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scottorious 05-12-2016 12:10

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Awesome posts everyone. I really appreciate the input. This is my first year with a boat and I guess this is true with all hobbies that people love getting all the shiny bits because it gives the impression that it will improve their sailing ability. It's hard to see between the needs and the wants as a newbie. I saw it in the hunting community a lot. People buying the most advanced bows and shotguns hoping it would improve their lack of real shooting skill. As I learn more about boats I am beginning to see more clearly that my old 67 Cal 34 is in fact a splendid boat.

I love those anchor drawings! Well done! I'd like to see some pictures of it completed.

Is there a community of marine electronics homebuilders anywhere?

I admit this might be crazy but what about life rafts? Anyone built or use a suitable alternative that doesn't cost thousands to sit on deck without the confidence that it really will inflate? Even the Bay of Green Bay gets decently lumpy on occasion and I always wonder what I'll do in the worst case scenario. This is embarrassing to say but my ditch plan currently consists of wearing a quality life jacket and a pool noodle with some flippers to attempt to swim to shore. That sounds like a joke but it seems better than bobbing around in the cold water.

rwidman 05-12-2016 12:20

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by yalnud (Post 2272599)
Well sir. I am a journeyman fabricator and welder and i am here to tell you that i can and i absolutely intend to cut up and weld my own anchor. Its not very hard to walk down the docks and measure uo a roccna and re-create it. Ive checked pricing on stainless and i can do a 45# roccna for about 300 bucks. I think if your handy. It an absolutely viable savings.

If you are truly that good of a fabricator, you should be able to put your skills to work for pay and make enough to buy a tried and true commercial anchor in less time than it would take to make one.

jheldatksuedu 05-12-2016 12:29

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
I think anchor design is not that hard, I think the holding power of an anchor is much more determined by the bottom consistency than anything else, some anchors work great in one but not another. I have a good collection of the different anchor designs and intend to spend some time comparing them in different situations. One interesting one that I have come across is called a Barnacle, it should work much like a Danforth, but it is much stronger being cast instead of welded plate. I like the way it stores in a small volume. I suspect that much more thought goes into setting and resetting design than holding. Anchoring and setting in rock stubble is probably the real test of an anchor.

Ramona 05-12-2016 14:23

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
The new generation anchors may look different but they all have almost the same dimensions and angles. Decide what size and style you need, whether it is to live on a bow roller or fit in a deck well. A roll bar anchor may not fit. Most manufacturers have templates available for prospective buyers to make wooden versions to test if they suit the buyers boat. If you make paper cutouts you can overlay various models from different manufacturers to compare dimensions and angles. Then if you want you can make very similar anchors yourself out of a material of your choice. If your any good at welding there is no problem equaling the bought product that is built down to a price.
I would suggest SS but don't make it too attractive, SS anchors are the most common item stolen off boats. The secret to anchor performance with the new generation anchors is weighted tips, sharp point and sharp leading edge. File that leading edge sharp!

zstine 05-12-2016 15:13

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
seachoice plow anchor on Amazon. A 35lb for you would be $111 shipped to your door. If your time has any value to you, I doubt you could build and galvanize one for less. I bought the 44lb 4 years ago and it has performed well.. Only very minor rust at the tip where it digs in... I DIY a solar arch & Bimini frame, cabinets ... All comes down to a time vs money question.

https://www.amazon.com/Seachoice-Plo...low&th=1&psc=1

Tricolor 05-12-2016 15:24

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ramona (Post 2273342)
The new generation anchors may look different but they all have almost the same dimensions and angles. Decide what size and style you need, whether it is to live on a bow roller or fit in a deck well. A roll bar anchor may not fit. Most manufacturers have templates available for prospective buyers to make wooden versions to test if they suit the buyers boat. If you make paper cutouts you can overlay various models from different manufacturers to compare dimensions and angles. Then if you want you can make very similar anchors yourself out of a material of your choice. If your any good at welding there is no problem equaling the bought product that is built down to a price.
I would suggest SS but don't make it too attractive, SS anchors are the most common item stolen off boats. The secret to anchor performance with the new generation anchors is weighted tips, sharp point and sharp leading edge. File that leading edge sharp!

SS is the worst material to choose for an anchor... just look at the material specs..

PLS use the search function when you look for an anchor!!!

charliehows 05-12-2016 15:29

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Gasoline engines were very common on small sailboats earlier in the C20 – but they are certainly more unreliable and ill-suited to marine use than diesels and there are definitely danger issues with the holding of large volumes of gasoline aboard – my diesel tank is one step away from my stove, i'd not like to have to say the same for a gasoline tank...as for welding up an anchor – why not, but its one thing where the amount of work and material is probably more than just buying a sufficiently effective mass produced job. Given that you're asking this question, you may not have the design skills to tackle one of the premium modern design anchors where you could make a bit of a saving – much as i hate to admit it, a fair bit of research has gone into the design and fabrication of modern anchors.

