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Carltonboyce 15-12-2019 15:37

First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Hi,

Longtime lurker and newbie sailor.

I'm looking to buy my first, and possibly only, sailboat. I'm drawn to the classic looks and over-engineering of the Bristol Channel Cutter 28 and Nor'sea 27. I've read 20 affordable sailboats and 20 small boats, which is where the idea for a BCC comes from.

Looking to live on it for the next few years; only me at the moment but it would be nice to have space for someone else because who knows what the future might bring?

Initially for sailing around Europe but sailing to America would be a helluva achievement so blue water capability is important. Budget is £50,000.

Has anyone got any alternative suggestions please?

Thanks!

thomm225 15-12-2019 15:47

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
:popcorn:

hpeer 15-12-2019 16:08

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
We have a 44’er and a 33’er, 16,000 lbs. The 44 is spacious and the 33 is adequate for 2. We have lived aboard for 6 months and did OK. But we knew it was a trip and would end. For a couple to live aboard a much smaller boat for a long term would be exceptional.

The bigger boat (33) would work better for a crossing as well. Smaller is OK, bigger is better.

But I believe you have an adequate budget, for purchase. For fit out and customization you would need at least half as much again. So say to be optimistic, £35,000 purchase and £15,000 to finish.

My 2Ę.

thomm225 15-12-2019 16:15

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Or you can pick a different boat and do the cruising thing for maybe $10,000 or much less like these guys did.

There's always a way.

You can spend as little as $4,000 or as much as $300,000 or more and accomplish the same thing.

https://towndock.net/shippingnews/se...-and-alexandra

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYOuJP0VagA

sailorboy1 15-12-2019 16:23

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Sorry but i feel this is just a crazy thread question

Really people don't ask about boats to do things like for a couple to live aboard, cross oceans, blue water etc etc etc with no experience etc etc etc etc. All you are going get are people to feed your book reading dreams or others that will try to help that you that wouldn't accept.

Speed yourself down the xxxxxx path by at least spending some time using the search feature for the 100s-1000s of similar thread starts. I bet i can write half the responses that will follow on this thread.

boatman61 15-12-2019 16:55

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
I would suggest something a tad larger than 27ft for what you are thinking of doing whether solo or with one other..
Something like a Rival 32 or Nicholson 32.. the extra storage space and tankage is a must in my view, plus the extra knot in average speeds.. so is the headroom.
27ft is fine for a couple of weeks at a time but it gets old quick then its try to find a buyer for it and start boat hunting again.

GordMay 15-12-2019 16:57

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Greetings and welcome aboard the CF, Carlton.

Carltonboyce 15-12-2019 18:39

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by sailorboy1 (Post 3036963)
Sorry but i feel this is just a crazy thread question

Really people don't ask about boats to do things like for a couple to live aboard, cross oceans, blue water etc etc etc with no experience etc etc etc etc. All you are going get are people to feed your book reading dreams or others that will try to help that you that wouldn't accept.

Speed yourself down the xxxxxx path by at least spending some time using the search feature for the 100s-1000s of similar thread starts. I bet i can write half the responses that will follow on this thread.

Sorry I seem to have struck a nerve with you. It's been a 30 year dream to learn to sail, and I've started taking formal courses but that only takes you so far.

I've spent hundreds of hours on here and elsewhere researching and have narrowed it down to those two but thought I'd seek advice before taking the plunge. I'm well aware of my novice status, which is why I'm looking for a seaworthy boat I can live on and gain experience before venturing into blue water.

But, again, I'm sorry my willingness to seek help and admit to my inexperience has caused you do much angst...

Carltonboyce 15-12-2019 18:44

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Thanks for your suggestions everyone - and for the warm welcome!

sanibel sailor 15-12-2019 19:10

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
BCC is a great boat, big for length, but quite expensive.
Additionally, when fitting out you may find yourself limited when looking for fittings that are "appropriate" to her pedigree and style. Think bronze rather than common stainless.

boatman61 15-12-2019 19:10

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Some examples.. leaves cash for upgrades like liferaft, solar/wind gen, AIS Transceiver etc..
Nicholsons are long keel encapsulated and the Rivals long fin, also encapsulated in grp.

https://m.apolloduck.com/boat/nicholson-32/626065

https://m.apolloduck.com/boat/nicholson-31/625811

https://m.apolloduck.com/boat/rival-32/621919

Carltonboyce 15-12-2019 19:15

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Carltonboyce (Post 3036931)
Hi,

Longtime lurker and newbie sailor.

