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scottorious 04-12-2016 13:55

Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
So I recently found myself caught up in the world of shopping around for all the latest and greatest sailing equipment. That was exciting but also very disappointing. Anything that says "marine grade" or for sailing in general just seems prohibitively expensive. Trying to educate myself on how to properly outfit my Cal 34 I see so many people saying that it's just unwise and dangerous to not have X item and the countless other things. Is there a large resource for people building their own gear? I could cut and weld up an anchor in an afternoon and send it to the galvanizer for seemingly 1/3 the cost of a new fancy anchor. Is there a reason I don't see more of that? Why are people so deathly afraid of the atomic 4? Seems dead simple and smooth as glass, most people have gasoline dinghy engines and keep gas on board anyway, same with propane. Seems like there are countless other things which seem more like wants than needs and someone fairly handy could do there own. I'm just wondering if anyone knows of resources or places where DIY guys congregate.

brianlara 3 04-12-2016 14:56

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by scottorious (Post 2272443)
So I recently found myself caught up in the world of shopping around for all the latest and greatest sailing equipment. That was exciting but also very disappointing. Anything that says "marine grade" or for sailing in general just seems prohibitively expensive. Trying to educate myself on how to properly outfit my Cal 34 I see so many people saying that it's just unwise and dangerous to not have X item and the countless other things. Is there a large resource for people building their own gear? I could cut and weld up an anchor in an afternoon and send it to the galvanizer for seemingly 1/3 the cost of a new fancy anchor. Is there a reason I don't see more of that? Why are people so deathly afraid of the atomic 4? Seems dead simple and smooth as glass, most people have gasoline dinghy engines and keep gas on board anyway, same with propane. Seems like there are countless other things which seem more like wants than needs and someone fairly handy could do there own. I'm just wondering if anyone knows of resources or places where DIY guys congregate.

With respect, I can't see a LOT of followers coming on board re making a cheaper anchor etc.
Atomic 4. I'm an old mechanic and so can see very clearly why petrol engines are WAY less safe than diesels.....the hull of a yacht is a collector for explosive gases.
Take an old tin can. Put in 3 drops (only) of gasoline. Leave in sun for ten seconds, light the end of a ten foot stick, lower stick onto can but have eyes closed. That is why for inboard installations diesel is WAY !!!! safer than gasoline. Trust me.....I implore you.
Fwiw.

skipmac 04-12-2016 15:25

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
No argument that diesel is far safer than gas but at the same time, with proper care gas can be very safe. Yes if you screw up you just made a bomb (boat blew just last week at Green Cove Springs from a gas leak) but at the same time there are tens if not hundreds of thousands of gasoline powered boats around the world and even with careless newbies operating a lot of them, very few blow up.

Regarding a homemade anchor, sure you might save a few bucks but I think some of the weights, balance, angles, etc on the new gen anchors can be fairly critical to quick setting and holding power. I would focus on saving more money in other areas.

Regarding you will die if you don't have X on your boat. Bull. I cruised for many years on boats with nothing but depth sounder, knot meter and a VHF radio. No radar, GPS, chart plotter, satellite radios. Paper charts and for long passages a sextant.

I will say, having cruised with and without all the gadgets, having a GPS can make it a lot easier to cruise safely (using the GPS properly and not forgetting to use your other tools) but you can get by with a handheld that you buy used for $100.

So don't get hung up in the gear deal. Learn navigation and seamanship and the gadgets can come when you can or want to afford them.

brianlara 3 04-12-2016 16:20

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
My biggest objection regading Atomic engines or ANY gasoline engine "when fitted within the confines of a hull" is this.
Unless a gas engine is fuel injected (and Atomics et al ) aren't, they have a carburettor.
And by design a carburettor MUST have a 'needle & seat'.
This component plays 2 roles:
First, to control float level so that correct air:fuel ratio is maintained. Easy.
Second, the n&s also stems the uncontrolled volume of fuel supplied by the fuel pump. Easy.

Here's the crunch. A foreign body as long a 1/32 of an inch and THINNER than a human hair can (and does) render the needle & seat inoperable and gasoline flooding MUST occur.

