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-   -   Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land? (https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f55/can-most-work-be-done-while-docked-or-do-you-bring-it-on-land-237767.html)

TheNomadicAspie 30-07-2020 13:17

Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?
 
I don't own a sailboat yet, but am planning on buying one soon.

I know the answers depends on a lot, but if I buy a 10k or so sailboat that is seaworthy but may need a lot of stuff repaired, will I need to have it brought on land to do a lot of repairwork, or is a lot of stuff done while in the water?

I imagine when cutting wood and working with fiberglass that it may not be possible to get stuff done with the boat rocking. Is it standard practice to bring it on land? I'm trying to figure out if I buy a boat should I have it brought to a boat yard to work on it, or could I have it dropped into the water to live on while figuring out how to fix stuff?

Or is the answer both and is it common to bring a boat in and out of the water as various stuff is done, which I assume would get expensive?

I know my question is really vague, just trying to get an idea of what I should expect as I learn more?

boatman61 30-07-2020 13:31

Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?
 
Most work can be done afloat except for serious hull repairs and everything under the waterline.

TheNomadicAspie 30-07-2020 13:33

Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?
 
Thank you for the answer, I appreciate it.

IslandInfedel 30-07-2020 13:35

Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by boatman61 (Post 3197864)
Most work can be done afloat except for serious hull repairs and everything under the waterline.

I agree with this

capt jgw 30-07-2020 13:47

Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?
 
Right. Only underwater work requires hauling. But major above water work done in a marina will surely p***s off your neighbors and probably be against marina rules. Think about how you're going to run a tablesaw on the boat if any of the work would require that. You can do it, but you have to be careful about where you do it. And many boatyards these days don't allow DIY work for some or all tasks even when hauled out. So doing the work on you're own property next to your workshop would be the easiest, but real expensive getting the boat there.

mvweebles 30-07-2020 13:58

Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?
 
I agree with capt jgw in previous post. Marinas and yards are getting more cautious about what work they allow. Some work isn't practical in a slip not because the boat isn't stable (it's fine) but because of other considerations. You can re-rig a mast by replacing one shroud at a time, but if you want to drop the mast to rebuild or paint, you'll probably need a yard. Drilling and spot repairs, roll/brush painting are generally fine, large area sanding, grinding, and spraying are not. Cutting large sheets of plywood is difficult.

And then there is the marina. I've spent a lot of time in basic marinas. Fancy ones will be more strict. When your neighbors are paying $500-$1000 per month for a slip, they lose their sense of humor for repairs.

Good luck

Peter

Tillsbury 30-07-2020 14:15

Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?
 
Our marina specifically states that sanding is not allowed in the agreement. Now, lots of people do sanding but the point is that if it gets ridiculous and annoying then the marina can tell you to stop. The guy opposite spent several days with an air-hammer removing paint and rust from his steel tank, which got close to annoying.

However, when the guy next door who happens to be the port CEO starts spray painting his boat it is time to jump up and down a bit.

PatMc57 30-07-2020 14:25

Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?
 
I keep my boat in an older, quiet, marina that has a number of liveaboards. I keep my intrusive repairs to a minimum, but everyone does minor repairs and upkeep on the boats. It's part of owning a boat. When I haul out, however, I take it to a "working" yacht yard that allows me to work on it, including bottom sanding..tented. There is no pool and only a porta potty for the workers. I'm surrounded by commercial fisherman. The yard allows your own repairs and is cheap on the winter storage and let's me sleep onboard using their electric for a heater [January in the North].
I feel that this is the ultimate good arrangement

gonesail 30-07-2020 14:43

Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?
 
I find that the more work you can remove from the boat and do in a workshop setting the better. I have done sawing and sanding on picnic tables or areas of the dock where it is allowed. I have replaced fuel tanks and propane ranges at the slip while living aboard. Anything within reason is possible. But many marinas will not accept boats that are not already in good working condition :rolleyes:

Jammer 30-07-2020 15:11

Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by TheNomadicAspie (Post 3197847)
Or is the answer both and is it common to bring a boat in and out of the water as various stuff is done, which I assume would get expensive?


It depends very much on the circumstances. The boat, the location, the nature of the work, time of year, and so on.


I'm in Minnesota and cruise locally. Our season runs roughly from May 1 - September 30. Generally, boats are hauled out in October and launched in April or May. Most people drop the mast before hauling although there are a few that leave it up while the boat is on a cradle or trailer.