I'm looking to buy my first, and possibly only, sailboat. I'm drawn to the classic looks and over-engineering of the Bristol Channel Cutter 28 and Nor'sea 27. I've read 20 affordable sailboats and 20 small boats, which is where the idea for a BCC comes from.

Looking to live on it for the next few years; only me at the moment but it would be nice to have space for someone else because who knows what the future might bring?

Initially for sailing around Europe but sailing to America would be a helluva achievement so blue water capability is important. Budget is £50,000.

Has anyone got any alternative suggestions please?

Thanks!

Quote:

Originally Posted by boatman61 (Post 3037061)
Some examples.. leaves cash for upgrades like liferaft, solar/wind gen, AIS Transceiver etc..
Nicholsons are long keel encapsulated and the Rivals long fin, also encapsulated in grp.

https://m.apolloduck.com/boat/nicholson-32/626065

https://m.apolloduck.com/boat/nicholson-31/625811

https://m.apolloduck.com/boat/rival-32/621919

Thanks for the suggestions - much appreciated!

sailorboy1 15-12-2019 19:16

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Carltonboyce (Post 3037034)
Sorry I seem to have struck a nerve with you.

I've spent hundreds of hours on here and elsewhere researching and have narrowed it down to those two but thought I'd seek advice before taking the plunge. I'm well aware of my novice status, which is why I'm looking for a seaworthy boat I can live on and gain experience before venturing into blue water.

.

Didn't hit any nerve with me. But if you have spent all that time here and still posted you initial question, well.......... you must have read the answer lots of times already

What you really are asking for is to get a boat 30 tears out of date because you read it in a book from the 80s.

Its ok with me

Carltonboyce 15-12-2019 19:23

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by sailorboy1 (Post 3037066)
Didn't hit any nerve with me. But if you have spent all that time here and still posted you initial question, well.......... you must have read the answer lots of times already

What you really are asking for is to get a boat 30 tears out of date because you read it in a book from the 80s.

Its ok with me


You must spend hours lurking on here waiting to post snarky comments. Sadly, it seems that even forums for grown-ups like this one attracts insecure, anonymous trolls.

I'll ignore any further replies from you and focus on replying to folk who are willing to help a newbie rather than ridicule them.

jeanathon 15-12-2019 19:39

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Carlton,
I used the ignore button on him a long time ago. Much more relaxing. I agree with other posters about size and tankage, but i/we are not you. Some people like tiny homes. I like the idea, but know it won't work for me. Any way you could spend time on one before buying?

gamayun 15-12-2019 19:46

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Carltonboyce (Post 3036931)
Looking to live on it for the next few years; only me at the moment but it would be nice to have space for someone else because who knows what the future might bring?

Welcome, Carlton! We love em, but please, please don't feed our trolls ;) I bought my boat with both a realistic present and a potential future in mind. It's not easy because there are compromises in all things, but if you buy a boat you love to sail, then everything else just seems to fall into place. That's all the philosophy I got for ya because I actually don't know a thing about your boat choices, although it seems you're getting good input anyway.

JPA Cate 15-12-2019 20:29

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Better you should buy what you can find now, and start using it. It's really a more discreet way to go about what you want to do. If you find out by doing that cruising isn't for you, it is far better to have learned it on a small cash output. If you learn on a small boat that you love all of *it*, then, with some sea miles under your keel, and having begun to learn seamanship, rather than just how to sail, you might want a change, anyway. Life is full of changes, but then you'd have some of your own experience to base your choices on, and then, they'd suit you better than whatever someone unknown to you from the internet suggests.

Boatman 61 and atoll are two CF members who are familiar with the boats to be found around Britain. Some of the Americans have their eyes on that market, and there are many, many boats for sale in the States.

All boats are compromises. For a first boat, choose the smallest, sturdiest one you think you'd like, and then, move up only when it becomes too small, or you want a "real cutter", or whatever your next change/choice turns out to be. The chances of choosing a "rest of your life" boat for your first boat are very slim, unless you are short lived, and we expect you to be long lived.

