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KC Cruiser 30-09-2011 13:48

Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
My wife and I are in our mid-40’s living in Kansas. I have an incredibly good job, making low six-figures. We’re renting an apartment and have no debt. We want to kiss our comfortable world goodbye for life at sea. Our child finishes high school in 3 years, and 3-5 years seems like a great window for saving up a nice kitty and hitting the sea.

The problem is, I want to sail now! I envision three options:

1- Live simply, save like crazy, then go. This is the case Jim Trefethen makes in The Cruising Life. I understand the dollars and cents of it, but I’m itching to sail now!


2- Buy a charter, use it three weeks a year, and then cruise when I take ownership in 5 years. This is appealing because I could sail while I’m saving. The downside is that this might be a little expensive, and I have my doubts about whether good chartering boats make good cruising boats. For the money, is that the boat I want as my home?


3- Buy a trailer-sailor to sail on local lakes while I save. With this option, I could sail on weekends six months a year (I’m reasonably close to Perry Lake and Stockton Lake, and Kansas is windy). The downside is that owning a boat will be a drain on my finances and make it harder to save for the kitty.

What do you think I should do?

sailcruiser 30-09-2011 13:54

Re: Caught the Sailing BugÖ.in Kansas; Now What?
 
Get a small boat and learn to sail and trim it well. In that 5 years you'll gain a lot of knowledge with a small boat. Then when the time is right buy the boat that suits your cruising lifestyle desires and go. You actually learn to sail a lot better (IMHO) on a smaller boat. I find larger boats actually easier to sail than smaller. SC

sailorchic34 30-09-2011 14:02

Re: Caught the Sailing BugÖ.in Kansas; Now What?
 
Me I would get a little 20-22 foot sailboat for a few thousands and spend the time sailing and docking/ anchoring in lake Perry. Lake Perry is a good size to learn on. I sailed it once, years ago and sailed Smithville lake (north of the KC airport) for 6 months. If you can sail a 22 footer then a bigger boat will be easier. Plus you'll know more about sailing, weather, etc,etc.

In a few years start looking for a bigger boat closer to an ocean. You'll not loose too much money when you sell a 22' sailboat either.

sailorboy1 30-09-2011 14:16

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
If you look at that little boat as a money drain you aren't going to make it later.

Nothing wrong with a charter type boat as a cruiser! Just depends on which charter boat. Lots of people go the charter boat ownership route.

When I got the bug 4 years ago I:
-took ASA classes
-joined a local club and sailed 33' boats on the weekends for 3 months
-bought my first boat, a Cal-39 and sailed it for 2 seasons
-traded the Cal for a Hunter 410 that I'm sailing now with the goal of paying it off while building the cruising kitty for casting off in another 4-5 years

In the 3 years of ownership compared to the club boat I'm out not that much more money between the 2, as long as I disregard upgrades as far as operating/using the boat (not counting tthe payments).

No right answer beyound just being sure you get to go sailing!

krafthaus 30-09-2011 14:28

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
I agree. Take classes. Sail with a club and learn from others. Sounds like the smaller boat on your local lake would give you more opportunity to sail, learn, ask questions and then when the time comes for an upgrade you will make a better decision.

For some ocean fun, I'd suggest you sneak in a charter for one or two weeks in a year and that would give you the chance to try some different boats, maybe even a cat, different sizes, etc. Again, you will make a better decision in the end.

ADMPRTR 30-09-2011 14:38

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
The consensus seems pretty consistent, and it is what I agree with. Go small(er) first.

While Jim Trefethen makes some good points in "The Cruising Life" I disagree with his premise (as I understood it) to focus on the cruising kitty at the expense of all else: including owning a boat, taking lessons and not chartering. Going his route may get you there faster but you won't be as well prepared and may in fact find you don't like the lifestyle. There are people who have cashed out, got their boat down to the islands and then left it there to rot for what ever reason.

