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Old 13-04-2007, 12:02   #31
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Originally Posted by ssullivan
Anyway, working through all the options of finding a suitable cheap boat, a SMALL boat never once entered my mind. Why? A boat's ability to deal with seas is directly linked to its LWL.
Which vessel is the more sea worthy?

1. Pacific Seacraft Dana LOA: 27' LWL:21
OR

2. Catalina 36: LOA:36? LWL:?

Give me the PS Dana any day, any ocean.

Granted given the PS Dana or the PS 40, for ocean sailing, there's no question I'd prefer the big boy. But to say that an ocean sailboat can't be less than such and such in length is a recipe for disaster. One must look at several design features FISRT, LOA should be down the line.
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Old 13-04-2007, 12:21   #32
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Echo rtbates

Unlike some people, I think island hopping through the Bahamas/Caribbean is 'real' cruising and a BeneCataHunter is not a bad choice to do it in. But, if I'm crossing oceans or even doing multi-day passages, I'd rather do it in a bluewater boat regardless of size.
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Old 13-04-2007, 13:35   #33
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Echo rtbates

Unlike some people, I think island hopping through the Bahamas/Caribbean is 'real' cruising and a BeneCataHunter is not a bad choice to do it in. But, if I'm crossing oceans or even doing multi-day passages, I'd rather do it in a bluewater boat regardless of size.
Absolutely. It's my kind of cruising. I would like to have a vessel though that given rising wind/sea conditions when say 25-50 miles offshore you have the option to head for deeper waters knowing you can safely heave to on the off shore tack and relax. Otherwise your only choice is to close the coast in worsening conditions. I don't like the odds that if you do this enough times you'll eventually get punished.
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Old 13-04-2007, 14:40   #34
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Originally Posted by rtbates
Which vessel is the more sea worthy?

1. Pacific Seacraft Dana LOA: 27' LWL:21
OR

2. Catalina 36: LOA:36? LWL:?

Give me the PS Dana any day, any ocean.

Granted given the PS Dana or the PS 40, for ocean sailing, there's no question I'd prefer the big boy. But to say that an ocean sailboat can't be less than such and such in length is a recipe for disaster. One must look at several design features FISRT, LOA should be down the line.
Ahhh... but of course. My questioning relative to the LWL and Displacement is assuming identical built quality and hull shape. I'm with you on this one. I'd rather set out in a well built canoe than a poorly built 100 footer.

One danger of a large boat that Gypsy Rose pointed out somewhere in another thread, which I completely agree with is the increased chance of injury when you actually *are* rolled. The cabins have too much space sometimes, and of course a pitch pole on a very long boat would be unthinkable... long distance up and back down to the water!!

I'm not really for or against anything, but simply questioning. In my own experience having owned a 21 footer, 30 footer, 45 footer, and having worked on a 100 footer, I found the larger the boat (dispacement and LWL) the less rolling, pitching, "washing machine action" and generally more comfort underway and as other boats leave wakes underway or at anchor.

Personally, I have my eye on the Lightship we have at the marina I'm at right now. Ultimate stability and comfort.
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Old 14-04-2007, 07:49   #35
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Absolutely. It's my kind of cruising. I would like to have a vessel though that given rising wind/sea conditions when say 25-50 miles offshore you have the option to head for deeper waters knowing you can safely heave to on the off shore tack and relax. Otherwise your only choice is to close the coast in worsening conditions. I don't like the odds that if you do this enough times you'll eventually get punished.
Absolutely ! I have been sailing for over 40 years now. Never owned a GPS. Been out in some bad stuff in a very seaworthy 30 foot schooner. First thing we would do was make sure we had enough sea room to ride it out. Make sure there was coffee, dog everything down and settle in for an uncomfortable day or two. What's important is a sextant, a compass, and a radio.
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Old 14-04-2007, 08:41   #36
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Great photo of your boat. She is a beauty. Just curious about your pennants/flags flying. Can you tell me what they are?
JohnL
Yeah, the Bahamaian courtesy flag on the Starboard side, the Norwegian flag on the Port side. (The Master's Nationality )
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Old 14-04-2007, 11:31   #37
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I can only heartily agree with the OP on the merits of going sailing in whatever size boat you can handle and afford and be comfortable on as opposed to sitting on the sidelines.
That said....full time cruising on a small boat is not appealing to ME personally as there are too many compromises to my comfort and lifestyle in smaller boats AND I feel a LOT safer at sea in a larger, heavier displacement boat. Since I can afford it...why not? I think a lot of couples end up selling and moving ashore rather quickly due to the "camping out" nature of many smaller vessels. Since we spend 90% of our time at anchor...the ameneties of a larger boat figure large in our personal satisfaction with cruising. I think it is a rare couple that can be happy for years living aboard a 35' boat and I think that is why you see so many over 40' boats out cruising today. Nothing wrong with either way...just the way it is.
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