Ann

Island Time O25 15-12-2019 23:12

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
My first boat was a 27 footer and I could probably live on it if I had to (by myself, really too small for a modern couple). My current boat is 36' and can comfortably (my definition of comfort) accomodate a couple provided they are not pack rats or fashinistas with tons of clothes. For others nothing less thenn 45-50' will do.

As far as dreaming etc. - at some point you have to stop dreaming and make the plunge. Be it relocating to a sail friendly area or changing to a job which will easier accomodate your sailing goals, etc. To just dream without any meaningful follow up is not very conducive to actually sailing your own boat.

Sojourner 16-12-2019 00:44

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by sailorboy1 (Post 3036963)
Sorry but i feel this is just a crazy thread question

Really people don't ask about boats to do things like for a couple to live aboard, cross oceans, blue water etc etc etc with no experience etc etc etc etc. All you are going get are people to feed your book reading dreams or others that will try to help that you that wouldn't accept.

So true! And I say that as a very guilty one of having too much caffeine and banging away at them like Tommy Lee on (more) crack. It's like asking the waiter "what's good?" Everyone does it, but how the h#ll can anyone answer or take the answer seriously?

Hey guys, what's my favorite color? Anyone know the best country? I need recommendations on the most suitable size of shoe.... :banghead::facepalm:

thomm225 16-12-2019 04:37

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Those two boats you mentioned are indeed classics, but there are a few problems with them (as with all boats)

First they are quite expensive for what you get. I'm thinking their performance will be much like any other older full keel boat of similar size.

The Bristol Channel Cutter is a 28' boat but about 38' LOA so you will get to pay for the extra 10' at your marina not to mention possibly extra trouble docking if single handing and new to parking sailboats

The Nor' Sea 27 is a pretty neat boat also but way overpriced. There's one across from me at my marina that is in the process of being "refit" for the past 10 years or so. I've checked it out lots of times

Here's a complete list of many more classic boats including the two you already like plus some good advice for the first time buyer. And btw, the guy that assembled the list and built the website has circumnavigated twice on his 28' Pearson Triton

https://atomvoyages.com/planning/goo...oats-list.html

An experienced young couple near here bought a Great Dane 28 recently for next to nothing and it has some pretty good numbers as far as seaworthiness also on the list above

Carltonboyce 16-12-2019 05:02

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by jeanathon (Post 3037075)
Carlton,
I used the ignore button on him a long time ago. Much more relaxing. I agree with other posters about size and tankage, but i/we are not you. Some people like tiny homes. I like the idea, but know it won't work for me. Any way you could spend time on one before buying?

Good idea, thanks!

And yes, I've spend a lot of time in small wilderness cabins and caravans lately and don't mind tiny homes but appreciate that bigger might be better in the long-term!

Carltonboyce 16-12-2019 05:07

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Island Time O25 (Post 3037157)
My first boat was a 27 footer and I could probably live on it if I had to (by myself, really too small for a modern couple). My current boat is 36' and can comfortably (my definition of comfort) accomodate a couple provided they are not pack rats or fashinistas with tons of clothes. For others nothing less thenn 45-50' will do.

As far as dreaming etc. - at some point you have to stop dreaming and make the plunge. Be it relocating to a sail friendly area or changing to a job which will easier accomodate your sailing goals, etc. To just dream without any meaningful follow up is not very conducive to actually sailing your own boat.

Well, I'm recently divorced (my ex-wife hated boats and sailing...) semi-retired and just sold my house, so the time for doing rather than dreaming is upon me, hence the request for help!

Carltonboyce 16-12-2019 05:09

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by thomm225 (Post 3037237)
Those two boats you mentioned are indeed classics, but there are a few problems with them (as with all boats)

First they are quite expensive for what you get. I'm thinking their performance will be much like any other older full keel boat of similar size.

The Bristol Channel Cutter is a 28' boat but about 38' LOA so you will get to pay for the extra 10' at your marina not to mention possibly extra trouble docking if single handing and new to parking sailboats

The Nor' Sea 27 is a pretty neat boat also but way overpriced. There's one across from me at my marina that is in the process of being "refit" for the past 10 years or so. I've checked it out lots of times

Here's a complete list of many more classic boats including the two you already like plus some good advice for the first time buyer. And btw, the guy that assembled the list and built the website has circumnavigated twice on his 28' Pearson Triton

https://atomvoyages.com/planning/goo...oats-list.html

An experienced young couple near here bought a Great Dane 28 recently for next to nothing and it has some pretty good numbers as far as seaworthiness also on the list above

That's all really helpful, thank you!

thomm225 16-12-2019 05:14

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Carltonboyce (Post 3037261)
That's all really helpful, thank you!