You may also find that sailing smaller soon will satisfy our itch for a few years as you build up your resources and skill.

wizard1_us 30-09-2011 14:49

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
I would agree with the rest of the advice on here as well. I've been sailing for about 30 years and I started out in a 22' Columbia. That boat taught me a lot of what I wanted in my next boat. Sail as many boats as you can get on, offer to be crew and each sailor will teach you something. I learned that I enjoyed full keeled boats better than fin keel, however to each their own, that's what makes it so interesting. After restoring a Cape Dory 27' (which is for sale, byw) I am now restoring A Cape Dory 31. As I get up in years, I am sure I will make the full circle like everyone else does, probably back to a Cape Dory Typhoon, she's 18.5 but a sweet sailer...Fair winds, Randy

sailorboy1 30-09-2011 15:06

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ADMPRTR (Post 787041)
The consensus seems pretty consistent, and it is what I agree with. Go small(er) first.


I didn't see any consensus for going smaller first. Only agreement that if that was only way to do regular sailing on the lake to do it.

Myself and lots of others have never stepped foot on a "small" boat! Not sure I would have been able to keep to my cruising goal alive if I had spent time crammed in one of those.

But I have no issue with accepting that for some this route seems correct. Just that to me the goal should be to spend as much time on boats in the size range you plan to end up with.

Boracay 30-09-2011 15:16

Devil's advocate...
 
If you're pulling in low 6 figures you don't really want to toss it all away in this economic clime. I'll conceded that those who pay you may be getting a little blood with their pound of flesh, but once the money's gone it may never come back.

I'll put a small bet that part of the few drops of blood that earns that money is not a lot of time. Now a small trailer/sailer would be great if you had a fair amount of time, but any boat is a full time commitment. It never goes away until you sell it. With a trailer sailor on the local lake you'll still be in Kansas.

The other aspect is that you don't mention family and friends, but they've got to be there somewhere. Putting your significant others in that cool lake air in a leaky old boat may not endear them to the concept of cruising. A catered charter in the warm laid back Caribbean on the other hand...

You probably get a few days off from time to time. Its a long way from Kansas to the Virgins, about a day each way, so you'd need a stretch of at least four days to make it work, so why not charter?

Once you step onto the boat all the stresses of Kansas may fade into the distance. Even if you never get the sails up you could be happier. And once you step off its not your problem anymore.

Its why they call it "island time", Mon.

Therapy 30-09-2011 15:20

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
I submit that with a "good job, making low six-figures" (that means 200k a year to me) and thinking a club membership or a trailer sailor will hurt you means you are wasting an awful lot of your income.

Join a club and see if you even like sailing.

Charter some to see what they are like.

Don't charter a cat. You will be sorry. They cost a lot more and you will want one. Almost guaranteed. And the wife - don't even let her visit one.

ADMPRTR 30-09-2011 15:30

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Don Lucas (Post 787061)
But I have no issue with accepting that for some this route seems correct. Just that to me the goal should be to spend as much time on boats in the size range you plan to end up with.

I guess it depends on how dedicated one is to the ultimate goal of sailing off. If one knows exactly what to do then yes, start off with the boat that best matches that plan.

OTOH, smaller boats are cheaper to buy and maintain and may be easier to sell, or at least, unload. It is a way to get into sailing with a modest investment.

I started off with a 26 footer and I went with that size because it was the largest I could afford (after realizing that 22ft had too many opportunities to bang my head). Then I moved to a 36ft when the 26 was too small and limiting. In both cases, I had a learning curve to over come.

But anyway, my main point, regardless of boat size, was to gain experience, and THAT does seem to be the consensus. If one goes the "Cruising Life" route you may end up with a nice nest egg and no confidence to use it.

Rakuflames 30-09-2011 15:34

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by KC Cruiser (Post 787013)
My wife and I are in our mid-40ís living in Kansas. I have an incredibly good job, making low six-figures. Weíre renting an apartment and have no debt. We want to kiss our comfortable world goodbye for life at sea. Our child finishes high school in 3 years, and 3-5 years seems like a great window for saving up a nice kitty and hitting the sea.