Sure filters help, but.
I'm simply saying that if two identical boats were being considered, one gas, one diesel, then the diesel equipped boat is worth thousands more than the gas for multiple reasons.
Not my humble opinion. More than qualified.

a64pilot 04-12-2016 16:41

Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
See I think in some instances a gas motor could be better.
Usually lighter weight and much lower NVH, meaning noise,vibration and harshness.
For a day sailer I see the benefits, but then I see many benefits for an outboard in that situation too

Panope 04-12-2016 16:44

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
The designers of the best anchors have spent years or sometimes decades perfecting thier work (art?). They make and test an endless number of prototypes.

A "cut and weld up anchor in an afternoon" effort would have a near zero chance of performing in the same league as the top performers.

If one were to painstakingly COPY an existing design (with the exact same metals), I suspect a proper job will take a bit longer than an afternoon, and cost nearly as much as the real thing.

I'd look for a second hand anchor if money is tight.

Steve

brianlara 3 04-12-2016 16:57

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by a64pilot (Post 2272557)
See I think in some instances a gas motor could be better.
Usually lighter weight and much lower NVH, meaning noise,vibration and harshness.
For a day sailer I see the benefits, but then I see many benefits for an outboard in that situation too

I agree A64. Indeed, I'd cruise the world with an Atom or similar if necessary.
Trouble with gas monitors re fuel leaks is that with numerous things on the motor pruducing sparks continuously, by the time the monitor tells you that vapours exist I suspect that they might already have ignited (i.e. exploded)
I think a top shelf monitor, perfect fuel hoses at all times, renew the needle and seat regularly, fit a new fuel filter diaphragm &valves regularly and have the best Racor gasoline filter available. I think with those precautions, not forgetting tank filling and venting precautions, that in some instances, eg a catalina 30 or 34 etc, a gas engine has benefits : NVH especially.
A gas engine wouldn't stop this expert from buying THE RIGHT BOAT.
FWIW.

barnakiel 04-12-2016 17:05

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
I have seen homebuilt anchors, some of them to a very high standard. So this is definitely doable. The rest of it (the boat) can also be built very well at home. Where there is skill.

I am not sure there is anything sailing that cannot be homebuilt. You CAN get a fine cruising boat this way and way cheaper than in the dealership .... but ... how much time will it take?

Would you not prefer to BUY stuff and spend the time SAILING?

I have a homebrew proverb and I like repeating it: building boats and sailing boats are two completely different sports.

But, an anchor, a mast, a new ballast bulb, yes, one can build them.

;-)

b.

topmast 04-12-2016 17:11

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Building your own stuff (anchors, roller furling, self steering tankage, rigging and on and on) used to be common here in BC. I 've made nearly all the bits at one time or another and assure you it was as good or better than storebought Times and expectations change and it's gotta be shiny /new.to cover a common lack of skills. (I was into classic wood and Brent S was into cruising steel . If you want real ,don't waste time on gas Can be done .A clean wake , eh!

yalnud 04-12-2016 17:19

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Well sir. I am a journeyman fabricator and welder and i am here to tell you that i can and i absolutely intend to cut up and weld my own anchor. Its not very hard to walk down the docks and measure uo a roccna and re-create it. Ive checked pricing on stainless and i can do a 45# roccna for about 300 bucks. I think if your handy. It an absolutely viable savings.

Cormorant 04-12-2016 17:32

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
This never reached a working prototype that I know of, but there was a lot of input toward a homemade "open-source" anchor design a few years back:

https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/...ct-113732.html

brianlara 3 04-12-2016 17:36

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by yalnud (Post 2272599)
Well sir. I am a journeyman fabricator and welder and i am here to tell you that i can and i absolutely intend to cut up and weld my own anchor. Its not very hard to walk down the docks and measure uo a roccna and re-create it. Ive checked pricing on stainless and i can do a 45# roccna for about 300 bucks. I think if your handy. It an absolutely viable savings.

Yep! It's all about a balance between the time v's money .availabilities

scottorious 04-12-2016 20:22

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Oh wow! Thanks for all the answers. I certainly understand the dangers of the gas engine. But with a proper working bilge blower do I not mitigate that risk substantially? How many diesel boats still have gasoline on them or even propane? I just love how that little engines purs. I can't imagine switching over to a diesel. I also like the idea of only keeping one fuel on the boat.

I understand that often times someone has gone through hours of research and development to come up with anchor design as well as other things but part of what I love about sailing is my independence and the more I buy from other people the more reliant I am on other people if said gear breaks or malfunctionsomething.

