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jakinchitown 22-12-2016 16:50

Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
I have been sailing the Great Lakes since I was 10 years old in day sailers, from 11-30 feet. I understand the concepts of sailing, some about harbors and electronics, but am unsure how I should start looking at and planning for a boat I would live on. That is 5-8 years away, but want to get started.

Any suggestions?

Thanks

brianlara 3 22-12-2016 16:59

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Welcome Matey.
But do tell us about things like boat purchase budget, distance of horizons, crew numbers, monthly living expences / anticipated costs.
You're going to love this place.

GordMay 23-12-2016 04:48

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Greetings and welcome aboard the CF, Jack.

jakinchitown 23-12-2016 10:17

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Brianlara3, I would like to keep my boat purchase cost around $200k, I am planning on having it rigged for sailing shorthanded (by myself), I'm not sure I'll do an ocean crossing, but I'd like to be capable. My plan is to spend summers in Michigan on the Great Lakes and take the St Lawrence to the Atlantic down to FL or Caribbean for Winter. I would like total living expenses to be $50k per year, with repairing/upgrading major systems separate from that.

Does that sound realistic?

RickG 23-12-2016 10:29

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
How much time do you plan to be in a marina vs. mooring/anchor?

We're starting off for a couple of years in a marina while still working. That pushes down the priority of better battery bank, power generation, power conservation, water desal, storm preparation...

Cheers, RickG

SVNeko 23-12-2016 10:40

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
save every penny
Mr. Money Mustache — Early Retirement through Badassity

Mike OReilly 23-12-2016 10:41

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Hi Jack, I would say get a boat now, and go cruising as much as possible. You live in one of the great cruising areas of the world. The best way to learn is to do -- so go do.

I would buy an inexpensive, but solid older cruising boat; something in the 26 to 32 foot range. Go explore your surrounds, and then further as your skills develop. Learn how to manage all the systems of a typical cruising boat (rigging, deck, anchor, engine, sails, navigation, electronics, refrigeration, plumbing, head, etc…).

After you’ve cruised with this boat for a few years (seasonally) you’ll understand what you really need and want in The Boat.

jakinchitown 23-12-2016 10:44

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Mike OReilly, thanks. Good suggestion

Rick G, I would say about 65/35 anchor/mooring vs marina

Kenomac 23-12-2016 11:11

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mike OReilly (Post 2286321)
Hi Jack, I would say get a boat now, and go cruising as much as possible. You live in one of the great cruising areas of the world. The best way to learn is to do -- so go do.

I would buy an inexpensive, but solid older cruising boat; something in the 26 to 32 foot range. Go explore your surrounds, and then further as your skills develop. Learn how to manage all the systems of a typical cruising boat (rigging, deck, anchor, engine, sails, navigation, electronics, refrigeration, plumbing, head, etc…).

After you’ve cruised with this boat for a few years (seasonally) you’ll understand what you really need and want in The Boat.

I would suggest doing the opposite (not to be contrary). Your budget allows for a purchase in the 45ft range less than 12 years old, so buy something fully equipped, be comfortable and enjoy your sailing adventures.

Meanwhile, save your money, obtain a charter license and charter a 40 footer once a year leading up to your purchase. Don't get buried financially and emotionally on some old fixer-upper, focus instead on the end game.

chuckr 24-12-2016 02:04

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by jakinchitown (Post 2286305)
Brianlara3, I would like to keep my boat purchase cost around $200k, I am planning on having it rigged for sailing shorthanded (by myself), I'm not sure I'll do an ocean crossing, but I'd like to be capable. My plan is to spend summers in Michigan on the Great Lakes and take the St Lawrence to the Atlantic down to FL or Caribbean for Winter. I would like total living expenses to be $50k per year, with repairing/upgrading major systems separate from that.

Does that sound realistic?


We sail a Jeanneau DS40 and I single handed it for a year up and down the east coast of the USA -- but you need to make a list of what you want in a boat and start a search and attend a bunch of boat shows not to buy but to look and see and learn what you like and what you don't

as for cost there are 2 of us and we capture each penny we spend - about 2.5-3k per month
our 7 years expenses are here -- https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/...ta-164643.html

wrwakefield 24-12-2016 09:56

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Welcome to the forum.

I would suggest you consider building up your reference library...

I recommend you begin by giving yourself the gift of The Voyager's Handbook by Beth Leonard.

Enjoy the journey...