The problem is, I want to sail now! I envision three options:

1- Live simply, save like crazy, then go. This is the case Jim Trefethen makes in The Cruising Life. I understand the dollars and cents of it, but Iím itching to sail now!


2- Buy a charter, use it three weeks a year, and then cruise when I take ownership in 5 years. This is appealing because I could sail while Iím saving. The downside is that this might be a little expensive, and I have my doubts about whether good chartering boats make good cruising boats. For the money, is that the boat I want as my home?


3- Buy a trailer-sailor to sail on local lakes while I save. With this option, I could sail on weekends six months a year (Iím reasonably close to Perry Lake and Stockton Lake, and Kansas is windy). The downside is that owning a boat will be a drain on my finances and make it harder to save for the kitty.

What do you think I should do?


Sorry you're so sick! Thankfully, there's no cure! :popcorn:

ADMPRTR 30-09-2011 15:43

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
Wow, I was just looked at map of Kansas. Not to many lakes near by...

First thing: move to a coast (any coast) :)

offline 30-09-2011 16:37

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
Woo hoo... new sailors.

Get yourself a small boat and get some experience.

We have both a 14' Hunter and a 27' sloop... they are very different animals.

Go out as much with the small boats...as you can for a year or so. then start moving up. There are plenty of lakes in Kansas, Colorado, Texas that you can day sail..

When you are ready you'll be prepped with some experience..

Nothing wrong with buying a charter, but three weeks a year won't give you the experience you will want or need as you look for your final boat.

KC Cruiser 30-09-2011 21:47

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
Thanks for the advice everyone--here are some more details.

I have a moderate amount of sailing experience from my childhood, often going to lakes on my dadís sunfish, and later Catalina 22. I always loved sailing. After high school, I was always either too busy or too poor to sail, until this year when I took my wife on a bareboat adventure out of Tortola. It was magical.

The good news with regards to my renting lifestyle is that the weekends are pretty free--I donít have to worry about mowing the lawn, weeding the garden, or whatever else folks with houses have to do on weekends. That gives me the time to head up to Perry Lake.

Unfortunately, the golden job wouldnít follow me to the coast, so Iím stuck in Kansas for a while. While my personal inclination is to have fun with the challenge of a sailing a leaky small boat and enjoy the low financial risk of that, my wife thought the 37-footer we chartered was small, and ultimately sees herself in a 50-footer.

Choices for boats include a 22-foot Catalina for $3,000, a 30-foot Ericson for $16,000, or a 40-foot Hunter for $50,000.

Would the Ericson the best compromise?

sailorboy1 01-10-2011 04:12

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by KC Cruiser (Post 787223)
Would the Ericson the best compromise?

The compromise to what?

KC Cruiser 01-10-2011 07:21

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Don Lucas (Post 787298)
The compromise to what?

The compromise between an inexpensive boat to learn on, and a more expensive boat which is closer to what we want to eventually live on, but which puts a bigger strain on the kitty.

ADMPRTR 01-10-2011 07:47

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by KC Cruiser (Post 787223)
Unfortunately, the golden job wouldn’t follow me to the coast, so I’m stuck in Kansas for a while. While my personal inclination is to have fun with the challenge of a sailing a leaky small boat and enjoy the low financial risk of that, my wife thought the 37-footer we chartered was small, and ultimately sees herself in a 50-footer.

It depends on your long term goals and plans.

If the boat is only playing the role of keeping you on the water while you save up for the 50fter then go with the most economical one that achieves that goal. That translates into the smallest that you can see yourself sailing.

However, if you see yourself using that boat for a number of years (5 or more) then go for the biggest boat that you can afford that will match your sailing area (I don't know Lake Perry but on the map it looks a bit small for a 40fter and maybe too small for 30).