And I almost forgot the Twister 28 and the Contessa 32.

https://sailboatdata.com/sailboat/twister-28

https://sailboatdata.com/sailboat/contessa-32

Plus a few others.

https://www.mahina.com/cruise.html

sanibel sailor 16-12-2019 05:32

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
It probably makes sense to see what's available where you are. Many websites tend to be US-centric (sorry, we can't help ourselves) and ignore most older British/European makes. Greater selection generally makes for a better purchase. On the other hand, there was a study that said after a certain point, that more choices leads to less satisfaction, so narrowing it down early can be helpful.

LLCoolDave 16-12-2019 06:01

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
We are all impressionable. Especially when we first start sailing. What I'm saying is get some experience and you'll eventually find your own taste in boats and not what a book tells you.

jeanathon 16-12-2019 06:42

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Sojourner (Post 3037177)
So true! And I say that as a very guilty one of having too much caffeine and banging away at them like Tommy Lee on (more) crack. It's like asking the waiter "what's good?" Everyone does it, but how the h#ll can anyone answer or take the answer seriously?

Hey guys, what's my favorite color? Anyone know the best country? I need recommendations on the most suitable size of shoe.... :banghead::facepalm:

Soujourner,
ņ waiter probably eats at his restaurant every work day hence is the perfect person to ask what is good and what isn't. As far as you're other analogies, have some more coffee.
By quoting boy1 you bypassed my ignore button on him. If that continues I will be forced to ignore you as well.
My apologies to everyone for thread drift.
Carlton, You mentioned recently divorced. I bought my 30 loa, but 22' at the waterline with the intent of soloing and never ever getting married again. By the time I had refurbished her and splashed her again I had married a young adventurous woman. I love that boat, but it is just too small for two.
We cannot know the future, but we can plan in enough flexibility to deal with it.

sailorboy1 16-12-2019 07:15

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
the best thing about this thread is that I learned I'm ignored by some people on my ignore list :thumb:

To the OP I hope you get a boat YOU like! I know I let this place influence me on what boat to get and didn't get the one at first I wanted (and I never ask the "what boat for me" question). That was an expensive lesson.

When you are looking at old boats the name/brand etc. is of little use compared to what condition the boat is in NOW.

thomm225 16-12-2019 07:40

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by LLCoolDave (Post 3037287)
We are all impressionable. Especially when we first start sailing. What I'm saying is get some experience and you'll eventually find your own taste in boats and not what a book tells you.

Could be that a combination of your experiences plus what you read in books and the opinions of others with experience can all contribute to a good boat choice.

There's simply so much to consider when it comes to boat selection that it's hard to gain that much experience especially for a first time buyer

Other sources of information are almost essential to making a good choice even after you decide what type sailboat you want.

Pete7 16-12-2019 08:20

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by boatman61 (Post 3037061)
Some examples.. leaves cash for upgrades like liferaft, solar/wind gen, AIS Transceiver etc..
Nicholsons are long keel encapsulated and the Rivals long fin, also encapsulated in grp.

https://m.apolloduck.com/boat/nicholson-32/626065

https://m.apolloduck.com/boat/nicholson-31/625811

https://m.apolloduck.com/boat/rival-32/621919

I agree with Phil, some great boats about in the 30 -35 ft range for half your budget which will allow funds for some really good quality sails etc.

Dockhead on here said something interesting to me a while ago over a G&T, a decent sized shower is important if you want to live aboard. After all it is going to be your permanent home, so space and layout important.

If you look at say a Contessa 32 you will see the heads area is between the main cabin and v berths which gives lots of space. The Primose early Moody 33-36ft yachts are similar with great space for a live aboard. The Contessa is also very pretty yacht with that look back factor as you row away, just a bit small inside.

However, if you plans may include a significant other half in the future, then I would choose one of the more modern European yachts which will likely be much more attractive to the fairer sex.

Pete

Carltonboyce 16-12-2019 08:32

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Glad to hear things worked out so well for you! I'm in a similar frame of mind at the moment as you were, but never say never, eh?!

boatman61 16-12-2019 08:36

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by jeanathon (Post 3037313)
Soujourner,
ņ waiter probably eats at his restaurant every work day hence is the perfect person to ask what is good and what isn't.

