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-   -   Attaching Two Lengths of Chain ? (https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f118/attaching-two-lengths-of-chain-39031.html)

CAELESTIS 09-04-2010 16:03

Attaching Two Lengths of Chain ?
 
I have two completely separate chain and nylon rodes. I would like to add 75' of 3/8 HT to one of them (currently 50' chain, 270 nylon).

Is there a foolproof way to do this, and not have it be the "weak link"? It would need to work in my windlass.

Thanks.

barnakiel 09-04-2010 17:54

A link will work on the windlass but is less strong than chain.

b.

hugosalt 10-04-2010 06:43

I know some have welded hammer links in/some weld stainless steel links...I would not.

surfmachine 10-04-2010 06:47

I joined my with one of those split links that you hammer together, works great through the gypsy, 10mm, but it is getting a bit rusty, I will treat it with rust eater and cold galvanising, and keep an eye on it, very easy to replace!
Keith.

Hudson Force 10-04-2010 07:38

Quote:

Originally Posted by surfmachine (Post 434820)
I joined my with one of those split links that you hammer together, works great through the gypsy, 10mm, but it is getting a bit rusty, I will treat it with rust eater and cold galvanising, and keep an eye on it, very easy to replace!
Keith.

I have been doing the same as Keith posted above, but I also found that the links were of poorer quality than my chain. I now attach shots of chain with high grade US shackles that function with a mild "hiccup" over my windlass gypsy. The Asian, mostly Chinese, metals that flood the market at half the expense don't seem to perform as well and stainless is pretty, but not of the same strength as galvanized. 'take care and joy, Aythya crew

MarkJ 10-04-2010 08:03

Yeah, we have one stainless steel you bash together at the 50 meter mark. It goes through the gypsie fine. In stronger winds we stop just past the link and cover it with a bit of chain shackeled either side of the join, just as a safety. We sleep better at night :)


Mark

Blue Stocking 10-04-2010 09:53

Quote:

Originally Posted by MarkJ (Post 434845)
Yeah, we have one stainless steel you bash together at the 50 meter mark. It goes through the gypsie fine. In stronger winds we stop just past the link and cover it with a bit of chain shackeled either side of the join, just as a safety. We sleep better at night :)


Mark

Mark,

Every now and then you read something----and a light comes on :D:
Reading your safety comment above clued me in on something I saw on a boat a while back.
The chain was fitted with a piece of steel channel spanning the joining link, with a bolt with nut and washer thru each link on either side, and thru the channel.
It came over the bow roller with caution, and was quickly removed before getting to the gypsy. Neat :thumb:

delmarrey 10-04-2010 10:04

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blue Stocking (Post 434885)
Mark,

Every now and then you read something----and a light comes on :D:
Reading your safety comment above clued me in on something I saw on a boat a while back.
The chain was fitted with a piece of steel channel spanning the joining link, with a bolt with nut and washer thru each link on either side, and thru the channel.
It came over the bow roller with caution, and was quickly removed before getting to the gypsy. Neat :thumb:

How quick is quickly, same as the length of a piece of string?
Sounds like a lot of trouble to me!

When the wind is blowing and the current flowing, time is essential. :(

Blue Stocking 10-04-2010 10:16

Del,

Everything, in it's time and place

I would think with the chain on the bottom, wind blowing and current flowing, he slept better knowing the channel wasn't chafing away. :D:

Jim Cate 10-04-2010 15:13

G'Day all,

Well, we've used the "hammer together" type joining links for many years, and so far have not had any issues. The ones that West Marine sold had a higher rating than BBB chain, but the s/s ones sold here in Oz are undoubtedly Chinese in origin and have no marked rating. When one regalvanizes the chain, the joining links stop being rusty!

Some chain vendors can do welded joining links, but we've not had any experience with them. Obviously one is better off with one continuous length of chain, but fiscal realities have led us to using the joiners. The high test joining shackles mentioned above look great, but I doubt if they would work going through our Maxwell 1500VWC windlass... the chain pipe just barely passes our short-link 10 mm chain without such lumps to deal with!

Cheers,

Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II lying Lake Macquarie NSW Oz

Highlander40 10-04-2010 16:28

Save a buck, loose the boat?
 
Unless the two pieces of chain are new.. start with one new piece.

If you have to do it, the link should be welded and the same strength as the chain.

CAELESTIS 10-04-2010 16:48

Sounds like I need to buy yet another chain/rode.

Thank you all for the guidance.

barnakiel 10-04-2010 16:55

The split link is a poor choice (for strength) and MarkJ's solution is nice.

Hence a question to MarkJ - do you happen to remember what size shackles do you use for this? Asking because in my 10 mm (approx 3/8) chain I can only use a 12 mm shackle at the end link - I cannot push the pin in the middle of the chain! So I would have to go with a 10 mm shackle (probably an expensive Wichard to make up for the loss in size).

barnie

Hudson Force 10-04-2010 17:40

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Cate (Post 435026)
G'Day all,

....... The high test joining shackles mentioned above look great, but I doubt if they would work going through our Maxwell 1500VWC windlass... the chain pipe just barely passes our short-link 10 mm chain without such lumps to deal with!

Cheers,

Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II lying Lake Macquarie NSW Oz

'point well advised,- my earlier mention of the use of these shackles was with my manual Simpson-Lawrence that can accomodate the passage of the shackles over an open gypsy with my manual presence and timing. Another case of compromise with technology. 'take care and joy, Aythya crew

Jim Cate 10-04-2010 18:02

Quote:

Originally Posted by barnakiel (Post 435052)
The split link is a poor choice (for strength) and MarkJ's solution is nice.

barnie

G'Day All,

Well, I've seen/heard this sort of statement for years, and have never heard first hand of anyone's chain breaking at one of the joins. Further, if one looks at the West Marine catalog (only reference material I have on board) the SWL for 3/8"BBB chain is 2650 lbs, and the SWL for their brand of connecting link is 2750 lbs. So, please explain to me why I should be afraid of using them? And can anyone refer me to a verified instance of one breaking in the cruising arena?

Cheers,

Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II lying Lake Macquarie, NSW Oz


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