brianlara 3 05-12-2016 15:50

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
My bow anchor is a 35lb Manson Supreme & in Australia I paid US $370 for it.
Ashore in Sydney where I often am, I have free & unfettered access to all the materials (316 or HT) and to the rolling, welding and e/plating equipment needed to make anything imaginable. And i could have made a copy manson rather than have spent the money.
But I just don't see the point. I proved to myself and others, decades ago, that I could do it so why bother.
Sure, people build their own boats and fit them out, great why not, but those people NEED to buy windlasses, sheet winches, circuit breakers, light fittings, blowers ...an endless list, chain, so why bother making anchors? Beats me.
Because of 'economies of scale' & and bulk shipping, people in the US are able to buy stuff really cheaply. If you want to know how cheap your stuff is go Whitworths.com.au website, do the conversion rates.

scottorious 05-12-2016 15:58

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
I think I was asking more from a standpoint of is anyone doing it? If not, why aren't they? I admit that I don't have the ability to try to reinvent a better anchor but I certainly can measure an existing anchor and copy it. I do value my time but if I can learn something and improve my skills in the process I call that a worthwhile venture. I would rather be in the garage grinding and welding than inside watching television anyway.

brianlara 3 05-12-2016 16:02

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by zstine (Post 2273386)
seachoice plow anchor on Amazon. A 35lb for you would be $111 shipped to your door. If your time has any value to you, I doubt you could build and galvanize one for less. I bought the 44lb 4 years ago and it has performed well.. Only very minor rust at the tip where it digs in... I DIY a solar arch & Bimini frame, cabinets ... All comes down to a time vs money question.

https://www.amazon.com/Seachoice-Plo...low&th=1&psc=1

I looked at that seachoice plow. You can count on it being like a Lewmar Delta, notorious for pulling in soft mud.
Knew a guy had a delta as big as a house on his 55ft Schoinning cat. Dragged two miles one night while he sleptin Darwin. Mine did the same, different place. In mud plows are shocking bloody things. Sorry for bit of thread drift but if you need no dramas buy a Rocna or Manson, Spade etc.

scottorious 05-12-2016 16:10

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
I think you're right Brianlara, it does seem silly to someone that could afford to buy whatever they need. While I'm not destitute I certainly wouldn't mind saving money where I can. I do get a satisfaction out of building things instead of just buying.

Pauls 05-12-2016 16:43

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Go ahead and build an anchor (or 3). By all means study existing anchors, make detailed measurements and copy the design that you find best for your needs. The best anchors are the end result of a lot of trial and error. Don't reinvent the wheel.

When you make one, might as well make more than one. An extra anchor is a good thing to have. And, as you know, half the time spent is in set ups, patterning, etc.

I made my own anchor, a copy of a large Rocna. It's 160 lbs. Made from scrap steel, it cost nothing except a few dollars for welding rod and the cost to galvanize it.

By all means do NOT make your anchor from stainless. Stainless is a poor metal underwater. Galvanized steel is a longer lived and more reliable material.

And yes, in general there are a great number of things on a yacht that you can make for yourself better and cheaper than the marine store stuff. "Marine" is generally way overpriced, and much that is sold for yacht use can be made stronger and more reliably by using industrial items and/or making them yourself.

seabreez 05-12-2016 16:48

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by yalnud (Post 2272599)
Well sir. I am a journeyman fabricator and welder and i am here to tell you that i can and i absolutely intend to cut up and weld my own anchor. Its not very hard to walk down the docks and measure uo a roccna and re-create it. Ive checked pricing on stainless and i can do a 45# roccna for about 300 bucks. I think if your handy. It an absolutely viable savings.

Some times saving a few bucks on something that is a safety item is not worth it. Choose your battles and save money on other things and if your are a do it yourself person then do it. I agree that if you have the skills and the expertise then do it. You will pay in the long term on items that you are not knowledgeable. Do not cheap out safety for a few bucks... (my opinion)...

crazyoldboatguy 05-12-2016 17:16

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
I've had an A4 in the family boat since 1962. No problems. A very common engine. With good care it will last the life of the boat.

It's rather simple - pay attention, run your blower before starting the engine and keep up maintenance. The beef about gas engines is hyped way beyond rational thinking. IMHO of course.

brianlara 3 05-12-2016 17:53

Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things
 
Thing is COBG, no diesel powered boat is likely to have a catastrophic fire situation unless caused by propane leaks.
Whereas in the world wide media we from time to time hear of gas powered boats catching fire (at best). Gasoline is, pound for pound, more volatile than tnt. And, being liquid and highly evaporative, it is insidious to say the least.
Stand at a truck stop and watch drivers fill their tanks. The smokers will be smoking because there is no risk.
Many times I've demonstrated to students the result of throwing a lighted match into a can of diesel fuel....nothing happens.
The "hype" you talked about. JUST WHY WOULD the hype exist if there wasn't significantly greater risk of fire from gas than diesel.
I'm wondering just how many carburettors you have seen flooding (onto hot exhaust manifolds in the presence of multiple spark sources) or fuel pumps squirting gas everywhere because a diaphragm decided that it was time to split.
I stated in an earlier post that I'd take a gas powered boat aroung the world but I'd have precautions in place, and I don't mean vapour detectors or blowers both of which are secondary measures.
Just one old mans professional opinion.


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