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Old 16-05-2007, 16:40   #1
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A boat in the backyard

I need to do a lot of work on my new to me Sceptre 41. I want to rewire, replumb, rerig, and make some changes to the cabin. Closet place that I can moore s/v Ohana is a two hour drive. I'm thinking of trucking her to my home (I have 8 acres) and building some type of cradle and doing all the work while she is in my backyard. The cost of trucking won't be cheap but sailing her down to SF from Canada and mooring her for a year won't be cheap either. Positives -- Wife is Ok with having the boat on the property. Tools are all here. the four hours in travel time can be used to work on the boat. Negatives -- Live far away from a chandelery, might interfere with my other(paying) work. Can't sail it while I work on it. Can you guys come up with some more positives and negatives to put on the list?
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Old 16-05-2007, 17:36   #2
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If you buy most of your supplies on the internet you don't need a chandlery close by. Or if you wait untill you need a bunch of items one run to a chandlery will do it.

That 4 hour return travel time will really cut down on your work time. You may find that you just wont bother to go and let things slide.

If the boat is close you will get in more work in your free time, even short periods.

Well, you already know these things, right...
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Old 16-05-2007, 18:00   #3
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Thanks Phil:

Just trying to weigh it out in my mind.
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Old 16-05-2007, 18:02   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie
I need to do a lot of work on my new to me Sceptre 41. I want to rewire, replumb, rerig, and make some changes to the cabin. Closet place that I can moore s/v Ohana is a two hour drive. I'm thinking of trucking her to my home (I have 8 acres) and building some type of cradle and doing all the work while she is in my backyard. The cost of trucking won't be cheap but sailing her down to SF from Canada and mooring her for a year won't be cheap either. Positives -- Wife is Ok with having the boat on the property. Tools are all here. the four hours in travel time can be used to work on the boat. Negatives -- Live far away from a chandelery, might interfere with my other(paying) work. Can't sail it while I work on it. Can you guys come up with some more positives and negatives to put on the list?
Yo Charlie,

free rent on your property and easy access for projects seems too good to pass up, but against the huge expense of the move, you should consider some other not-so-obvious issues.

A new boat takes awhile to "sink in". You need to take her out sailing so she can tell you what she wants you to do for her. Take awhile to get to know her. Don't just start ripping and tearing right away.

When you do start doing projects on her, take your time--some of the work can be taken home, or prepared for while not on the boat. And you might enjoy having a place to go stay in SF for a few days once in a while.

Leave her in the water, and sail her. Do a project now and then. Enjoy her.

best, andy
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Old 16-05-2007, 18:06   #5
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Doing it in the backyard is going to be much easier than on the water. Power for tools, being a constant level, (Your spirit levels will actually work properly on land) etc are pluses. But it's just being able to walk out, and pick up where you left off without having to set up everything that is the big thing.
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Old 16-05-2007, 20:01   #6
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Andy:

Thanks for the advice. I guess one more thing that I should have included in my post is that I am trying to get the boat ready for an October 2008 departure for Mexico. I wish I had more time use the boat and get to know her as you say. Sceptre's (like Freya's) were finished in many different manners, some by the shop some by the owners and some were redone in a way that doesn't make sense to me (that's my boat). I have to check all the wiring b/c of some of the things that I have found so far lead me to believe that there maybe unsafe wiring on the boat.

BTW My Aunt had a Freya 39. Lovely boat. It is a Northern California cult boat among cruisers. It made the short list of boats to buy.

CC:

You've got a point there. Mpt tpmention that access to my shop will make a big difference.
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Between us there was, as I have already said somewhere, the bond of the sea. Besides holding our hearts together through long periods of separation, it had the effect of making us tolerant of each other's yarns -- and even convictions. Heart of Darkness
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Old 16-05-2007, 20:52   #7
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Charlie, bring it home! The luxury of having your shop, your tools, your KITCHEN AND SHOWER AND BED <G> all convenient to the boat. You've got a lot of boat to work on, and if you consider the cost of yard fees and gasoline and throw in your four hour road trips versus even minimum wage...Eight acres is a nice way to work on your boat. Seven or eight jack stands (used, who cares) on nice sturdy bases will work as well as a cradle. Then you'll have less temptation to rush jobs because "I've got to drive home now".

As others point out, the internet makes a wonderful chandlery. And it solves the problem of "Oh, you wanted a 5/16" hose barb? We've only got metric..." <G> Sure, you'll have to plan ahead a little but with the luxury of having the boat at home, you can start to strip things down, make up the list of "stuff I need", and put in an order every two weeks (or week) as needed.

Unsafe wiring? Common when the PO "improved" things.<G> But before you rip anything out--spend some leisure time puzzling over it. Sometimes it isn't obvious how or why things were done, and if you're not fixing things that are outright broke--then yes, I'd agree you might want to sail for a season, and only after that make the changes. (Especially on "furniture" or fittings.)
If most of the boat is "good enough for governemnt work", enjoy the sailing season, save the renovations for the winter layup.
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Old 16-05-2007, 22:02   #8
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By in quantity...

If you have the boat close with good storage then you can buy in quantity.

Buy your screws, bolts etc in boxes of 100 or 200. Buy 10 sheets of ply at a time, get an order together at your local timberyard etc.

And working on a boat while it rolls is the pits.

But do get some scaffolding round the boat (falling off a boat on the hard can ruin your day). Makes painting much easier.

