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Old 27-07-2005, 12:55   #1
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Any bright sparks?

Last time I was on my boat I found that my bilge pump had failed. I had 3 bits of luck
It had been raining heavily – so I noticed
A ships chandlers was a few hundred meters away
The guy in the next boat was a marine electrician by trade

The point being that for what must be the third easiest electrical job on a boat (after changing light bulbs and fuses, I was missing tool, bits and pieces and knowledge all lucky supplied by the boat in the next birth.

So what I need help with is a list of basic tools/equipment; spares list and recommendation on a simple but comprehensive marine electrical text(s) AKA Marine electronic for dummies. If the list covered coastal and remote cruising separately that would be even better.

Thanks as always

Paul
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Old 27-07-2005, 20:54   #2
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Orrrr, you kidnapp the electrician and do a smash and grab at the chandlery and high tail it out of port
I am sure Gord will provide an excellent link to some article.
But this is what I have. Start with a small plastic drawer ssytem you can easily stow somewhere. In that I have a wide range of wiring connectors, terminals and crimps, Solder, heatshrink, fuses, etc.
A wire stripper and connector crimper combined tool. My soldering iron which is stored along side the box and a small gas torch for heating the large battery type connectors and lugs. And a hot glue gun and insulation tape. I keep a few "special" size screw drivers, a small adjustable wrench and a few smaller drill bits in a drawer as well. When I need to do work on something, I pick the entire container up and carry to job and have everything I need.
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Old 28-07-2005, 10:47   #3
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Crimpers

I recommend a high-quality automatic ‘double crimp’ ratcheting crimper (rather than the simple plier type tool), like the Ancor #701030: http://www.ancorproducts.com/Product...ers/pdf/99.pdf
or the Ideal #83-001, Klein #T1710 or T1715, and etc.

I don’t recommend Combination Strip/Crimp Pliers, like the Ancor #701007 http://www.ancorproducts.com/Product...ers/pdf/97.pdf

I also like ‘automatic’ wire strippers such as the Ideal “Stripmaster” #45-092
http://www.idealindustries.com/ht/WireStrippers.nsf

Crimping Instructions, from Ancor Marine: http://www.ancorproducts.com/Product...ors/pdf/39.pdf
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Old 28-07-2005, 12:07   #4
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Thanks

any suggestion re soldering irons and books
are meters any use for the inexperienced or will I achieve as much with a 12v globe.

Paul
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Old 28-07-2005, 13:03   #5
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I recommend a quality Digital Multimeter (DMM), like the Fluke 78 or 80 Series, or the cheaper series 12. While Fluke is certainly not the only worthy brand, it’s the one I’m most familiar with.

Features that I consider essential or highly desirable in a multimeter include:

* Digital multimeter (much easier to read) with analog bargraph (for peaking/nulling)
* Autoranging (make sure it works sufficiently fast; some cheap ones do not)
* Basic D.C. accuracy ?±0.3% and basic A.C. accuracy ?±2.0%
* Maximum D.C. and A.C. voltage readings of at least 600V, preferably more
* Minimum D.C. and A.C. voltage readings (sensitivity) of 1mV, preferably less
* A.C. and D.C. current ranges (not all meters have these!), preferably up to 10A at least
* Clamp-on Accessory (DC Amps - Hall Effect)
* Good internal safety circuitry, to protect both you and the meter, especially on the current-reading ranges
* Continuity test beeper and/or reading hold circuitry
* True R.M.S. A.C. measurements (optional - usually expensive)


“Beat the Book” ~ Testing Electrical Systems with a Digital Multimeter
http://assets.fluke.com/appnotes/aut...e/beatbook.pdf

You shouldn't need a soldering iron.
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Old 28-07-2005, 13:53   #6
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Gordy


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Old 29-07-2005, 07:27   #7
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Nigel Calder's "Boatowners Mechanical And Electrical Manual" in my opinion is invaluable and I have started my own business as a marine electrical and refrigeration tech and feel indebted to it for its help.(No i'm not getting rich) Between this manual and help from people on this forum there is not much one can't figure out. " thanks Gord and Wheels for all of your input".
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Old 29-07-2005, 21:32   #8
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[QUOTE]Alan Wheeler once whispered in the wind:
[B]Orrrr, you kidnapp the electrician and do a smash and grab at the chandlery and high tail it out of port

...on that high speed sail boat on mine.

heat shrink. gotta love it.



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Old 03-08-2005, 04:06   #9
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Paul,

I always use only tinned wire specifically designed for the marine environment ever since I almost went mad trying to work out why a light would not work on my last boat. After replacing globe, fitting and fuse, it turned out the wire - standard figure 8 twin, was not marine grade and was suffering high resistance; sufficient power would come through to give a voltage reading on meter, but insufficient to fire light (fluro).

Other advice I can give is to obtain a butane powered soldering iron. The one I have has a changeable tip to convert to a mini blow torch for heatshrink etc.

Watch out that the volts and amps do not mutiny and turn your boat into a nightmare; they will do it to you if you don't let them know who is boss!!

Fair winds

Steve
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