of dynamic stability are undisputable and the implications frequently overlooked, or simply ignored, by the designers of all but a few "modern" boats on the market today. Never-the-less, I would be reluctant to issue such a definative blanket indictment of any particular yacht design absent rather more computational analysis than a social discourse merits, especially so given that the design characteristics in question are common across rather a wide spectrum of modern builds. With Marchaj's principal point, that the IOR and, later, IMS, gave rise to less than spectacular seaworthyness, I could not agree more, but will we ever see a return of CCA type boats? Unfortunately, not very likely. But then, as consolation, most of the latest crop of "appearance" yachts will remain harbor queens anyway.

FWIW...

s/v HyLyte
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Old 11-08-2008, 18:26   #29
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Originally Posted by Louis Riel View Post
I've been told that Beneteaus put all their plumbing and electrical in , then drop a fibreglass liner in , making it impossible to access any of it without having to cut holes in the liner. I've also heard they weren't allowed to get away with that in boats built for the charter iindustry. Any truth in that? Your source failed to inform you that there are wireways throughout the boat and all electrical is accessible. The plumbing is also accessible by the removal of panels.
I've also been told by people who crew bennys that they have absolutely no directional stability, and it's impossible to leave the helm long enough to take a leak, without them rounding up, or broaching. When the sails are properly trimmed, the boat will maintain a course with no input from the helm. When the boat rounds-up it is a sign that the wind is in control of the boat and not the helmsman. It is a poor sailor that does not know when his sails need to be adjusted or reefed.
I've also heard that they lose all stability at angles of heel below 130 degrees, and become stable upside down, something that was unheard of in older designs. According to US Sailing's "Capsize Screening Calculator", the Beneteau 49 is predicted to be stable. I doubt the large bulb on the end of the keel will allow the boat to remain upside down for long.
Read Marchag's book" Seaworthiness, the Forgotten Factor."
Beneteaus and all other "production boats" seem to take a beating from the members of this board on a regular basis. For my money, I would rather put my trust in a highly engineered and tested boat and systems than one that is not, as is generally the case with most smaller builders.
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Old 11-08-2008, 18:37   #30
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Yes, and thank goodness for that liner, it's what makes the boat so strong. It is possible to access all of it. It's actaully rather simple, all the connections are accessible making it just a matter of fishing the hose, wires,cables...just ask the moorings people who maintain the boats (yes the charter bene's are designed the same, just some different options that can better accomodate the charter crowd. Also, if you're running, for example, additional/battery cables, etc. just drill through the grid stingers...not a problem. They have great directional ability in all seaways and angles (mine does), it's a matter of sail trim...just keep the boat balanced and trimmed. I gues same principal applies to all sailboats. Also...even at 180 degrees appearant wind of 40 plus knots the boat will surf and track where you point it..just keep the bow pointed downwind....or you will round up, but then again what boat wouldn't at 40 knts appearant with full main ( I just had enough time to roll in the genoa...I actually heard the gust coming before it hit us, 47 knts were recorded by another boat...It never occured to me to look at the wind speed at the time). With regards to the heeling angles and being stable upside down....not sure about that...just because some said it or wrote about it does not prove anything, show me some evidence please...did some one actually create the circumstances and actually control the testing paramaters and provided results that were believable...this I must see. In tough stuff 'batten keep water out of the boat...'battendown the hatches' and companion way and keep your serated knife handy to cut away any sheets or haliards that are holding the sails. I do remember a race ( 1998 sydney to hobart) where certain race boats capsized and sailors died, but if i remember correctly, the six or so beneteaus in that race survived with crew intact and a few actually finished.
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