Cheers! Bill

SoundWave 24-12-2016 10:05

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by chuckr (Post 2286664)
as for cost there are 2 of us and we capture each penny we spend - about 2.5-3k per month
our 7 years expenses are here -- https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/...ta-164643.html

Thanks, Chuckr, for sharing.
This is really helpful for us being realistic for casting off in 2019

Don1500 24-12-2016 10:22

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
As Mike said, first things first, buy your boat. Live on it, make it home, love your boat and enjoy being on her. But remember, like any woman she'll have things that drive you crazy. You may even want a divorce. But it's better to find out now than later.

If you're in the Great Lakes the only way to get to the Gulf on the water requires you to pass under some low fixed bridges. You'll have to unstep your mast before entering the canal system in Chicago. I don't know for sure how far south you'll have to go before you can put it back up. Prepare a cradle before you go, you may decide to keep the mast down until you get to the Gulf.

Ardbeg 24-12-2016 10:23

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
I assume you are looking to pay in USD $200K . With the exchange rates, you could buy one hell of a boat for that kind of money in Canada. I would lean towards a bigger boat for live abord. Just make sure it is solid. You might not always be single handed. I have been learning my boat for 5 years on Lake Ontario so I am ready to head down the St Lawrence in June. Counting the days.

Mike OReilly 24-12-2016 10:35

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Perhaps I should expand on the reasoning for my advice.

First off, I really do believe the best way to learn the cruising lifestyle is to do. You’ll quickly discover (as you likely already know) that sailing is the easiest part about the cruising lifestyle. It’s all the other stuff about owning and living with a cruising vessel that is the challenge. Cruising is not the same as chartering for a week or two a year. That is called vacationing. Cruising is about living and exploring from a smallish sailboat that you are responsible for.

Secondly, unless you are very wise, it is hard to know what is important to you and your crew in the choice of boat right off the bat. Spend a few months living and travelling on a boat and you’ll start to learn what you really want and need — what’s really important to the way you want to cruise.

The OP lives on the Great Lakes — an amazing seasonal cruising ground. With a boat in the 26 to 32 foot range (s)he can get going right away. Start learning how to manage this floating, moving home. All without a major outlay of cash. Go bigger if you must, but at this range you can find inexpensive quality boats that contain all the standard systems found on all cruising boats. And at this range there is no where on the Great Lakes that are out of reach.

My suggestion is clearly not the only way. Some people have successfully gone the chartering route, and bought The Boat right off the bat. But if you poll most cruisers here you’ll quickly learn that most of us have gone through multiple previous boats before arriving at their current The Boat.

gjordan 24-12-2016 11:00

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Something that you probably didnt learn in daysailors, but is critically important for a cruiser is anchoring skills and how to set your ground tackle up for short handed cruising. The anchoring section of CF is full of endless arguments on what is the best (which is all opinions) ground tackle, but reading there can give you a lot of information. Good ground tackle and knowing how to use it, is the best insurance policy a boat can have. Just another 2 cents worth. _____Grant.

johnny AoB 24-12-2016 13:56

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
In case you have not discovered AdventuresOnBoats.com, it is the collected wisdom of hundreds of cruisers on all topics sailing and cruising with a few extra thrown in. Check it out, as it has helped many before you.
-johnny

brianlara 3 24-12-2016 14:08

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by johnny AoB (Post 2286977)
In case you have not discovered AdventuresOnBoats.com, it is the collected wisdom of hundreds of cruisers on all topics sailing and cruising with a few extra thrown in. Check it out, as it has helped many before you.
-johnny

Thanks for that reference Johnny. Your Christmas gift to me....you might just have saved my butt, you never know. Nice present...Merry Christmas and a quiet and pleasant next 4 years to you and all Americans.

touchngo 24-12-2016 14:47

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
I'll second Mike O'Reilly. Just do it. 45 years of sailing, 7 seasons in the Med, and 2 years full time live aboard, and I'm learning new stuff every day. Jump in. If you want to be an expert...have a it. Take your courses, get your certs, save your money, buy your dream boat, and live your dream.

Or...

If you want to enjoy life and enjoy the new challenges it throws your way every day, just jump in and buy the smaller more affordable 30 year old good old boat and come on out.

Sailing is the easy part (and so is navigating). Experience comes from doing it, not from dreaming it.

Either way, being out here doing it sure beats sitting in an office saving for it.

