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Old 09-02-2010, 18:55   #16
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Surprised nobody mentioned 1st boat determines single anchor or two anchors.


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Old 10-02-2010, 05:50   #17
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In many Mediterranean anchorages boats anchor very close, especially during the day. It took us a long time to stop being very British about it. There is no (very little) tide so boats are blown around and do move differently. It is very common to see anchored boats with their fenders out.

The best we ever saw was in the Rade de Villefranche, near Nice, one very lovely, very windless August Saturday. The anchorage filled up with the little sports boats popular there, who chuck out maybe scope +10% so they can swim and eat and snooze before heading back to port. One little boat didn't even do that, but nosed gently into the crowded water, found a spot and simply switched their engine off. Family flopped in and out of the water, enjoyed themselves, and (to our relief) always had someone actually on board. Boat floated quite happily, everyone had a nice day and off they all went about 1600.

Meanwhile RG also sat there unmoving on her 4-x-scope of chain and we had a pleasant, if gobsmacked, time.
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Old 10-02-2010, 06:46   #18
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I'd just like to add a point about anchoring with trawlers. Most trawlers have significantly higher bows than sailboats. Our's is 11' off the water. This means that we need more rode out to keep the same scope as the other boats in the anchorage. So when you set your anchor and back down in front of a trawler, realize that if you swing around, the trawler will swing back further.
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Old 10-02-2010, 08:16   #19
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I am French...

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Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
Probably just "stay away from those who anchored before you" will do. Also, if you are French, then PLS do not piss from your cockpit.

b.
And I never pissed from my cockpit.

But I remember once in Jersey - Channel Islands during a stopover from a regatta, late in the night, 2 englishmen taking loudly on the pontoon beside my boat....

We where sleeping in the aft cabin, few centimeters away from these "gentlemen" actually, and could hear anything from them.

They started to piss on my boat, believing probably they could not be heard or seen.

One of them was asking if it was right to do so, and the other one replying that it was not a problem, as "the French use to do so on their own boat".

They did not finished and ran away more than quickly when I popped of the boat with my solid Hydraulic system handle and jump to beat them.

So not all the french do so, FYI, and apparently some englishmen are doing it as well.

To rectify the legend...
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Old 10-02-2010, 08:36   #20
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Probably just "stay away from those who anchored before you" will do. Also, if you are French, then PLS do not piss from your cockpit.

b.
Yeah!!
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Old 10-02-2010, 09:01   #21
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In some anchorages in the Channel Islands the first-boat rule is trumped by the local custom of always setting a stern anchor so that more boats can take advantage of the cove. I've found this to be especially true on Santa Cruz Island. So the best bet if you're the first boat and you decide to set a single hook is to have a stern anchor at the ready, especially on weekends during the summer months, because crowds can happen pretty quick. If four boats join you an a small cove right before sunset, your insistence that you were there first is going to fall on deaf ears by your neighbor, who may very well respond, "Dude, I anchor here every weekend, and we ALWAYS set stern anchors in this cove."
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Old 10-02-2010, 09:30   #22
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Could someone explain in simple terms the etiquette involved in anchoring.
Next summer my plans are to do some coastal cruising off Southern California but am lacking experience in blue water cruising. A couple of procedures which concern me are, when entering a bay, cove, etc to anchor, is it necessary to attempt hailing a Harbor Master requesting transient mooring or permission to anchor? If it is obvious that no Harbor Master is in control does one simply make oneself at home obviously insuring sufficient swing room to prevent interference with other anchored vessels? When is it necessary to contact a Harbor Master for anchoring or mooring permission?
There are not a ton of anchoring oppurtunities (sp?) in all of Southern California. Many of those are restricted by the harbormaster. "The Cruisisng Guide to Central and Southern California is a very good book in regards to finding the different anchorages that are available and who you need to check in with. Kings Harbor requirea a check in and that you use two anchors. Catalina island has pretty deep anchorage areas, Dana Point requires you to check in and has two anchorages (stay away from the one close to the bait dock). The Channel Islands have plenty of anchorages but they are a long trip for a 26' boat. Then again can't a M26 do something like 14 knots. If you do then it will be pretty easy to get out to the islands. Here is a link to another request for info on West Coast Anchorages, West Coast US Anchorages
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Old 10-02-2010, 09:49   #23
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If four boats join you an a small cove right before sunset, your insistence that you were there first is going to fall on deaf ears by your neighbor, who may very well respond, "Dude, I anchor here every weekend, and we ALWAYS set stern anchors in this cove."
Legally, local custom has no bearing if it is not documented where due diligence by a captain would find it as authoritative. Anchorages under the control of a harbor master abide by the rules s/he spells out, like King harbor etc.

I would not take the chance of being legally liable for damages just because " I anchor here every weekend".


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Old 10-02-2010, 10:17   #24
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I'm not competent to offer legal advice, but...

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Legally, local custom has no bearing if it is not documented where due diligence by a captain would find it as authoritative. Anchorages under the control of a harbor master abide by the rules s/he spells out, like King harbor etc.

I would not take the chance of being legally liable for damages just because " I anchor here every weekend".
...it seems wise to me to be particularly attentive to local norms and procedures when you're a visitor. In some locales anchoring within 100 meters is too close by local standards, in others if you're 50 meters apart there's room for another boat between you. There are often local anchoring conventions that deal with specific conditions that may not be experienced elsewhere. The wise cruiser will learn these conventions in advance, usually by studying cruising guides.

My experience in Santa Cruz Island is that the second boat will invariably drop a stern anchor even if the first boat did not. While I'm in no way endorsing this procedure, I'm pointing out that it happens, and that the first boat is well advised to have to have a stern hook at the ready. This is especially true if the first boat has "San Francisco" painted on the transom, and the second boat's home port is Ventura.
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Old 10-02-2010, 10:31   #25
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Apart from etiquette it is a simple equation - if you anchor after another boat and the other doesn't drag and you 'bump' then you pay the damages to the other boat.
Locquatious (sic.) - I lived aboard in English and Falmouth harbors for months last year, and nobody has their fenders out in the manner you described; even during Race Week. Now if one is in Jost Van Dyke Great Harbour for New Year's that is a different matter, one can almost walk ashore from boat to boat, but not in Antigua.
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Old 10-02-2010, 11:14   #26
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Most trawlers have significantly higher bows than sailboats. Our's is 11' off the water. This means that we need more rode out to keep the same scope as the other boats in the anchorage.
You can reduce your rode length and swinging radius by installing a U-bolt in a bow 1-2 feet above the waterline and attaching your snubber line to it.
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Old 10-02-2010, 11:28   #27
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You can reduce your rode length and swinging radius by installing a U-bolt in a bow 1-2 feet above the waterline and attaching your snubber line to it.
Everything's a tradeoff but there are too many negatives in my mind about doing that. I'd rather just anchor further out.
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Old 10-02-2010, 11:38   #28
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Other than drilling holes and making the fitting watertight, what other negatives do you see?
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Old 10-02-2010, 11:50   #29
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The U-bolt would be 10 feet away and unreachable (except from a dinghy). If anything got fouled up, it would happen at the exact worst time. Examples would be the need to quickly bring the anchor in or letting more rode out. Like most people who anchor a lot, I've had to do both. I wouldn't want to be messing around with a "remote" U-bolt in those situations or relying on contraptions to clip and unclip a snubber line.
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Old 10-02-2010, 11:56   #30
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In either case of letting more rode out, or bringing the anchor it, you will need to disconnect the snubber line from the rode, not from the boat attachment point. You still have an option of cutting the line off in case you cannot undo the knot. I am confused here...
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