I might be way off here but I'm used to just building or improvising whatever I need and I definitely want to do more of that on my boat.

scottorious 04-12-2016 20:24

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Oh, and the question about time. I'm a great Lakes sailor so my boat spends as much time out of the water as it does in the water. Winter boat projects sound fun!

Stumble 04-12-2016 20:55

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by scottorious (Post 2272443)
So I recently found myself caught up in the world of shopping around for all the latest and greatest sailing equipment. That was exciting but also very disappointing. Anything that says "marine grade" or for sailing in general just seems prohibitively expensive. Trying to educate myself on how to properly outfit my Cal 34 I see so many people saying that it's just unwise and dangerous to not have X item and the countless other things. Is there a large resource for people building their own gear? I could cut and weld up an anchor in an afternoon and send it to the galvanizer for seemingly 1/3 the cost of a new fancy anchor. Is there a reason I don't see more of that? Why are people so deathly afraid of the atomic 4? Seems dead simple and smooth as glass, most people have gasoline dinghy engines and keep gas on board anyway, same with propane. Seems like there are countless other things which seem more like wants than needs and someone fairly handy could do there own. I'm just wondering if anyone knows of resources or places where DIY guys congregate.

As a former marine supplier....

The major problem with building for the maritime industry and why things are so expensive is that the quality is generally higher, and the number sold I see much, much lower.

Just as an example, if you want to build a quality stainless product for anyone else 304 and simple welds are fine, maybe grind the weld a bit and call it a day. A qualitystainless weld for the maritime world needs to be tig welded, then ground, then passivate/electropolished. And for marine parts it needs to be welded at the very minimum temperature to prevent chromium dropout. It tricky, hard to do well, and results in a lot of rejected parts.

Then you sell maybe 10% the number of parts that you would in any other industry with long shelf times. All of which adds up to more expensive parts.

As for a homemade anchor... sure you can do it. But evena set of calipers won't be enough. Modern anchors are composites. Most use a steel body with lead weights to get the balance correct. So you also need to take an anchor and match the external dimensions, then add enough lead to the tip to match the balance. Off course you also need void less full penetration welds all done under inert conditions at very low temperatures followed by polishing and passivation.

I guess if you have the equipment and skill to do quality marine work you could make it for less than retail, but not if you pay yourself for the time.

gjordan 04-12-2016 21:12

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Ground tackle is one thing I would not recommend a do it yourself job simply because angles are more critical than good or bad welds. Lots of gear can be home made, but there is so much perfectly functional gear for sale used that it might be more trouble than its worth. I am the poster boy for the frugal sailor thread due to being on a fixed income, so I buy very carefully and mostly used. In the last month I have bought an anchor windlass for $125 that retails (slightly newer model) for $4600 and a propane stove that retails for $2000 and paid $300. One burner has to be light with a match, but that wont bother me nearly as much as spending $1700 more for a new one would. My point is that many people have the emotional need to buy the newest and latest gadget that is on the market (or is heavily advertised) and most of it is WANTED BUT NOT NEEDED. If you dont have that need, Craigslist and Ebay become your friend. You can cruise safely without spending huge amounts of money. You just wont be the fancy boat on the dock, but again,I dont think an anchor is a good place to save money. Just my (very frugal) 2 cents worth. ____Grant.

brianlara 3 04-12-2016 21:28

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by scottorious (Post 2272717)
Oh wow! Thanks for all the answers. I certainly understand the dangers of the gas engine. But with a proper working bilge blower do I not mitigate that risk substantially? How many diesel boats still have gasoline on them or even propane? I just love how that little engines purs. I can't imagine switching over to a diesel. I also like the idea of only keeping one fuel on the boat.

I understand that often times someone has gone through hours of research and development to come up with anchor design as well as other things but part of what I love about sailing is my independence and the more I buy from other people the more reliant I am on other people if said gear breaks or malfunctionsomething.

I might be way off here but I'm used to just building or improvising whatever I need and I definitely want to do more of that on my boat.