As a rule I try to keep in-season maintenance to a minimum (I'd rather be sailing) and do most of the work on the boat in March and April. My boat sits on a trailer in the winter and I just trailer it back to my house and work on it there. People who keep the boat on stands or a cradle have less flexibility and have to drive to the marina or boatyard, and then there are rules on what you can and cannot do.


I've switched entirely over to battery tools which provides some flexibility I didn't have before, but it's still awkward to try to do much aboard especially if you're trying to use the boat or live on it at the same time. Maybe it's different with much larger craft. This spring I replaced portlights, for example, which was a messy job that required good access to the outside of the hull that would have been hard to achieve at the dock. Similarly for lifeline stanchions and pulpit/sternrail, hard to get good access at the proper angle in most slips but easy with a stepladder.


Things like electrical work and running rigging are perhaps just as easy while aboard.

SV__Grace 31-07-2020 08:17

Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?
 
Marinas don't like the clutter and noise of using their dock as a workshop, but I've never had a problem working my boat, cutting something on the dock, cleaning up and getting back to working on the boat.

Working at anchor you can do anything you want! While it might be convenient to have a dock, you can do just about anything at anchor with a bit of creativity.

MJH 31-07-2020 08:37

Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by TheNomadicAspie (Post 3197847)
I don't own a sailboat yet, but am planning on buying one soon.

I know the answers depends on a lot, but if I buy a 10k or so sailboat that is seaworthy but may need a lot of stuff repaired, will I need to have it brought on land to do a lot of repairwork, or is a lot of stuff done while in the water?

I imagine when cutting wood and working with fiberglass that it may not be possible to get stuff done with the boat rocking. Is it standard practice to bring it on land? I'm trying to figure out if I buy a boat should I have it brought to a boat yard to work on it, or could I have it dropped into the water to live on while figuring out how to fix stuff?

Or is the answer both and is it common to bring a boat in and out of the water as various stuff is done, which I assume would get expensive?

I know my question is really vague, just trying to get an idea of what I should expect as I learn more?

Your correct...it all depends on where you are at, what you are doing, and of course the weather. Before you buy check with the marina to learn what they allow...get a copy of their Best Practices or Rules/Policies if you can rather than trust dock-talk.

However, sometimes you can just get a lot more done if the boat is just out of the water and resources are available that otherwise are not.

~ ~ _/) ~ ~ MJH

TrentePieds 31-07-2020 08:57

Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?
 
GRP ("frozen snot") hulls very rarely require repairs under the water line. If and when they do, you haul 'em. Most of what you will have to do in a $10K boat will be interior work, or it will be rigging work. Ask us questions about specific jobs you wish to do, and we can give you specific answers on how to do it.

For repairs/rebuilds of interior joiner work, sacrifice your dinette table or make a dedicated "work bench" that ships in its place. The materials you will require for interior joiner work will be light enuff and of small enuff dimensions that you can handle them on a dinette-sized bench. If you buy 4x8 foot sheet goods, then give your supplier a "cutting pattern" that permits him to cut the sheet down to pieces that you can get through your hatchway. Modern "cordless" tools make it perfectly feasible to rebuild your cabin furniture while you are actually in residence in the cabin :-)!

If you have a lot of work to do and you need a plenitood of tools to do it, e.g. a drill press or a "contractors saw", you are gonna find that the boat won't have sufficient storage capacity. The remedy for that is to buy a cheapie van that you can use for a tool crib and leave, upon getting permission to do so, in the marina's parking lot.

Check you moorage contract for clauses relating to work being done while in your slip. Most contracts forbid it for good and sufficient (CYA) reasons. Stay on the good side of the marina management. The contract will have given them power to stop you "in mid stroke", and possibly even to confiscate the boat.

Good luck :-)

TrentePieds

OS2Dude 31-07-2020 09:07

Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?
 
Read your contract or ask the marina manager about it. Our marina does not mind you working on your boat if it is something that can be done in a day. They don't allow anything that can damage another boat or their docks. I've done several projects with our boat at the slip. (Electrical re-wire, A/C installation, Head replacement, water line replacement, galley counter resurfacing, waxing, oiling the teak, rebedding windows, fiber glassing, etc.) Don't make a mess, clean up after yourself at the end of every day, and don't junk up the docks and they will likely not ever comment about it. Do be aware that others may be at the dock also, and keep the noise to a minimum, especially as the day begins to end.

vpbarkley 31-07-2020 09:08

Re: Can most work be done while docked or do you bring it on land?
 
Some underwater work can be performed by a diver. Our diver can change a prop and cutlass bearing in addition to the more common work like replacing zincs and cleaning inlets.

Something like replacing through hull fittings always requires hauling.


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