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Old 05-03-2020, 10:09   #1
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Adult Vaccination

Data from the Public Health Agency of Canada suggests that most of us think we're up to date with our shots — but, often, we're not.
While 88 per cent of individuals "believed that they received all of the vaccines recommended for someone their age," only 3 per cent of respondents "reported having received all of the recommended adult vaccines for their age/risk group," according to the 2016 Adult National Immunization Coverage Survey.
http://publications.gc.ca/collection...2-2018-eng.pdf

What vaccines do I need as an adult?

Make sure you had your childhood shots for:
Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR).
Polio.
Varicella (chicken pox).

From age nine up to age 45:
Human Papillomavirus (HPV): The vaccine prevents several types of cervical cancer. It can be given as early as age nine and up to age 45.

At 24 years of age or younger:
Meningococcal (meningitis).

As an adult (all ages):
Tetanus and diphtheria: Booster shot every 10 years. Vaccines for both are now given together. Check to make sure your last tetanus vaccination included diphtheria protection.
Pertussis (whooping cough): One dose as an adult and during each pregnancy.
Varicella, f you think you're among the minority of people who didn't have chicken pox as a child (your doctor can check with a blood test):


Seasonal (every year because the strain of influenza changes):
Flu shot.

For seniors:
Shingles (vaccine can be given as early as age 50, definitely recommended at age 60 and over): Shingles causes not only a rash, but excruciating pain. Nerve damage is sometimes permanent.
Pneumococcal (vaccine recommended for all adults age 65 and over, as well as younger adults with certain chronic conditions or a compromised immune system): Can cause bacterial pneumonia and other invasive infections, including sepsis. Seniors are especially vulnerable.

Other vaccines may be recommended for some adults — talk to your doctor:
Hepatitis A.
Hepatitis B.
Travel vaccines (can include Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, cholera, meningococcal, Japanese encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis, rabies, typhoid, yellow fever).

(Source: Public Health Agency of Canada)
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Old 05-03-2020, 10:51   #2
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Re: ADULT VACCINATION

Thanks for the post GordMay. A great reminder.
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Old 05-03-2020, 10:57   #3
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Re: ADULT VACCINATION

FWIW: both chronic exercise and exercise around getting a shot may increase the immune system's ability to produce antibodies against the proteins in the vaccination. See:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3903912/
"They showed that older active men demonstrated stronger antibody and cell-mediated responses to [a clinically useless test vaccination] than sedentary older men, while responses were similar regardless of activity habits in younger men."

Generally speaking, one's immune system seems to be nature's decider of who should/should not have their biomass completely redistributed at an earlier age.
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Old 05-03-2020, 11:39   #4
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Re: ADULT VACCINATION

Travel Immunizations for Adults

The immunizations you need depend on where you are going, how long you are staying, and how you will be traveling.
The following vaccines are the common immunizations recommended for adult travelers.