Scottorious. If other experts here wish to disagree with me they can and I couldn't care less. But re your bilge blower suggestion. Yes, a bilge blower and I have the best one Jabsco make.
BUT, any fuel leak which is so severe that it could ignite comes on very quickly. A needle and seat seals...or it doesn't. !! If it fails then it usually does so without warning and fuel will gush out of the carburettor at great volume..no warning. Fuel pump diaphragm have no splits....or they split. Long before a detector can detect and long before your magical blower can evacuate (even 10% of the vapour/ liquid) you are likely to have a catastrophic explosion.
Your suggest of a blower reeks of SECONDARY safety , too late, horse has bolted. Boom.
Read again about the PRIMARY precautions I spoke of in my previous post.
PREVENT THE CAUSE, DON'T TRY TO CURE THE EFFECT BECAUSE WITH PETROL, NO 2ND CHANCES.
Do as I suggested in my previous post and you'll be fine. Remember, carburettor, fuel pump, fuel filter (no toys!) and perfect hoses.
You'll be fine if you read carefully.

valhalla360 04-12-2016 21:39

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
I think the reason you don't see a lot of people building anchors is it's mostly used boat buyers who would consider building their own but used boats typically come with an anchor...or four and anchors on most boats will last decades so, there isn't a lot of need to build anchors.

ozsailer 04-12-2016 23:08

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Just in regard to making our own anchor. It may well be worth a quick call to your insurance company to see if they will still cover your boat if you have a home made anchor. It may be the case they will require an engineers certicate as to the holding power of your anchor otherwise they may not honour a claim where an incident has occured where you have dragged anchor.


Greg H
Sunshine

scottorious 05-12-2016 06:29

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Good call on the insurance. Sv seeker on YouTube has some good looking anchors I saw.

I understand all the points said, I'll have to be really careful with it.

Synthetic rigging seems really diy.

I've seen some diy windvane designs, anyone have good input on that?

Has anyone used 12 volt self contained refrigerators?

Does anyone build sails? That one seems beyond my ability.

skipmac 05-12-2016 06:56

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by brianlara 3 (Post 2272543)
My biggest objection regading Atomic engines or ANY gasoline engine "when fitted within the confines of a hull" is this.
Unless a gas engine is fuel injected (and Atomics et al ) aren't, they have a carburettor.
And by design a carburettor MUST have a 'needle & seat'.
This component plays 2 roles:
First, to control float level so that correct air:fuel ratio is maintained. Easy.
Second, the n&s also stems the uncontrolled volume of fuel supplied by the fuel pump. Easy.

Here's the crunch. A foreign body as long a 1/32 of an inch and THINNER than a human hair can (and does) render the needle & seat inoperable and gasoline flooding MUST occur.

Sure filters help, but.
I'm simply saying that if two identical boats were being considered, one gas, one diesel, then the diesel equipped boat is worth thousands more than the gas for multiple reasons.
Not my humble opinion. More than qualified.

Hi Brianlara,

As I mentioned in my first reply, there is absolutely no argument that diesel is safer and in many ways better than gasoline as a fuel for boats. I am not a professional mechanic and will bow to your expertise in this area regarding the potential causes of leaks in a gas engine from the carbs. I will however say that in my years of boating I have not seen this as a common problem and, in fact, cannot remember a case in a boat engine of this occurring. Small engines in lawn mowers, chain saws, etc yes.

Do I prefer diesel? Yes without a doubt. It's safer, diesel engines generally more reliable and easier to work on, better mileage, last longer and more. But if I was in the market for a cheap boat and found a deal on one with an Atomic 4 I wouldn't turn my back.

a64pilot 05-12-2016 08:01

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Way back when I was a contract welder in the US oilfield, until it collapsed about 1980.
I have two Rocna's, a 25 and a 40, I guarantee you that I could weld one up in way less than a day. If you have the equipment and expertise, why not?
Now I don't have the time or the equipment anymore, so I bought mine, but I'm the type that if I had the time I would likely enjoy making my own. I feel sure they are just plate steel, I would make the curve with a big Rosebud and a log with a sledge.
My Father would have used his Forge, but I never did Blacksmithing.

Gas boats? Last Sportfisherman was a 36' boat with twin 454's, never had a problem with them, did religiously run the blowers for 5 min before starting, and did have fume detectors, they were carburated too. The generator was gas too, only problem we had was feeding the things, they were thirsty buggers.
Over the last 50 or more years there have been tens of thousands of gas boats, I bet nearly all boats were gas in the 50's?

It's like propane, dangerous as the Devil, but acknowledge the danger, respect it and keep up with maintenance and very unlikely you will have a problem, the statistics just don't show it to be that big a danger

Pete7 05-12-2016 08:22

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
I guess the easiest of the new anchors to make would be a copy of the Bugel anchor.