Remember the larger the boat, the more it costs. Not just purchase price but care and upkeep. In fact, the ongoing fees to keep a boat (in that price range) can easily double the price of the boat over a number of years (depending on what you do and where you keep it).

A 22ft trailer sailor costs very little to keep it at a marina. For example, 22ft is $1245 at Lake Perry Yacht & Marina) but 34ft is $2100 (which is a lot cheaper than what I pay BTW!). Also, there is maintenance and upgrades which gets more expensive as the boat increases in size and complexity.

I do agree in principal with the premise of the "The Cruising Life" which is to put a plan in place and minimize your expenses to achieve the plan. Were I differ is on his premise not to own or charter a boat (and on his view of galley sinks that I think is dumb :whistling:).

The problem with golden jobs is that they come with golden handcuffs and you may find yourself staying longer than you are currently thinking. That in itself is not bad, but I would recommend on planing for that contingency.

BTW, chartering someone else's boat (as opposed to buying a boat and placing it in charter) could be an expensive but worth while part of your plan. On the other hand, placing your boat in charter has hidden costs such as accelerated depreciation and is a risky way to buy a boat IMO.

For me, I have calculated that for what I spend on marina, maintenance, upgrades and loan and interest payments on my boat I could rent a charter for 3 or more weeks a year (which is what I typically use it) and get a shiny new boat instead of an old leaky one. Theoretically, at some point, my boat will be paid off but at that point it will be old and not worth much.

sailorboy1 01-10-2011 08:21

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by KC Cruiser (Post 787388)
The compromise between an inexpensive boat to learn on, and a more expensive boat which is closer to what we want to eventually live on, but which puts a bigger strain on the kitty.

I went thugh this when I got my first boat, a Cal-39. Not a small boat but not what I thought we really wanted. Two years later I moved to my current boat and after a year don't any regrets on it.

It would have been less costly to get the boat we wanted to start with. Probably was a $10,000 lesson.

The real trick to be able to know what you really want. If you do get it to start with!

Svsilvergirl 01-10-2011 09:41

I gotta agree with a couple of the posters here . We joined a sailing club and spent part of the summer learning to sail on small 22ft santana and a small cal with outboards . Beyond the first couple of outings , I truly did not enjoy sailing these things.......tiller in a tiny cockpit , trying to start a cranky lil outboard with your face smashed against the rear stay , club boats that have used up hardware and things that don't work.......if I had to spend years doing this , sure the dream and hobby might have turned into a motorhome dream . While we did learn the basics , I learned a heck of a lot more by crewing on other boats , that were closer to what we ended up buying . To each his own I guess , but I can't even compare the experience off sailing our 44 foot islander offshore , to sailing the lil club boats on the columbia river.......we bought the boat we wanted , and learned to sail it .

Me-and-Boo 03-10-2011 13:40

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
Ski Nebraska
Sail Kansas

Boracay 03-10-2011 14:29

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
What about checking out the Great Lakes?

They're a bit of a drive from where you are, but should be doable on a weekend trip. Just looking round should scratch the itch for a while, and you could bribe feed your SO's with nice food and accommodation.

Looks like there are a few yacht type places there that may do charters or whatever.

Lake Perry looks like you'd be blown out of the water by ski boats on any half decent weekend.

KC Cruiser 03-10-2011 15:01

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Don Lucas (Post 787425)
I went thugh this when I got my first boat, a Cal-39. Not a small boat but not what I thought we really wanted. Two years later I moved to my current boat and after a year don't any regrets on it.

It would have been less costly to get the boat we wanted to start with. Probably was a $10,000 lesson.

The real trick to be able to know what you really want. If you do get it to start with!

I'd definitely go with the boat we wanted, if we could get it in the place we wanted. A mid-western lake is already a big comprimise.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Boracay (Post 789101)
What about checking out the Great Lakes?