PT

PS. Like Chuckr, it costs us around 1500-1800 Euro a month all in (about $2500 USD per month all in with travel, maint, food etc...). But there are many folk we meet doing it for less, and quite a few doing it on more.... You will find that it costs as much as you have, regardless of what you have. The hard part is making the decision to go.

Bulawayo 24-12-2016 15:19

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kenomac (Post 2286341)
I would suggest doing the opposite (not to be contrary). Your budget allows for a purchase in the 45ft range less than 12 years old, so buy something fully equipped, be comfortable and enjoy your sailing adventures.

Meanwhile, save your money, obtain a charter license and charter a 40 footer once a year leading up to your purchase. Don't get buried financially and emotionally on some old fixer-upper, focus instead on the end game.


Totally agree.......buy right the first time after identifying parameters via chartering. Also, you'll save on moorings, maintenance, insurance etc in the meanwhile (unless you live aboard). You'll also understand what you need in the way of 'kit'.

pcmm 24-12-2016 15:44

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Are you travelling alone? with significant other? if alone, then stay way under 40ft. its a lot of boat to handle alone while you're still learning. but something 30-35 for now. It will make the trip no problem. $200K for a boat is soooo much money unless you want something really new ( which doesn't mean you won't be spending $ fixing it!) get something now. you can get great boats for under $50k no problem be in the 35ft range and everything is easier. slip fees are lower, equipement costs are lower. fuel bills lower,etc. etc.

Don't wait 5-8 years, GO NOW! you don;'t know where you'll be financially or health in 5-8 years so why wait.

Kenomac 24-12-2016 16:01

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Once again the go now, go small and go cheap camping crowd forgets that cruising doesn't have to be a 100% sell everything and live the rest of one's life on-the-cheap proposition.

Life can be enjoyed just as much (or even more) by cruising part-time and saving up for the "Dream." I doesn't need to be all all-or nothing lifestyle.

For six years now, we've been cruising full-time for five-six months, then back to work for six-seven months.

pcmm 24-12-2016 17:03

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kenomac (Post 2287033)
Once again the go now, go small and go cheap camping crowd forgets that cruising doesn't have to be a 100% sell everything and live the rest of one's life on-the-cheap proposition.

Life can be enjoyed just as much (or even more) by cruising part-time and saving up for the "Dream." I doesn't need to be all all-or nothing lifestyle.

For six years now, we've been cruising full-time for five-six months, then back to work for six-seven months.

Not at all what I was going for. 35 feet is definitely comfortable, not camping at all. but you also don't need to spend $200k on a boat to be comfortable. he hasn't even gone yet, so why spend soo much money the first go round? What if he decides he doesn't like it? that's a lot of money down the drain!!

Kenomac 24-12-2016 19:10

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by pcmm (Post 2287062)
Not at all what I was going for. 35 feet is definitely comfortable, not camping at all. but you also don't need to spend $200k on a boat to be comfortable. he hasn't even gone yet, so why spend soo much money the first go round? What if he decides he doesn't like it? that's a lot of money down the drain!!

'Sounds to me more like the OP is working hard and saving up to do things the way he wants to do it. $200k will buy him more comfort aboard a newer boat in five years time. Meanwhile, he can learn and enjoy cruising part-time or occasionally as time permits.

$200k might seem like a lot of money to some folks on CF, to others it's a starting point and to others it's chump change.

pcmm 24-12-2016 20:19

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kenomac (Post 2287112)
'Sounds to me more like the OP is working hard and saving up to do things the way he wants to do it. $200k will buy him more comfort aboard a newer boat in five years time. Meanwhile, he can learn and enjoy cruising part-time or occasionally as time permits.

$200k might seem like a lot of money to some folks on CF, to others it's a starting point and to others it's chump change.

Agreed. For me $200k is my boat, crusing money, AND probably $120k to come back with and buy another house!

SailingFan 24-12-2016 22:11

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Chump change?

Well, if that is so little, how's about someone donate about three or four grand (mere pennies, I tell you!) for me to finish off my sailboat and pay my yard fees off, and I will come out and meet you for a beer in the Bahamas this spring?:biggrin:

Better yet, front me 20 grand and I will buy another boat that is ready for the trip as-is, and we will meet for lobster someplace!:biggrin:

Just sayin' is all...:whistling:

I am easy to please!:thumb:

wannacat 25-12-2016 07:45

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Wait another couple of years to purchase and save more money meanwhile. Lots of Cats coming out of the charter fleets in the 38-42 ft range. Dress one up a bit with some solar and whatever else you think you might need. You won't have to change boats again. Plus you'll have tons of room for yourself and even a mate if you stumble upon one. So buy a Cat and don't look back!!!