New Generation Anchors: Bugel, Manson, Rocna, and Spade

Elie 05-12-2016 09:23

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
In my opinion, gasoline engines on sailboats are not such a bad idea: Much lighter, easy to fix, and much less expansives parts, when needed. In fact most of the motors cruisers under 40 ft are powered by lighty modified gas engines. A good and secure installation is off course mandatory, with a good forced ventillation of engine room, alarm for explosives fumes. I was thinking of a marinazed modern 4 cycle motorcycle engine for a catamaran: Light weight, direct fuel injection, sump pump, powerfull, and less expansive ...

UNCIVILIZED 05-12-2016 09:43

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Most of the gear that you see discussed is want based, & most often the desire from it comes from advertising & commercialism. In order to get more of an idea as to what's truly need, look at boats of a few decades, or half a century (or more) ago. As a ship's systems needn't be complex, nor expensive.

A good rig, a good rudder, self steering, solid sails, & good ground tackle. Plus decent, simple nav gear pretty much covers it. Much of the so called "must have" gear is touted as such by those who will to profit from it. That, & to some degree, those who'd be well served by learning better seamanship, instead of attempting to compensate for lesser amounts of same via their wallets. And yep, I know, that comment may cause me to get flamed on a bit :whistling:

My neighbor of 20-something years ago had a DIY Bruce copy that she'd used all over the world without issue. It was one they'd made when building the (steel) boat. And I've been tempted to do something similar myself, at least in order to have a good sized Northill on hand. But...

The catch about anchors is that you can find good used & new ones for $2-3/lb. Unless you absolutely "must" have one of the latest designs. But otherwise, anchors are cheap. Even used Fortresses; especially when you figure in the fact that they're "endlessly new", given the warranty. So that unless you can get a DIY anchor galvanized gratis, then fiscally speaking, purchasing an anchor may make the most sense. Even if it means paying 1/2-2/3 new cost for a used new gen anchor. Since there are always people looking to switch to a different sized hook, & wanting to sell their current (old) one.

As to engine choices, much of it has been covered. And while I'd prefer a diesel (more so for long range crusing), I had an Atomic-4 for half a decade. With my only issue with it being that I didn't own a dwell meter, nor know how to operate one, until the time I replaced the points. Which, from an ease of maintenance standpoint, a diesel is a bit easier. But gas engines have been around on boats for a number of generations now. With the issues for keeping them safe being known ones.

Edit: I think that with gasoline engines, a large percentage of the incidents with them stem from poor refueling practices. Something perhaps worth looking into, the statistics on said engines & where the dangers truly lay, I mean.

um saudade 05-12-2016 10:50

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
You need two things for a gasoline fume explosion: fuel and spark. Yes, you need to be very careful with fuel issues but you must be even more careful with insuring the integrity of the components that need to be explosion proof.

I see many aspects to building or re-building of gear. Just to start, you need to have the ability, you need to have the tools and you need to have the time.

All exist on a sliding scale. We may have the ability to weld but do we have the ability to weld stainless or aluminum? Anyone who works with their hands knows there is always another tool you need in the shop. The straight edge and the file are replaced by the milling machine, etc. as we look for higher levels of accuracy and fit, for example. Many projects require specialty tools and whether you purchase or fabricate, can you justify it? I made up a set of dies for crimping lifeline connectors. Hard to justify if you are only doing one set of lifelines and you canít do it at all without milling equipment and the shop press sitting in the corner ready to do the work.

A big consideration for many of us is the challenge of doing what most others canít do and the personal satisfaction that comes from being able to do quality work that not only creates new but maintains the old and keeps them in good shape for continued service.

Then we come to the aspect of re-engineering. There is not a boat out there with everything done right. We may see design flaws and wish to change them, but bringing plans for new ideas to the welding or machine shop can get very expensive.

I believe the more work you do yourself and the deeper you dive into the workings of everything on your boat, the more you prepare yourself for sailing. Once over the horizon there is no SeaTow. You need the tools, the spare parts and the technical expertise to fix it yourself.

jeepbluetj 05-12-2016 11:35

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Diesel is safer than gas.

According to wikipedia, WRT the atomic 4: "Over 40,000 of the engines were produced during that time, with an estimated 20,000 still in use today."

Don't think many of the boats blew up. Almost all the boats on my dock are gas powered (I'm the only inboard gas powered sailboat though). Most power cruisers, sport fishers, etc.. don't blow up either. The A4 has a scavange tube that mitigates the flooding problem a bit. And any proper marine installation has spark-arrested starter and alternator.