Damn.. Obviously worked the wrong Hotels and Restaurants during my time in catering.. no way did we get stuff off the menu..
Egg and chips with beans or sausage maybe.. 😁

Pete7 16-12-2019 08:43

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
1 Attachment(s)
Oh sod it, just blow the budget and buy this, gorgeous:

https://www.devalk.nl/en/yachtbroker...NAJAD-343.html

Shrew 16-12-2019 08:50

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Carltonboyce (Post 3036931)

I'm looking to buy my first, and possibly only, sailboat. .... Bristol Channel Cutter 28 and Nor'sea 27.

Looking to live on it for the next few years......would be nice to have space for someone else

.......sailing to America ....... blue water capability is important.

With these goals, this will be your last boat, if you sell it and move back to land. Trust me, once you get a significant other, live aboard for any length of time or start making long passages, you will be looking to move up.

Just spend a few hours on the countless You Tube Forums. Most start with boats in the mid to upper 30's and they all eventually start looking to upgrade.

One sure way to ensure this isn't your last boat, is to buy a boat too small to do what you want to do comfortably.

YachtBroker 16-12-2019 09:31

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Have a look at Pacific Seacraft Dana 24 and the 27' model. Both very seaworthy boats. Might be hard to find overseas, though.

Paul Kelly 16-12-2019 10:19

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Hi Carlton

Iíve been sailing for 40 years, but only properly graduated to cruising about 12 Ė 15 years ago. Iíve gradually traded up from a 23 footer to a 33 footer with a 25 footer and 29 footer on the way.

I have a few comments as follows:

1. You donít say where you are based and that would be useful to know to give you advice as to what to look for as makes of boats are quite different in Europe/UK and the USA. And there are differences in boat styles between UK and Europe too.

2. Donít buy a boat until you have had some experience. That will affect your judgement considerably, including about what to buy. Do a few Flotilla holidays. You might even meet future crew on these. The early and late season Flotillas often involve slightly longer trips moving boats from their wintering base to their cruising grounds which are great for slightly more challenging conditions as well as for meeting people and seeing places.

3. Get a sailing qualification. But most of all, get experience. Thatís where most of my learning has come from. A lot of the issues are about making judgements in unexpected circumstances. In the end I think thatís what makes a good skipper.

4. You talk about sailing in Europe and a possible Atlantic crossing. The seas in each area are quite different and one boat may not comfortably fit all (despite what the boat makers might say). Sailing around the UK is dominated by tides. That will also affect Northern European sailing (though to what extent I donít know). There are no tides to speak of in the Mediterranean. Much easier! But if you have no experience of sailing in tidal waters and then encounter them, youíll have a steep learning curve. A considerable issue in the Mediterranean will be heat. If you sail there you will need a boat with a Bimini to shade you from itís worst effects. But it can also get stormy in the Med and throw up nasty short, step seas. You wonít be affected by tides crossing the Atlantic. But the sea states you encounter will be very different, read up on that.

5. Get a boat that you can single hand comfortably and feel confident about single handing, but one where you can take crew if you want to.

6. Make sure your boat engine is big enough for the types of trips you want to do. My current boat is under-engined with an 18 horse Volvo meaning I can find myself doing as little as 2.5knts when motoring against the tide. Painful!

7. If you are going to the Med and possibly elsewhere in Europe, you will need a holding tank. If the boat you are keenest on hasnít got one, make sure she has the space to accommodate one.

8. If you are going across the Atlantic you will need a lot of tankage for fuel and water. Or room for a water maker. My last boat only carried 50 litres of water and 26 litres of fuel. Some people wouldnít get further than the Isle of Wight on that.

My last boat was a Beneteau First 285 Ė just under 29 ft. My current boat is a Westerly Storm 33. Only 4 foot longer but a much bigger boat in reality. The Westerly will sleep 7 (tight), but also I can and do singlehand her, though picking up a mooring single handed in a Force 6 is interesting. I wouldnít take the Beneteau First 285 across the Atlantic, good little boat that she was. My Westerly would be just about be big enough for that. But the main thing is that sheís solidly built and a good sea boat, and also quite quick (Iíve caught and passed a Contessa 32 and a Beneteau 38).

