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-   -   Do boom brakes work? (https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f47/do-boom-brakes-work-163833.html)

Dr. Sea 01-04-2016 18:28

Do boom brakes work?
 
I have heard conflicting views on the value a a boom brake vs. a preventer. Some people say that a boom brake doesn't soften a crash jibe enough to be worthwhile. I suppose that might depend on the brand and design of the boom brake. Does anyone have experience with a boom brake that they think is great?

Mike OReilly 01-04-2016 18:49

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
I've yet to rig our boom brake (just acquired), but to my understanding, they two are not identical in function. I plan to install our brake, but I will definitely continue to rig the preventer.

A brake helps control and soften a jybe, but it won't prevent one.

Matt Johnson 01-04-2016 19:08

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
We love ours (walder), but on long passages still use a preventer too. We'll typically just come through the wind on the other tack, let the main backwind, and have the boom swing over itself.

I'm not sure there is a production brake that would work with your mainsail size.

jackdale 01-04-2016 20:41

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Dr. Sea (Post 2087278)
I have heard conflicting views on the value a a boom brake vs. a preventer. Some people say that a boom brake doesn't soften a crash jibe enough to be worthwhile. I suppose that might depend on the brand and design of the boom brake. Does anyone have experience with a boom brake that they think is great?

Dutchman Boom Brake

I have used it, I like it.

Kenomac 01-04-2016 21:13

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
We used a Dutchman boom brake on our Hunter and it worked great. I just wish there had been a way to rig it on our Oyster.

jackdale 01-04-2016 21:16

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kenomac (Post 2087359)
We used a Dutchman boom brake on our Hunter and it worked great. I just wish there had been a way to rig it on our Oyster.

Can you install padeyes with backing plates on the coach roof?

frozenhawaiian 01-04-2016 21:50

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
well I think you're missing the point that boom brakes and preventers are very different things and serve different purposes. a boom brake is to soften the impact of a crash jibe, but you gotten understand that while they do soften the impact they don't take all the force out of a crash jibe. A preventer on the other hand keeps the boom from jibing all together, so you have the safety factor of the boom not accidentally jibing and taking someone out but make no mistake if you "jibe" with a preventer rigged, you now have a backed mainsail winged all the way out and it will absolutely spin your boat out of control.

Kenomac 02-04-2016 03:15

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by jackdale (Post 2087360)
Can you install padeyes with backing plates on the coach roof?

That's a good idea, but I already sold my Dutchman two weeks ago to a lucky CF member. My problem was more due to the Duchman causing chafe with the main sheet as it hung off the boom. Your way would have probably worked.

Keep the good ideas coming.

Ken

Snowpetrel 02-04-2016 03:44

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
I've been pretty impressed with most of the boom brakes I've used on smaller boats. With a bit of tweeking ive been able to control a gybe quite well, and even get them to sort of work as a preventer. Though I still lile to rig a proper preventer on long offshore runs.

It does take a fair bit of fiddling with wraps and tension to get them working properly.

I like to be able to tension down on both sides, not just one side like they normally show.

delmarrey 02-04-2016 03:51

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
I have a Dutchman but would now prefer the Walder. Even though, it has saved my ass a few times and the inexperienced crew as well! But I still use the preventer to keep out the backlash of downwind sailing.

It's just a controller, not a preventer. The bigger the boat, the more important.

jackdale 02-04-2016 06:56

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
If you are going run a preventer ensure that it goes from the boom end to a block on the foredeck to a cleat / sheet stopper in the cockpit. A boom vang tacked to a toe rail is just one very bad idea. It is hard on the boom and the toe rail.

Neither a boom brake or a preventer stops a an accidental jibe from occurring. One slows the jibe down; the other stops the the boom from flying across the cockpit, you end up hove-to.

rognvald 02-04-2016 09:00

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
To me, a boom brake and a preventer are two different concepts. A boom brake "controls" a planned tack/jibe while a preventer is rigged to prevent an accidental tack/jibe. We do use a boom preventer when running downwind in sloppy conditions or light/inconsistent winds but see no use for a boom brake as we implement controlled tacks/jibes with our mainsheet, in strong conditions, from the safety of our cockpit. Although this has been a successful practice on a 34', light/medium displacement boat, it may not be practicable on larger, heavy-displacement vessels. Good luck and safe sailing.

bcboomer 02-04-2016 09:28

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
[QUOTE=delmarrey;2087495]I have a Dutchman but would now prefer the Walder.