They're a bit of a drive from where you are, but should be doable on a weekend trip. Just looking round should scratch the itch for a while, and you could bribe feed your SO's with nice food and accommodation.

Looks like there are a few yacht type places there that may do charters or whatever.

Lake Perry looks like you'd be blown out of the water by ski boats on any half decent weekend.

We'd be looking at a 9-hour drive to Chicago or Milwaukee--I don't think that's close enough for what you're talking about. What are SO's? From what I can tell, ski boats don't like Perry that much--too windy for them.

edit to add: significant others, right? The wife is on-board with boating as long as its nice. The offspring just don't get it.

KC Cruiser 03-10-2011 15:05

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Svsilvergirl (Post 787478)
I gotta agree with a couple of the posters here . We joined a sailing club and spent part of the summer learning to sail on small 22ft santana and a small cal with outboards . Beyond the first couple of outings , I truly did not enjoy sailing these things.......tiller in a tiny cockpit , trying to start a cranky lil outboard with your face smashed against the rear stay , club boats that have used up hardware and things that don't work.......if I had to spend years doing this , sure the dream and hobby might have turned into a motorhome dream . While we did learn the basics , I learned a heck of a lot more by crewing on other boats , that were closer to what we ended up buying . To each his own I guess , but I can't even compare the experience off sailing our 44 foot islander offshore , to sailing the lil club boats on the columbia river.......we bought the boat we wanted , and learned to sail it .

Excellent point--crewing might be the best way to go--save some money, have more fun, and have a better experience along the way. Thanks!

rnjpinz 03-10-2011 15:20

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
Easy answer. Go to sailopo.com. If you are serious about cruising you can get hands on experience and in many cases the only cost is a plane ticket. Sail with Hank to Bermuda on Advocation, his 47 Swan and then pick and chose. Great organization.

jannpage 03-10-2011 18:00

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
Your wife is right if you don't have to pay for it or pay to repair it or pay to dock it or don't want to explore the shallow part of the world or are willing to quit early each day so you can find a good spot to anchor that is not to crounded (only to find that later in the day you are surounded by fools who don't know how to anchor but decide to croud in anyway) or want to sail some small lakes where the water is so clear you can think you can drink it. The point is a big boat has a lot of limitations. One of wick is there or tons of places you can't go.

The thing about wives and girl friends is it is pretty difficult to have more than one at a time but rarely do I have only one saiing vessel. Right now I have 4 with 3 in the water. One is only 9 ft and folds up and can travel in a a small trunk. One of my favorite sailing trips was with a 13ft that weighed less than 350 pounds ready to sail. I would bet I can find water within an hour or two of most parts of Kansas that would make a fine weekend retreat. When I lived on a small lake in Illinois I kept that 13ft on davits on my little dock. Eventually I realized my trailer/sailor was sitting in the drive and rarely used so I found a lake 50 miles or so with a couple of marinas and rented a slip. Changed the world. I Had a lot. A great job/business that was both fun and making a nice living and a great sailing club with pot lucks and a good racing schedual , pleasant weekend resturants. 5 pm or so Fri night saw us heading out for a min vacation that lasted till sometime Sunday.

On the Adriatic last year near Croatia I had the fun of watching an inflatatable cat under sail bounce along to windward keeping up with my Cat under power at 6.5 knots for all afternoon.

The point is - for me at least - wind in the sail is wind in the sail no mater if the boat is little boat or a big (mono, Cat or Tri) (wet or Dry). Get a boat and find some water to play in. Tell us where in Kansas you are and we will find you some opportunities.

Cheers.:banghead:

Cheechako 03-10-2011 18:21

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
You need sailing time. For your local waters It sounds like you need a smaller boat. 30 ft max. Dont pay too much. 28-30 will feel more like a real cruising experience. 22 ft will be good sailing experience but quite different than a bigger boat. Stick where you are and make your money. Been there done that and sometimes wish I had stuck for 3-5 more years. That's a lot of money!