Polio
Polio is a disease caused by infection with a virus. People get it by eating food or drinking water contaminated with feces. You may require a dose of Inactivated Polio Vaccine (IPV) if you are going to areas where polio is present and you have not been vaccinated before, or if you have not had a one-time booster against polio.
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis A is a disease caused by infection of the liver with the hepatitis A virus. People get it by eating contaminated food or drinking water. One dose of hepatitis A vaccine can provide good short-term protection. A second dose of vaccine should be given later for life-time protection.
A combined vaccine against hepatitis A and B is also available.
Typhoid Fever
Typhoid Fever is a serious and life-threatening infection caused by typhoid bacteria. People get it by eating food or drinking water contaminated with feces.
There are 2 types of typhoid vaccine - oral (by mouth) and injection (by needle). The oral vaccine is given as a series of capsules to be taken at home. The injection vaccine is only 1 dose, given at the travel clinic.
Traveler's Diarrhea and Cholera
Traveler's diarrhea and cholera are caused by 2 different types of bacteria. People get these by eating contaminated food or drinking water. Cholera infection can be life-threatening if severe and not treated. There are 2 types of oral vaccine - liquid and capsule. The vaccine is given as a series of doses to be mixed in water taken at home.
Influenza
Influenza, or the flu, is an infection of the nose, throat and lungs caused by the influenza virus. Influenza spreads easily from person to person through coughing, sneezing, or having close face-to-face contact. The vaccine is recommended if you plan to travel during the flu season. Flu season usually runs from November to April in the Northern hemisphere, from April to October in the Southern hemisphere, and year-round in tropical regions. One dose of the vaccine is usually given to adults. Sometimes 2 doses are given to children.
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis B is a disease caused by infection of the liver with the hepatitis B virus. It is spread by unprotected sexual intercourse, needle sharing, or rarely by infected blood products.
Hepatitis B can cause permanent liver damage. It is also the main cause of liver cancer, which can be fatal. The vaccine is recommended if you are visiting a country where hepatitis B is common and if you are staying 6 months or longer, or if you are expecting to have sexual relations or blood contact with local residents regardless of your length of stay. The vaccine is given as a series of 2 or 3 doses.
A combined vaccine against hepatitis A and B is available.
Japanese Encephalitis
Japanese encephalitis is a serious and life-threatening infection caused by a virus. It is spread by the bite of infected mosquitoes. The vaccine is sometimes recommended for travelers to rural areas of some Asian
countries. It is given as a series of 2 doses or shots 28 days apart.
Meningococcal Infection
Meningococcal infection is a serious and life-threatening infection caused by meningococcal bacteria. Infection is spread from one person to another by coughing, sneezing or close face-to-face contact. It can also be spread through saliva or spit when people share things like food and drinks.
The vaccine is recommended for travelers who have close contact with local residents in areas where epidemics are common. These areas may change, but commonly include parts of Africa and the Middle East. Vaccination is required for travellers to Mecca (for the annual "Haj"), 10 days prior to entry to Saudi Arabia.
Rabies
Rabies is an infection of the brain caused by a virus that is spread through the bite or scratch of an infected animal. Vaccination is recommended for travellers at risk of exposure to rabies and for visitors staying 1 month or longer in areas with a high risk of rabies, such as parts of Latin America, South East Asia, India and Africa. Travelling children are especially at risk due to their tendency to touch or play with wild or stray animals.
Yellow Fever
Yellow Fever is a serious and life-threatening infection caused by a virus. It is spread by the bite of infected mosquitoes. It is present in tropical areas of Africa, Central and South America.
The vaccine is given in 1 dose and must be taken at least 10 days before you travel to a tropical area. At the travel clinic, you will receive a stamped document called the International Certificate of Vaccination Against Yellow Fever. This document is an official record and a legal requirement for entry into some countries.

For a list of travel vaccines that you should consider when traveling to a particular country, visit the Public Health Agency of Canada travel.gc.ca/travelling/advisories.
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Old 05-03-2020, 17:40   #5
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Re: Adult Vaccination

Add the new Shingles Vaccine for all those who've had Chicken Pox as a kid. The new vaccine is way more effective than the old one shot treatment and should be taken in addition to the old one if you've had it. If you aren't familiar with shingles, it probably won't kill you, just make you wish it did. Symptoms are various and recovery can take months or even longer.
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Old 06-03-2020, 09:07   #6
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Re: Adult Vaccination

Quote:
Originally Posted by roverhi View Post
Add the new Shingles Vaccine for all those who've had Chicken Pox as a kid. The new vaccine is way more effective than the old one shot treatment and should be taken in addition to the old one if you've had it. If you aren't familiar with shingles, it probably won't kill you, just make you wish it did. Symptoms are various and recovery can take months or even longer.
FWIW: The original shingles vaccination (Zostavax) has been shown to reduce aggregate stroke risk by about 15% in older people. Logically the new vaccine ought to be as good, but it'll take years of monitoring to figure that out. But stroke risk reduction is an added benefit for shingles vaccination.
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