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-   -   Fishing for Extra Money? (https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f67/fishing-for-extra-money-33725.html)

joburnet 03-12-2009 12:16

Fishing for Extra Money?
 
Anyone ever tried this? A 100lb fish should be worth $300ish to a local restaurant. Catch a few a month and that could be a significant source of income.

Vasco 03-12-2009 12:27

All the cruisers I know share with others if they get a big one and have more than they can fit in the fridge or want.

Excalibur5 03-12-2009 13:15

Bad idea from a legal standpoint. That would be commercial fishing, not sport, which requires all sorts of licenses, none of which are cheap. For example a Alaska salmon hand troll license costs around $11,000 currently. Then your boat becomes a commercial fishing vessel, which puts you into a whole new class of regulations for safety gear, etc.

Not even close to worth it. If you were caught, the fines could be huge.

scubasteve 03-12-2009 14:22

Quote:

Originally Posted by Excalibur5 (Post 368802)
Bad idea from a legal standpoint. That would be commercial fishing, not sport, which requires all sorts of licenses, none of which are cheap. For example a Alaska salmon hand troll license costs around $11,000 currently. Then your boat becomes a commercial fishing vessel, which puts you into a whole new class of regulations for safety gear, etc.

Not even close to worth it. If you were caught, the fines could be huge.

Right on, not worth the trouble or expense.

joburnet 03-12-2009 15:28

Nuts.

GordMay 04-12-2009 07:39

Quote:

Originally Posted by Excalibur5 (Post 368802)
Bad idea from a legal standpoint. That would be commercial fishing, not sport, which requires all sorts of licenses, none of which are cheap...
Not even close to worth it. If you were caught, the fines could be huge.

INDEED.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Vasco (Post 368788)
All the cruisers I know share with others if they get a big one and have more than they can fit in the fridge or want.

INDEED - or share with locals.

Blue Stocking 04-12-2009 07:54

On his run South, if he stops in Bermuda and gets caught doing this, it could lead to confiscation of the boat, and if found guilty, deportation ,at the least, and the lock-up at the worst.
It was this sort of illegal income-earning activity, that led to the bothersome policy now in place of having to apply for 21 day extensions of stay.

denverd0n 04-12-2009 08:41

Not to mention that in most places where a cruiser is going to go, there are a lot of locals who depend on fishing to feed their families. These locals are going to be VERY quick to report you to the authorities if they think you are encroaching on their profession!

thinwater 04-12-2009 09:23

Local regulations abound, plus the Federal regs.
 
For example:
Maryland Commercial Fishing Licenses

As every poster has pointed out, this is quite impractical. Just catch what you need. Even for a recreational fisherman it can be VERY dificult to stay legal as you pass through multiple areas, even within the US, as more and more states are regulating both tidal AND ocean fishing. I really would like to see the government clean this up, but I have realistic expectations. Which is to say I expect more trouble in the future.

The best I have ever done is to recieve fresh vegatables in exchange, which really is quite a good deal. Whenever offered fish by another sailor, I always reciprocate with something else fresh. This is both friendly and economical.

witzgall 04-12-2009 09:50

I read an online story of a couple that bought a Ferro boat in the 1970's, got a commercial license, and fished legally that way. I recall part of the story where a "real" commercial fisherman stated that he made less money, because his overhead and personal expenses were much higher - maintaining a house, boat, kids, etc.

Tellie 04-12-2009 10:00

The time it takes to hunt down 100 pounders in a slow sailboat would make it too time consuming. Then there's the storage problems and getting it to market fast enough. Not practical even if all the regulations were met.

David M 04-12-2009 11:30

In most all foreign countries, don't even think about competing with the locals. In fact, buy their fish and make some friends. :)

barnakiel 04-12-2009 18:06

Depends on the place. Some countries do not accept sailors/cruisers to fish for income. This is licensed to local fishermen. Also the price you gave is perhaps in food eqivalent but not what the supplier gets. A 100lb tuna here fetches 75USD at the door.

b.

Chief Engineer 04-12-2009 21:44

It is a good way to get "sunk".

Why anyone would consider encroaching on anothers livelihood is beyond me.

betachz 14-01-2010 11:35

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chief Engineer (Post 369473)
It is a good way to get "sunk".

Why anyone would consider encroaching on anothers livelihood is beyond me.


LOL... heard of friendly compitition? It's the American way :) He was simply asking if there was a way to make some money along the way. I understand you appreciate the locals, we all do, but if there was a way to make money off the sea you sail over, how nice would that be? VERY!


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