Kenomac 25-12-2016 07:52

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by wannacat (Post 2287300)
Wait another couple of years to purchase and save more money meanwhile. Lots of Cats coming out of the charter fleets in the 38-42 ft range. Dress one up a bit with some solar and whatever else you think you might need. You won't have to change boats again. Plus you'll have tons of room for yourself and even a mate if you stumble upon one. So buy a Cat and don't look back!!!

Excellent advice. :thumb: Look for an owner's version.

pcmm 25-12-2016 08:46

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kenomac (Post 2287307)
Excellent advice. :thumb: Look for an owner's version.

Cats are great, just keep in mind that almost all the costs for a cat are double that of a mono hull!!

Kenomac 25-12-2016 09:26

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by pcmm (Post 2287322)
Cats are great, just keep in mind that almost all the costs for a cat are double that of a mono hull!!

Another myth.

Even in the Med, there're many nice marinas that charge the same rate for cats and monohulls. Cats have two engines to service, but each one is used only half as much. Doing the engine service myself on our mono costs less than $100 per season. Most marinas in the US are older and can't accomodate cats, but elsewhere in the world, especially where Med mooring is common, cats can be moored just as easily. Anchoring costs are the same. :biggrin:

pcmm 25-12-2016 21:49

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kenomac (Post 2287344)
Another myth.

Even in the Med, there're many nice marinas that charge the same rate for cats and monohulls. Cats have two engines to service, but each one is used only half as much. Doing the engine service myself on our mono costs less than $100 per season. Most marinas in the US are older and can't accomodate cats, but elsewhere in the world, especially where Med mooring is common, cats can be moored just as easily. Anchoring costs are the same. :biggrin:

Not a myth at all, just reality. You have 2 engines = twice the cost for all maintenance items, and no they don't get used half as much, that's just false! Storage is calculated by square footage and a 45ft cat is going to be almost twice the width of a mono. Rigging is more expensive as its heavier for the same size boat, heavier blocks, etc. all just reality! You do 2 oil changes for each one I do. For the boat size you have more systems, cats just tend to. So more maintenance.

Hobie_ind 25-12-2016 23:13

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by pcmm (Post 2287702)
Not a myth at all, just reality. You have 2 engines = twice the cost for all maintenance items, and no they don't get used half as much, that's just false! Storage is calculated by square footage and a 45ft cat is going to be almost twice the width of a mono. Rigging is more expensive as its heavier for the same size boat, heavier blocks, etc. all just reality! You do 2 oil changes for each one I do. For the boat size you have more systems, cats just tend to. So more maintenance.

As with a lot of the debates here on CF....... this response seems to ignore the reality of........ It depends.

We've had this discussion numerous times in the Caribbean and South Pacific many times over sundowners and I certainly haven't heard anything to convince it's even close to double. It's a topic I'm interested in since I've often considered whether our next boat will be a cat.

Full time cruising, anchoring out almost all the time? If so, storage cost is basically irrelevant, plus a comparable cat is generally a bit shorter than a comparable mono. The marina i was just at had rates of about 1.5 times for cats. We've been at a few where the rates were 1.25. Never have I seen double. Mooring balls were rarely any more expensive than monos. Friends with cats hauling at yards we've been at weren't charged double for haulouts and yard rates. They varied between the same and about 1.25. I'm sure there are areas with marinas and yards that cost double, but it certainly shouldn't be a blanket statement.

I can't say that my engine represented more than 15-20% of my maintenance costs over the past 4 years. So even if it was double, and it wouldn't double the total maintenance costs.,,Our cat friends generally had much smaller engines and parts were cheaper, not half, but cheaper. Most did motor with only one engine most of the time except for maneuvering. A lot didn't have generators or run their engines for charging batteries as much as a lot of monos because of the acres of solar panels that are so easily put on cats! Comparing notes generally didn't indicate double the amount of anti-fouling needed (shallower hulls, keels etc). Spare parts carried were generally the same even though they had two. One starter, water pump, belts, etc, etc. Maybe a couple extra $20 filters. Same nav gear, wind instruments. fridge, stove, potable water pumps, hot water heater, charger/inverter, radios, AIS, radar, watermaker, heads (again...depends), windlass, anchors, anchor chain, etc. Generally the same number of winches to service, travellers, sheets, sails, etc. A friends 48' cat had the same size winches as our 53' mono. Halyards were the same size, but about 10-15' longer. Sails were a mixed bag. Larger Genoa/smaller main on the mono, smaller job, lather main on the cat. Quotes they had for new mains and Genoa didn't come out to double what friends on a 50' mono with a battened main were quoted for theirs. Maybe 125%. For our ketch, the quotes I got would have made it close to a wash.