Propane is as dangerous as gasoline and folks seem to be fine with that.

Just be sane: Shut off the fuel when the boat isn't being used. Check for leaks often. Use good fuel filters. Smell for gas every time before start, and use the blower (and leave it on).

If the needle valve goes bad but you have the fuel shut off, the lower part of the carb will be filled with gas - with a decent O ring on the spark arrester it won't leak into the bilge - but you'd definitely smell it when opening up the boat.

All things A4 - moyermarine.com

Biggest problem I have with my gas powered sailboat is it's limited range. A diesel version of the same boat gets 2x range.

Tricolor 05-12-2016 11:42

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
3 Attachment(s)
I made some drawings for my new DIY 20 kg Anchor..

Cormorant 05-12-2016 11:52

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Keep in mind the Rocna "bent shank" scandal of 5 years ago. A batch was made with mild steel shank instead of Bisplate 80 high-tensile steel, and some of those shanks bent like wet noodles under a side-load. And you can't just double the thickness of a mild steel shank, as it throws the balance off and the tip won't set properly. It does get tricky. . . .

Tricolor 05-12-2016 12:03

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Cormorant (Post 2273205)
Keep in mind the Rocna "bent shank" scandal of 5 years ago. A batch was made with mild steel shank instead of Bisplate 80 high-tensile steel, and some of those shanks bent like wet noodles under a side-load. And you can't just double the thickness of a mild steel shank, as it throws the balance off and the tip won't set properly. It does get tricky. . . .

I know about material choices and balance, i am a retired Marine Engineer. BTW, the little green dot is the center of gravity..

scottorious 05-12-2016 12:10

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Awesome posts everyone. I really appreciate the input. This is my first year with a boat and I guess this is true with all hobbies that people love getting all the shiny bits because it gives the impression that it will improve their sailing ability. It's hard to see between the needs and the wants as a newbie. I saw it in the hunting community a lot. People buying the most advanced bows and shotguns hoping it would improve their lack of real shooting skill. As I learn more about boats I am beginning to see more clearly that my old 67 Cal 34 is in fact a splendid boat.

I love those anchor drawings! Well done! I'd like to see some pictures of it completed.

Is there a community of marine electronics homebuilders anywhere?

I admit this might be crazy but what about life rafts? Anyone built or use a suitable alternative that doesn't cost thousands to sit on deck without the confidence that it really will inflate? Even the Bay of Green Bay gets decently lumpy on occasion and I always wonder what I'll do in the worst case scenario. This is embarrassing to say but my ditch plan currently consists of wearing a quality life jacket and a pool noodle with some flippers to attempt to swim to shore. That sounds like a joke but it seems better than bobbing around in the cold water.

rwidman 05-12-2016 12:20

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by yalnud (Post 2272599)
Well sir. I am a journeyman fabricator and welder and i am here to tell you that i can and i absolutely intend to cut up and weld my own anchor. Its not very hard to walk down the docks and measure uo a roccna and re-create it. Ive checked pricing on stainless and i can do a 45# roccna for about 300 bucks. I think if your handy. It an absolutely viable savings.

If you are truly that good of a fabricator, you should be able to put your skills to work for pay and make enough to buy a tried and true commercial anchor in less time than it would take to make one.

jheldatksuedu 05-12-2016 12:29

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
I think anchor design is not that hard, I think the holding power of an anchor is much more determined by the bottom consistency than anything else, some anchors work great in one but not another. I have a good collection of the different anchor designs and intend to spend some time comparing them in different situations. One interesting one that I have come across is called a Barnacle, it should work much like a Danforth, but it is much stronger being cast instead of welded plate. I like the way it stores in a small volume. I suspect that much more thought goes into setting and resetting design than holding. Anchoring and setting in rock stubble is probably the real test of an anchor.