If you are in the UK, Iíd look at Sadlers, Westerlys, Moodys, Nicholsons (donít rule out a Nicholson 35), Rivals, Rustlers, Starlights and Island Packets. Some will be outside your £50k price range. But many wonít be. Spend about about £30k (youíd get a Westerly Storm for that) and then spend the other £20k on upgrades to the engine, electronics, sails, rigging etc. Contessas are great but quite low in the water compared to others and thus potentially quite wet. They also have a lot less cabin space comparatively. But how much space you need only you can judge Ė and some boats have poor storage space.

Finally think about a make of boat that you can sell on when the time comes. There are thousands of obscure makes that may be good boats but which have no Ďfollowingí. The above brands are well known and you are likely to get some interest when the time comes to sell, especially if they have been looked after and have a good pedigree.

But before buying, get some experience first! That will help you buy a boat you are proud to own. There is nothing worse than splashing the cash and then wishing youíd bought something else instead. Iím very happy that my Westerly Storm is the best boat I have ever bought and it was absolutely the right choice for me.

Good luck!

joelhemington 16-12-2019 10:45

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Carltonboyce (Post 3036931)
Hi,

Longtime lurker and newbie sailor.

I'm looking to buy my first, and possibly only, sailboat. I'm drawn to the classic looks and over-engineering of the Bristol Channel Cutter 28 and Nor'sea 27. I've read 20 affordable sailboats and 20 small boats, which is where the idea for a BCC comes from.

Looking to live on it for the next few years; only me at the moment but it would be nice to have space for someone else because who knows what the future might bring?

Initially for sailing around Europe but sailing to America would be a helluva achievement so blue water capability is important. Budget is £50,000.

Has anyone got any alternative suggestions please?

Thanks!

The first thing you should do is hang around local marinas and see if you can finangle a ride on some boats. The brand really won't matter at this point as you need to understand the difference that water line makes. Shorter boats with a lesser waterline will be much more susceptable to bouncing around in rough water than a longer boat. You'll find that a 32' boat will be much more stable than a 27'er - those extra few feet will really make a difference.

You mentioned that you'd like to cross the Atlantic. Even though this crossing is considered a "milk run" compared to most crossings, you'd be wise to have four people on board to handle the watch shifts which is doable in 32'er but would be very tight in something smaller.

For now, save your money and get some experience before making any plunge. Boats are not exactly a liquid asset and getting rid of one you really don't want can suck a great deal of time out of your future sailing plans.

Carltonboyce 16-12-2019 10:54

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Paul Kelly (Post 3037479)
Hi Carlton

Iíve been sailing for 40 years, but only properly graduated to cruising about 12 Ė 15 years ago. Iíve gradually traded up from a 23 footer to a 33 footer with a 25 footer and 29 footer on the way.

Good luck!


Thanks Paul, this is exactly the sort of advice I was looking for. I really appreciate you taking the time and trouble to give me such a comprehensive anser!

Siberian Sea 16-12-2019 11:08

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Iíve seen lately some really good deals on some Westsail 32. Not the turn key boats for sure as they were in need of some fixing and cleaning up but overall something good to get you going. Iíve always been partial to double enders and cutter rigs with a more traditional lines.

George DuBose 16-12-2019 11:16

Re: First, and possibly my last, boat
 
Hi Carlton,

If you are a handyman, you can find a strongly constructed boat that needs upgrades for not a lot of money.

I wanted a Pearson 36 and found one with a new engine, but the rest of the boat needed a complete overhaul. The electronics were out-dated, the wiring was a mess and the standing rigging needed changing.

After 10 years of sailing and finishing various projects in the winter, I now have a boat that is better than new.

When I brought her to Europe, I had to pay VAT and put the boat through a Post-Construction Assessment survey to get her 100% legal in the EU. Adding second lifelines, gaskets to the lazarette seats, a lock on the aft lazarette, a separate switch for the bilge pump, the ability to close off the dorade ventilation were the modifications I needed to pass the PCA.

Some of the work was not done to EU standards, but all of it was done to ABYC the Dutch inspector passed my US propane hose, even though in the EU, it is required to use copper lines.

So your choice with your budget is limited to how much work you can/want to do yourself, how much you have to "farm out" or buy a boat that has been well cared for.

As others wrote, it is always good to sail on as many different boats as you can and then you get a real feel of what you like and don't.


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