More expensive, but double? I don't think it's even close to that, and please don't get the cat guys going on the resale value part of the equation...... you won't win. The market is speaking clearly on that one right now. The flip side is, there's some outstanding buys out there in monohull land right now!

Sorry. CF frustrates me sometimes......

aquadreams 25-12-2016 23:27

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Hi BrianLara,

I'm working on my five year plan too and now about two years out. I've been learning all I can prior to purchase by using sailing schools for acquiring skills, chartering locally for day and weekend sailing here in San Francisco about 20-30 times a year, chartering weekly long trips once or twice a year, and going to boat shows. The chartering has helped me figure out what I want / don't want in a boat. Boats shows often have seminars on the cruising life, how to inspect and buy a boat, and more.

Other ideas I have are to become a sailing instructor locally and to get a six pack or captains license, and maybe be crew for a delivery, rally (the Baha-haha from San Diego to Cabo), or transpac race. You probably have options for similar there in Michigan.

I've also taken and recommend some seminars like the US Sailing Safety at Sea, where you get to deploy and climbing into a liferaft in full gear and play with flares and fire extinguishers.

One thing I don't see often discussed is medical emergency prepareness. I've taken first aid and CPR but for myself don't feel it's enough. So I might take an EMT certification course at a community college. Some might say this is overkill but I want to be able to handle typical situations like this - Two Afloat Sailing, Ep 8 - Medical Emergency. This is from an EMT couple that cruises. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OvWibTyPvg8.

All this is just my opinion. As someone already said, you'll hear a lot from the buy small go now crowd. Do what's right for you and have fun on your journey!

Cheers,
Joe

StuM 26-12-2016 01:56

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by pcmm (Post 2287702)
Not a myth at all, just reality. You have 2 engines = twice the cost for all maintenance items, and no they don't get used half as much, that's just false!

So you know better than me how I use my engines? Wrong!

Quote:

Storage is calculated by square footage and a 45ft cat is going to be almost twice the width of a mono.
So you know how much I pay for marina fees and how they are calcuated? Wrong!

Quote:

Rigging is more expensive as its heavier for the same size boat, heavier blocks, etc. all just reality!
True, if by "the same sized boat", you mean boat length. My 43ft cat is not comparable to a 43ft mono in many other metrics either.

Quote:

You do 2 oil changes for each one I do.
Refer to the first point above!

Quote:

For the boat size you have more systems, cats just tend to. So more maintenance.
Refer to the second last point above.

Bulawayo 26-12-2016 02:49

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Hi PCMM, I would be interested to understand the source of your information. It needs to be appreciated that you must compare like with like. If you compare a 40ft cat with a 40ft mono-hull then its likely the costs could (not definately) be higher for a cat, but then you are not doing an apples for apples comparison, are you?
Ive been a cat liveaboard since 1995 and have not experienced the matters you quote. Yes, we have two engines but, unless circumstances dictate it, only one motor is in use; its not a false statement, rather fact. The same applies with all my cat owning friends. We are only occassionally charged more for our beam - usually on haul out, which is rare as we usually park on a beach for maintenance (between tides).
I could go on and on, but at the end of the day these matters are clearly misunderstood by some people. I too used to be a mono-hull sailor and I 'knew' how unsafe catamarans were and how expensive they were to own. Then, I had an experience that changed my mind and have been a cat owner ever since - and am very happy with my choice.
Rather than turning this into yet another debate over mono vs cats, please appreciate that some folk prefer one over the other and both can be right. Please also understand that before commenting on costs of operating (not purchasing) that there are many influencing factors. There are still so many fallacies out there.