KC Cruiser 08-10-2011 06:27

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by rnjpinz (Post 789136)
Easy answer. Go to sailopo.com. If you are serious about cruising you can get hands on experience and in many cases the only cost is a plane ticket. Sail with Hank to Bermuda on Advocation, his 47 Swan and then pick and chose. Great organization.

Interesting link--I think I'll register. Thanks!

Quote:

Originally Posted by jannpage (Post 789250)
The point is - for me at least - wind in the sail is wind in the sail no mater if the boat is little boat or a big (mono, Cat or Tri) (wet or Dry). Get a boat and find some water to play in. Tell us where in Kansas you are and we will find you some opportunities.

Cheers.:banghead:

Kansas City. Two excellent possibilities are Perry Lake and Stockton Lake. According to midwestsailing.com, they are the number 2 and number 1 sailing lakes in the midwest, respectively. Perry is about an hour a way, and Stockton is maybe 2.5--doable, but probably on the margin the bigger lake isn't worth the longer drive.

Putting a boat on a slip seems to be the key. Thanks for the encouragement!

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cheechako (Post 789264)
You need sailing time. For your local waters It sounds like you need a smaller boat. 30 ft max. Dont pay too much. 28-30 will feel more like a real cruising experience. 22 ft will be good sailing experience but quite different than a bigger boat. Stick where you are and make your money. Been there done that and sometimes wish I had stuck for 3-5 more years. That's a lot of money!

Great advice--my decision is definitely gravitating towards this plan.

I'm still getting stuck trying to figure out what is too much money. If we get a cheap boat, will it be less fun and a bigger headache? If we get an expensive one, will it be more fun and easier to get my loved ones on board?

Hotel L 08-10-2011 07:26

My 2 cents....find a cheap old(er) boat that is just large enough your family could spend the weekend or week on. Get a good survey to ensure it is sound.

Experience is not all about sail handling, there is maintenance, living habits, ext.

Over the next 5 years restore the boat, do all the work your self, and research the heck out of everything.

And most of all enjoy the time you spend with her. If you do I have no doubt you will love the sailing life.

mrohr 08-10-2011 08:07

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
Hi all: I really learned to sail on a dingy many years AFTER having crossed the Atlantic in a 46' cutter and sailed to Africa in a 72' yawl. It's much harder and more instructive to sail the smaller boats; and your mistakes will be much more apparent and less costly. If you can really handle the little ones you will be ready and able to buy that 4 masted schooner when the time comes.

KC Cruiser 08-10-2011 10:08

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Hotel L (Post 792254)
My 2 cents....find a cheap old(er) boat that is just large enough your family could spend the weekend or week on. Get a good survey to ensure it is sound.

Experience is not all about sail handling, there is maintenance, living habits, ext.

Over the next 5 years restore the boat, do all the work your self, and research the heck out of everything.

And most of all enjoy the time you spend with her. If you do I have no doubt you will love the sailing life.

That's a really interesting point that I never really considered--I've been so focused on getting out into the breeze that I didn't think about learning about maintenance; I've been leaning towards a boat without problems so that I could avoid dealing with the maintenance. Doing the opposite is a great idea--deliberately buy a fixer-upper so that I get the experience of not only maintatining, but actually improving and restoring a boat.

Great idea, thanks Hotel L!

Cheechako 08-10-2011 10:08

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
I'm still getting stuck trying to figure out what is too much money. If we get a cheap boat, will it be less fun and a bigger headache? If we get an expensive one, will it be more fun and easier to get my loved ones on board?

