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Old 31-07-2020, 09:11   #16
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Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?

Internal stuff like pumps, hoses, wiring, various things like that can be done in the water.
Minimal outside stuff on deck can be done. No extensive sanding/painting etc.
You can finish the trim etc of an interior in the water. I did one, I bought a small belt sander unit, a small table top bandsaw and put them inside the boat. But not advised in a fancy marina.
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Old 31-07-2020, 09:18   #17
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Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?

It depends where you are. Probably best tell everyone. From the sounds of posts so far it seems US marina's aren't nice places.

I've not been in an EU marina that cared if you painted, sanded, cut wood on the dock. I painted my deck in Lefkas, and did more work in Cartagena. No-one cares, unless there is a complaint, and that is going to depend what you are doing and how close other boats are to you. In many european marinas over winter it would be easy to get put way out of the way.

Some boayards also have docks, and of course you can do as you wish there, but space but more limited.

It is much easier working on the boat in the water in terms of getting things on and off it, but a boatyard, (less so a marina) will have good working space, and if you are lucky access to a workshop.

Loads of stuff can be done at anchor too. In fact that is where most of my work is done.
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Old 31-07-2020, 13:01   #18
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Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?

Will you be in a marina that keeps boats in the water 12 months a year, or do you haul for winter, like Capt. JGW in Muskegon, MI? In the spring, lots of work is done before the boats go back in the water. In warm climates the boats are hauled only once every several years, so other rules apply, as indicated in other answers. I bought a boat in San Diego and did quite a bit of work in the water- even installed a wood working vice in the sail locker. Working on week days, I didn't bother anyone who wasn't also working on their boat.
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Old 31-07-2020, 15:48   #19
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Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?

Would suggest you space work around need for Anti-foul.
Or if you plan dry storage for Tropical reasons, cyclone, travel etc they usually have a storage place quite cheap, & would allow some work, probably can't live aboard, no power, but will move you to work area when required.

Work on topsides can be difficult on water.
Last dock, I found issues immediately after leaving that required docking, decided to watch area and plan a quick intermediate docking (Corrosion in Rudder stock tube) getting lifted out is expensive, keep costs low is second priority to subsequential costs.
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Old 31-07-2020, 16:05   #20
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Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?

Quote:
Originally Posted by vpbarkley View Post
Some underwater work can be performed by a diver. Our diver can change a prop and cutlass bearing in addition to the more common work like replacing zincs and cleaning inlets.

Something like replacing through hull fittings always requires hauling.
Actually, through-hulls are easily replaced without hauling the boat. Even drilling for new through-hulls and installing flanged fittings is pretty quick and easy (using a pneumatic drill - NOT ELECTRIC). I was a commercial scuba diver for 5 years in the early '80s and we did all manner of repair work without haulouts....including R&R props, shafts, rudders, through-hulls and the like.

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Old 31-07-2020, 16:35   #21
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Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?

SAIL IT!


Keep it in the water, do small repair jobs that are quick and easy and don't disable the boat for long periods. Sail the boat in between projects. You will get a much better idea about what she needs under sail than sitting in front of a computer. The world is littered with abandoned half finished renovation projects. Sailing her reminds you of why you are doing this and keeps your momentum and inspiration up. And a boat in sailing condition is MUCH easier to sell than a disassembled project.
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Old 31-07-2020, 16:39   #22
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Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?

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Actually, through-hulls are easily replaced without hauling the boat. Even drilling for new through-hulls and installing flanged fittings is pretty quick and easy (using a pneumatic drill - NOT ELECTRIC). I was a commercial scuba diver for 5 years in the early '80s and we did all manner of repair work without haulouts....including R&R props, shafts, rudders, through-hulls and the like.

Eric

Must be quick, but I would not call it easy. Pneumatic drills are not all that common. I have replaced one seacock in the water, solo. Not a good neophyte project for the OP.
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Old 31-07-2020, 18:40   #23
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Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?

While a lot depends on where the marina is located the 800 pound in the room no one seems to want to talk about is what in the US is called EPA (or in FL is the FDEP) rules. A lot of things like sanding, grinding, and painting can require stuff to minimize any possible pollution. Lots of marinas require work to be done by licensed, bonded, and insured workers. Sure there are marinas, and yards as well, that allow DIY work; but they are becoming harder to find and their numbers are decreasing.

One of the reasons you will find so many posts saying the most expensive thing you can buy is a cheap boat is not just that you never know what needs to be fixed but that you also have to find a place to fix it.
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Old 02-08-2020, 10:08   #24
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Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?

Also depends on who is doing the work. Some marinas and yards only allow insured list of workers to work on their premises. Also as a general rule - anything that you do onboard takes longer - every forgotten tool, every recut of something involves going to the car and heading back to where you prep things. Other than a hassle for yourself - if your paying someone else to do the work - travel time adds up.

Wiring and a lot of painting - esp interior makes little difference - but otherwise I vote for not launching until you have all or nearly all of the cutting and fitting of pieces parts installed. The job is done faster (cheaper) when on the land blocked up. Working on a boat is a lot like working on a house renovation. There is an art to scheduling and sequencing the work that makes it go smoothly and more quickly without do overs and wasted money.

I have the best of both worlds in that my 55 year old boat is kept at the dock at home with power and air lines run from my car garage/shop. But even then I annually pull the boat to do whatever is need on the bottom - the metal running gear seldom can go any longer than that. I have even spray painted the decks and cabin while in the water before with Awlgrip but when the hull and bootstripe needed it the work was scheduled so it could be done with the rest of the bottom stuff while on blocks.

A lot also depends on your handyman abilities. Plus your willingness to invest in the proper tools needed. Good quality wiring crimpers -Not from auto parts store - good table saw if actual remodeling of interior spaces are to be done, a variety of drills (straight - right angle), and IMO an occellating sander/saw like a Fein, torch, feeler gauges, multi-meter with clamp-on ammeter, etc. Not everything can be done with a jigsaw and a hammer.

Decide before you buy how much you are actually willing and capable of doing before jumping in. I wish I had a dollar for every project boat I've seen get started on that never made it to the water after a year or more being started on. Sometimes the yard bill gets higher than what they can sell the boat for. Seen too many times.

If your not really ready to take on a big project and finish it maybe you should spend a little more and get something you can use right away.
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Old 02-08-2020, 10:20   #25
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Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?

PS: I have owned my 55 year old boat for 30 of those years and until recently would not considered it "finished". From stem to stern literally hundreds of things have been removed/ replaced/added since 1990. Anchor pulpit and windlass, flying bridge, aluminum radar arch, all mechanical stuff - genset, engines, electronics (a couple of times) - only original mechanical items left are the rudders. The amount of wiring has probably tripled since manufacturer turned the boat out for sale in 1965.

But by staging and not biting off too much any one year the boat has been able to be used for family time every year but one or two summers.

Just don't make it so that you don't (especially family or they will loose patience) get frustrated and not see the value of what you are doing.
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