Quote:

Originally Posted by pcmm (Post 2287702)
Not a myth at all, just reality. You have 2 engines = twice the cost for all maintenance items, and no they don't get used half as much, that's just false! Storage is calculated by square footage and a 45ft cat is going to be almost twice the width of a mono. Rigging is more expensive as its heavier for the same size boat, heavier blocks, etc. all just reality! You do 2 oil changes for each one I do. For the boat size you have more systems, cats just tend to. So more maintenance.


Kenomac 26-12-2016 06:27

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by pcmm (Post 2287702)
Not a myth at all, just reality. You have 2 engines = twice the cost for all maintenance items, and no they don't get used half as much, that's just false! Storage is calculated by square footage and a 45ft cat is going to be almost twice the width of a mono. Rigging is more expensive as its heavier for the same size boat, heavier blocks, etc. all just reality! You do 2 oil changes for each one I do. For the boat size you have more systems, cats just tend to. So more maintenance.

All the cat owners we know, which is quite a few, only use one engine at a time when underway motoring. Two engines when docking. The cats may be twice as wide, but to compare comparable deck and cabin space to a monohull, the cat tends to be much shorter than a comparable monohull. We compared a 66ft Oyster to a 45ft Lagoon and Fountaine Pajot. Storage fees, cabin and deck space, maintenance fees etc.... all about the same. The size of a boat needs to be compared by square footage, not by the length.

But you can go on believing the myth if you like. :biggrin:

fred4936 26-12-2016 07:06

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Hi all. When my wife and I decided we wanted to try the cruising life, we bought an old Tartan 27-2 as a practice boat. We have both sailed most of our lives, but not a lot of cruising. So we chose this boat to learn what we want and do not want, like and do not like, and just jumped in. We sailed on TNT ocea for the first time, off the south shore of Long Island, New York, and will expand upon that further. This boat I can easily singlehanded, and the costs are still reasonable. We converted to electric auxiliary power, which had worked well for us. In another year or so, we will be ready for THE boat, but we will know much more when we reach that point.

pcmm 26-12-2016 07:29

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kenomac (Post 2287818)
All the cat owners we know, which is quite a few, only use one engine at a time when underway motoring. Two engines when docking. The cats may be twice as wide, but to compare comparable deck and cabin space to a monohull, the cat tends to be much shorter than a comparable monohull. We compared a 66ft Oyster to a 45ft Lagoon and Fountaine Pajot. Storage fees, cabin and deck space, maintenance fees etc.... all about the same. The size of a boat needs to be compared by square footage, not by the length.

But you can go on believing the myth if you like. :biggrin:

Interesting argument, problem is people don't go looking at 65monos and compare them to 45ft cats! they compare a 45 mono to a 45 cat. People just don't compare things that way. They look at boats of the same length when doing the comparison. It's inaccurate I know but thats how people think. As far as the one engine thing. that's interesting. I've never run across that with Cat owners before, but what I have very often run across is that cats seem to motor a hell of a lot more than mono's even when the wind is good. Don't know why but that's consistent! (which to me negates the less engine use bit)

Anyway. What the OP really needs to do is take his time and figure out what he wants a Mono might be perfect for him a cat might be perfect for him. just big differences in price, availability of models to work up through. etc.

Van Der Beek 26-12-2016 09:32

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Hobie_ind (Post 2287715)
More expensive, but double? I don't think it's even close to that, and please don't get the cat guys going on the resale value part of the equation...... you won't win. The market is speaking clearly on that one right now.

Resell value all depends on what sailboat you have, on some boats you can almost get your money back. I don't know if this holds true with catamarans.

In any case. Some people prefer sailboats others prefer catamarans.

StuM 26-12-2016 14:14

Re: Starting to plan for a Cruising Life
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by pcmm (Post 2287842)
Interesting argument, problem is people don't go looking at 65monos and compare them to 45ft cats! they compare a 45 mono to a 45 cat. People just don't compare things that way. They look at boats of the same length when doing the comparison. It's inaccurate I know but thats how people think.

If by "people", you mean you do, then correct.

Quote:

As far as the one engine thing. that's interesting. I've never run across that with Cat owners before,
You obviously have very little knowledge of cats to back up your wild assertions then. Just to get you started, you'll find a pretty good consensus among many cat owners here:

https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/...es-176373.html

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but what I have very often run across is that cats seem to motor a hell of a lot more than mono's even when the wind is good. Don't know why but that's consistent! (which to me negates the less engine use bit)
Another misconception that that's been done to death many times here on CF.

Take it here: https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/...-a-148849.html


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