And if it all includes a hoist for removing the engine so much the better.
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Old 16-05-2007, 22:12   #9
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Aloha Charlie,
I have my boat in my side yard. It is a pleasure not having to travel to and from the boat for each piece of equipment or tool that I might have forgotten. The only drawback is not being able to use the boat for what is was intended. That's why I helped start our local yacht club. I have about 22 different boats I can sail if I can't sail my own.
It cost me about $3K to get it here including the cradle/trailer and has been well worth it.
Good luck on your decision.
Kind Regards,
JohnL
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Old 16-05-2007, 23:25   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie
Andy:

I am trying to get the boat ready for an October 2008 departure for Mexico. I wish I had more time use the boat and get to know her as you say. Sceptre's (like Freya's) were finished in many different manners, some by the shop some by the owners and some were redone in a way that doesn't make sense to me (that's my boat). I have to check all the wiring b/c of some of the things that I have found so far lead me to believe that there maybe unsafe wiring on the boat.
.
Yo Charlie,

My Freya hails from the Bay area, San Leandro.

As I recall, I spent a few weeks getting her ready for the delivery, fully preparing for any bad weather. During that time all standing rigging was replaced, and a new roller-furler and removable inner forestay were added at Svenson's Yacht Yard (really terrific experience--real pros). Fuel was polished, filters changed, batteries replaced, and safety gear added. Additionally several new sails were made by Doyle Sailmakers next door, and all others serviced. We were prepared for anything!

In flat seas we motored the entire delivery bringing her to her new (temporary) home of Ventura, in a little under 48 hours. Hope your delivery is as uneventful as was mine.

Driehuyzen's work was featured in one of Mate's books. Yours I presume is the lovely seaworthy-looking pilot house version. These have the wonderful step-through transom, and a sturdy skeg-mounted rudder. A beautiful boat. Post a photo if you can.

When we first get a boat we are excited to make the changes to her which will make her feel like she is OURS. We even often want to change the name to something WE picked. WAIT! Let the boat speak to you. Every time you go aboard or sail her she will tell you what it is she needs most. How she'd like you to spend your time and money on her. Which you will do. Gladly! Because unlike many "things", she will also pat you on the back when you do what she needs you to do.

First, you'll want to assure her seaworthy sailing condition. Perhaps upgrade safety equipment. Repair any deck/window leaks. Make any repairs necessary to a safe and comfortable delivery, if you so choose.

Listen to her. She will tell you what she needs.

best, andy
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Old 17-05-2007, 20:15   #11
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Put her in the back yard. At first you will be really excited to work on her, but then things will cool a bit. Your worst enemy will be loss of interest and the farther away she is, the more likely you will lose interest. You may find yourself saying, "Well, maybe I'll just watch TV tonight instead of working on the boat"..... Make yourself go out every evening and do some little something....and as soon as you get out there, you'll get all excited again. I do little projects on our boat every winter and have grown to love working on her almost as much as sailing her.
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Old 17-05-2007, 21:25   #12
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I'm really leaning towards bringing the boat home. Some of the points that you guys make are really hitting home.

HS didn't think about the home amenities bed shower and Kitchen. Tools shop and time are very important though.

Borcay: Buying in volume will help get the price down. That's for sure.

Skpr: Glad to know that I'm not the only one doing it. I've still got a little boat to sail and friends with boats.

TN: I'll try and post a picture of my boat. I've got the family agreeing to a certain time frame leave for Mexico 10/08. Having the boat here will give me the best chance to make that schedule. There are somethings about the boat that are obvious. Others will need some thought. I'll start with the wiring and plumbing and then proceed from there.

NM: The idea of boat project burnout was something that hadn't crossed my mind. Having the boat here will make a big difference on that.
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Fair Winds,

Charlie

Between us there was, as I have already said somewhere, the bond of the sea. Besides holding our hearts together through long periods of separation, it had the effect of making us tolerant of each other's yarns -- and even convictions. Heart of Darkness
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Old 17-05-2007, 21:40   #13
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Hey Charlie!!

I sure hope that you do bring your boat to your backyard.

Like the others have already said. It can motivate you. Save time. And just buy in bulk. The materials you need to get the boat up to your taste.

And I do look forward to seeing some photos of that boat of yours.

Good luck Charlie!!
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Old 18-05-2007, 07:54   #14
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You'll be absolutely amazed at how many things fall in the water if you're working on the boat. We'd call them offerenings to the sea gods!

Working on a boat in the water in bad weather is not very pleasant.

Working and having to live in the disorder one make while working can be discouraging.

A boat in the water requires regular "maintenance". I don't think as much maintenance is required while you're on the hard.

Four hours of driving at say 2? gallons of gas an hour times $3 a gallon. starts to build up after a while. Combine that with how much you value your time. It cause us a minimum of $50 per hour for boat work. So each trip you make down to the boat is costing something like $225 in just getting there and back. How much is the trucking?
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Old 18-05-2007, 08:03   #15
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Another issue! It is going to absolutely amaze you how many things you don't have to complete a job!!! Unless you've done that job in the same boat numerous time, you'll find you don't have that wrench you need, you're out of 5200, that electrical terminal won't fit on the post, it's the wrong size for the wire, ran out of polyurethane, out of the right size clamp... The list goes on, and on, and on. If you're close to the boat, no biggy you fire up the wireless, order what you need and work on something else. If you're two hours away, you stress and fret. Spend hours driving around searching for a substitute and generally P&$$ing yourself off because you forgot it in the first place. Being 20 minutes from West Marine, Sailorman, Boater's world... etc was such a God send for us while we were working on ours. But the number of trips we made!!!!!!
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