This is a generalization, but cheap or expensive, the things that go wrong with boats are much the same: Pumps, engines, rigging, sails etc. come from the same sources. You need a good hull, but there's no reason a Catalina wont be just as easy to maintain as a hinkley... probably cheaper! If you want friends/family aboard much, 30 feet is OK for 4 people overnight, or more on a daysail.
If by "Cheap" you mean a good deal... well ... it depends, you need to assess the particular boat. Some boats that need a lot of repairs and maintenance are priced about the same as those that dont. The simpler the boat is with less exterior wood, the easier...

tropicalescape 08-10-2011 10:19

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
I learned to sail on a hobie cat and then bought a 40 yawl then a 32 sloop..depends a lot on what you fill you can handle ..the small boat sounds good as others have said keep the job and protect your income in these bad eco.times

Hotel L 08-10-2011 12:47

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cheechako
I'm still getting stuck trying to figure out what is too much money. If we get a cheap boat, will it be less fun and a bigger headache? If we get an expensive one, will it be more fun and easier to get my loved ones on board?

This is a generalization, but cheap or expensive, the things that go wrong with boats are much the same: Pumps, engines, rigging, sails etc. come from the same sources. You need a good hull, but there's no reason a Catalina wont be just as easy to maintain as a hinkley... probably cheaper! If you want friends/family aboard much, 30 feet is OK for 4 people overnight, or more on a daysail.
If by "Cheap" you mean a good deal... well ... it depends, you need to assess the particular boat. Some boats that need a lot of repairs and maintenance are priced about the same as those that dont. The simpler the boat is with less exterior wood, the easier...

I only had 2 cents to give so I guess I mean inexpensive. :)

KEG 19-10-2011 19:02

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
My wife and I are in a similar position. Landlocked, good job, and looking at options. For months we argued about size because she wants a “roomy” boat. We finally came to agreement when I figured out that to her roomy means lots of storage space, not what I thought which was, swing a cat and not hit anything roomy. Having settled that, we decided that buying a 25 foot boat to learn on and have fun with while figuring out whether we actually like sailing is a good idea. We also decided that a boat that costs less than a good used car is within our throw away budget so if we lose our “investment” we’re not out much.

We also tossed around the trailering vs slip options and decided that the cost of fuel hauling a boat around for a season is about equal to the cost of a slip especially when maintenance on the tow vehicle and wear and tear on the boat is also factored in. The deciding factor for springing for a slip is the ease of getting on the water. That said, we decided to get a boat with a trailer so that we can hit the Great Lakes or other destination if we decide to.

We have also decided that owning another boat on a coast when the time comes is within our means but first we have to make darn sure that we like extended sailing before making that commitment. We can afford to throw away 10 grand but 150 grand on a whim isn’t in our books. I would jump at the latter but the economy isn’t good enough to guarantee a buyer will be there to buy my expensive mistake. Ten grand to learn and have fun for a few years is cheap entertainment even if the boat doesn’t leave the slip.

We recently found the boat we will probably buy, we just need to make the decision and run with it.

wizard1_us 20-10-2011 01:36

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
so, what boat are you thinking you will probably buy?

Me-and-Boo 20-10-2011 02:58

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by KEG (Post 800053)

We also tossed around the trailering vs slip options and decided that the cost of fuel hauling a boat around for a season is about equal to the cost of a slip especially when maintenance on the tow vehicle and wear and tear on the boat is also factored in. The deciding factor for springing for a slip is the ease of getting on the water. That said, we decided to get a boat with a trailer so that we can hit the Great Lakes or other destination if we decide to.

One option is to own a boat and keep her on the hard and when you are arriving have the marina put her in the water at a slip you take for a month or so.

hazle 20-10-2011 05:46

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
I caught the sailing bug when I realized gas was way to expensive to have fun on the lake anymore. I bought a albacore 15 dingy and learned a lot about what not to do. Now I have a 24 seafarer that I just bought labor day weekend. I am stuck for a while on Stockton Lake until the kids get through college.
The bigger boat is a lot easier to sail, I can go out and stay overnight and learn about some of the things that staying on a boat brings. My boat is older so there is maintenance that I will be learning about.