Ramona 05-12-2016 14:23

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
The new generation anchors may look different but they all have almost the same dimensions and angles. Decide what size and style you need, whether it is to live on a bow roller or fit in a deck well. A roll bar anchor may not fit. Most manufacturers have templates available for prospective buyers to make wooden versions to test if they suit the buyers boat. If you make paper cutouts you can overlay various models from different manufacturers to compare dimensions and angles. Then if you want you can make very similar anchors yourself out of a material of your choice. If your any good at welding there is no problem equaling the bought product that is built down to a price.
I would suggest SS but don't make it too attractive, SS anchors are the most common item stolen off boats. The secret to anchor performance with the new generation anchors is weighted tips, sharp point and sharp leading edge. File that leading edge sharp!

zstine 05-12-2016 15:13

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
seachoice plow anchor on Amazon. A 35lb for you would be $111 shipped to your door. If your time has any value to you, I doubt you could build and galvanize one for less. I bought the 44lb 4 years ago and it has performed well.. Only very minor rust at the tip where it digs in... I DIY a solar arch & Bimini frame, cabinets ... All comes down to a time vs money question.

https://www.amazon.com/Seachoice-Plo...low&th=1&psc=1

Tricolor 05-12-2016 15:24

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ramona (Post 2273342)
The new generation anchors may look different but they all have almost the same dimensions and angles. Decide what size and style you need, whether it is to live on a bow roller or fit in a deck well. A roll bar anchor may not fit. Most manufacturers have templates available for prospective buyers to make wooden versions to test if they suit the buyers boat. If you make paper cutouts you can overlay various models from different manufacturers to compare dimensions and angles. Then if you want you can make very similar anchors yourself out of a material of your choice. If your any good at welding there is no problem equaling the bought product that is built down to a price.
I would suggest SS but don't make it too attractive, SS anchors are the most common item stolen off boats. The secret to anchor performance with the new generation anchors is weighted tips, sharp point and sharp leading edge. File that leading edge sharp!

SS is the worst material to choose for an anchor... just look at the material specs..

PLS use the search function when you look for an anchor!!!

charliehows 05-12-2016 15:29

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Gasoline engines were very common on small sailboats earlier in the C20 – but they are certainly more unreliable and ill-suited to marine use than diesels and there are definitely danger issues with the holding of large volumes of gasoline aboard – my diesel tank is one step away from my stove, i'd not like to have to say the same for a gasoline tank...as for welding up an anchor – why not, but its one thing where the amount of work and material is probably more than just buying a sufficiently effective mass produced job. Given that you're asking this question, you may not have the design skills to tackle one of the premium modern design anchors where you could make a bit of a saving – much as i hate to admit it, a fair bit of research has gone into the design and fabrication of modern anchors.

brianlara 3 05-12-2016 15:50

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
My bow anchor is a 35lb Manson Supreme & in Australia I paid US $370 for it.
Ashore in Sydney where I often am, I have free & unfettered access to all the materials (316 or HT) and to the rolling, welding and e/plating equipment needed to make anything imaginable. And i could have made a copy manson rather than have spent the money.
But I just don't see the point. I proved to myself and others, decades ago, that I could do it so why bother.
Sure, people build their own boats and fit them out, great why not, but those people NEED to buy windlasses, sheet winches, circuit breakers, light fittings, blowers ...an endless list, chain, so why bother making anchors? Beats me.
Because of 'economies of scale' & and bulk shipping, people in the US are able to buy stuff really cheaply. If you want to know how cheap your stuff is go Whitworths.com.au website, do the conversion rates.

scottorious 05-12-2016 15:58

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
I think I was asking more from a standpoint of is anyone doing it? If not, why aren't they? I admit that I don't have the ability to try to reinvent a better anchor but I certainly can measure an existing anchor and copy it. I do value my time but if I can learn something and improve my skills in the process I call that a worthwhile venture. I would rather be in the garage grinding and welding than inside watching television anyway.

brianlara 3 05-12-2016 16:02

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by zstine (Post 2273386)
seachoice plow anchor on Amazon. A 35lb for you would be $111 shipped to your door. If your time has any value to you, I doubt you could build and galvanize one for less. I bought the 44lb 4 years ago and it has performed well.. Only very minor rust at the tip where it digs in... I DIY a solar arch & Bimini frame, cabinets ... All comes down to a time vs money question.

https://www.amazon.com/Seachoice-Plo...low&th=1&psc=1

I looked at that seachoice plow. You can count on it being like a Lewmar Delta, notorious for pulling in soft mud.
Knew a guy had a delta as big as a house on his 55ft Schoinning cat. Dragged two miles one night while he sleptin Darwin. Mine did the same, different place. In mud plows are shocking bloody things. Sorry for bit of thread drift but if you need no dramas buy a Rocna or Manson, Spade etc.


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