It has been years since I have been to Perry but I can tell you at Stockton with all the coves there are plenty of places to anchor and stay the weekend or week, you can get a lot of experience sailing and staying on the boat. I really don't want to give away all the secrets about this lake because I like it the way it is, but I will tell you I would drive 2hrs more if i had to to get there. there is not a lake in KS or MO that you have the freedoms Stockton brings! 25000 acres pretty much to myself is really not to bad. My Boat has a shorter mast so cruising under the bridges is not a problem for me when the water is a couple feet below normal. There are not to many sailboats that get to do the southern part of the lake like I do.
I have been practicing living the retired life for a few years now. i can tell you that I have seen people jump into something they have never done and few years later they are right back in the rat race because they really have not a clue what life out of the rat race is like.
I have a private dock on the lake "very rare" and there are about 12 more docks in our cove. They are all owned by people that thought they liked the lake life. There are really 2 or 3 of us that use the lake the rest of them just live a city life at the lake! :confused::banghead: Some of them may only use the lake 2 or 3 times a year! if that.

jannpage 20-10-2011 08:34

Re: Caught the Sailing Bug . . . in Kansas ! Now What ?
 
I agree with you idea of getting a smaller boat and leaving it in the water. Years ago I realiized my Venture 22 was sitting in the yard and not being used so I decided to rent a slip and see what happened. Suddenly we were using the boat nearly every weekend for the next several years. My only recomendation is to get something a little smaller. 15 ft or less. Learn to sail. Get you wife sailing. Find a local yacht club and try your best to get her with some of the gals that sail and get her sailing - independent of you. Have her take sailing lessons and get her sailing. YOu might even try getting her on a racing crew. Believe me it is important for both of you to try hard to get involved in sailing - really experienceing it not just armchair sailing. Get on the watger - independently. Nothing wrong with togetherness, but independent is perhaps more important. Good luck. You have made great progress so far in you thinking.

One more thing. unless you buy impulsively and pay way to much you can always sell and get most of your monely back. 90% is realistic on all but a new boat.

I am serious about trying to visit several local yacht clubs. Talk to the president and attend a few meetings. Some clubs are pretty snooty so try to find several and visit them all. Visit marinas on the weekend and talk to people. Visit as many as you can.

And do listen to Hazle. Points are well taken. I often say - old men need something to do - that they think is interesting and rewarding etc. So do old women.

Cheers

Cheers.

Hotel L 20-10-2011 10:00

Quote:

Originally Posted by KEG
My wife and I are in a similar position. Landlocked, good job, and looking at options. For months we argued about size because she wants a “roomy” boat. We finally came to agreement when I figured out that to her roomy means lots of storage space, not what I thought which was, swing a cat and not hit anything roomy. Having settled that, we decided that buying a 25 foot boat to learn on and have fun with while figuring out whether we actually like sailing is a good idea. We also decided that a boat that costs less than a good used car is within our throw away budget so if we lose our “investment” we’re not out much.

We also tossed around the trailering vs slip options and decided that the cost of fuel hauling a boat around for a season is about equal to the cost of a slip especially when maintenance on the tow vehicle and wear and tear on the boat is also factored in. The deciding factor for springing for a slip is the ease of getting on the water. That said, we decided to get a boat with a trailer so that we can hit the Great Lakes or other destination if we decide to.

We have also decided that owning another boat on a coast when the time comes is within our means but first we have to make darn sure that we like extended sailing before making that commitment. We can afford to throw away 10 grand but 150 grand on a whim isn’t in our books. I would jump at the latter but the economy isn’t good enough to guarantee a buyer will be there to buy my expensive mistake. Ten grand to learn and have fun for a few years is cheap entertainment even if the boat doesn’t leave the slip.

We recently found the boat we will probably buy, we just need to make the decision and run with it.

Consider a SailTime (like) option...the best of both worlds. We went through the same decision cycle. We were concerned a 25 foot boat would be more like camping and may distract from enjoying the boat every weekend. SailTime allowed us to invest very little on a late model larger boat, all maintenance ext was taken care of and we just focused o n learning and enjoying.


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