Why would you prefer the Walder?

zboss 02-04-2016 09:35

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
We love our Wichard Gyb’Easy.

We run an end to a block and tackle by the cockpit so we can tighten it easily. We can make it work more like a preventer (we can make it tight enough the boom won't swing at all but of course it is then also acting like a boom vang by pulling the boom down) or to operate like a normal boom brake right from the cockpit. Setting the tension somewhere in between allows us to make slow or fast jibes without having to change the setting on the brake itself.

Except for the block and tackle - which isn't necessary for operation, there are no moving parts.

Adrian NAMT 02-04-2016 09:46

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
I have a Wichard "Gybeasy". It works well to control planned and unplanned gybes.

For night sailing without a preventer, regardless of the conditions, I put it on its third setting making it safer to use than a preventer.

After an accidental gybe, when using the preventer, it is a big help to get the boom over and keep the boat under control by letting you ease, rather than release the preventer.

But, you need to plan to use both, sometimes together.

deblen 02-04-2016 11:05

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
Has anyone tried the Capt Don ?
Boat Parts : Capt. Don Boom Brake

Mike OReilly 02-04-2016 12:53

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by deblen (Post 2087764)
Has anyone tried the Capt Don ?
Boat Parts : Capt. Don Boom Brake

I have one (the SS version). Haven't yet installed it though. That's a project for this season.

timbenner 02-04-2016 13:28

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by zboss (Post 2087703)
We love our Wichard Gyb’Easy.

We run an end to a block and tackle by the cockpit so we can tighten it easily. We can make it work more like a preventer (we can make it tight enough the boom won't swing at all but of course it is then also acting like a boom vang by pulling the boom down) or to operate like a normal boom brake right from the cockpit. Setting the tension somewhere in between allows us to make slow or fast jibes without having to change the setting on the brake itself.

Except for the block and tackle - which isn't necessary for operation, there are no moving parts.

I've been using a Gybe easy for over 5 years as well. I highly recommend it. It's all done through friction. So you can adjust it anyway you want it.

hoppy 02-04-2016 13:38

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
I have the walder boom brake. I rigged it with a 4:1 purchase so that it is very easy to tension it from the helms with one hand. It allows me to easily reduce he tension to assist the gybe in lighter winds and quickly tension up again to slow it down or "lock it off".

I don't see the need for a preventer as when it is set for the conditions, it slows the boom down in the situation where you accidentally gybe without doing a crash gybe. After all, it's not the gybe that causes problem, it the speed of the boom and the "crash" at the end that causes the damage.

damir s 02-04-2016 13:53

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
I have Walder boombrake 203 C on SUNSHINE 38 and i am satisfied with it.

https://s5.postimg.org/6gk8wnhmr/IMAG0688.jpg

nigel1 02-04-2016 14:33

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
A test/review of the Witchard and Walder systems can be found here
Tested: boom brakes and preventers – Yachting World

Personally, I use a climbing descender in the same application as the Witchard Gyb'Easy. It's only used to control the boom swing during a gybe in up to moderation conditions. Single handing, it does help.

deepwaterport 02-04-2016 14:34

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
Skippered a cat in ARC a few years ago. When we got in to St Lucia, and chatted to crew over a beer or two, I found out that 5 boats had damaged their booms.
ALL had boom brakes/ preventers going to middle of boom. Booms buckled/bent here, while end of boom whiplashed.
I would always rig preventer to END of boom. Cheers.

damir s 02-04-2016 14:58

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
For me is important that protect my head, and this is important. I can adjust power of swinging and speed, lso protecting boom. Walder boom brake is expencive but when you are hit by boom this cost nothing!
Safety first!!!!!!

phantomracer 02-04-2016 15:11

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
Have the dutchman. love it.

had the gybe easy. couldn't find a way to feather it as fine as the dutchman. Once the dutchman is dialed in, it is great.

CdS2 Roland 04-04-2016 05:00

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
Hello,
I'am using a Walder, great. But you have learn how to use it and follow the instructions. After that you will be able to tack down Wind, looking only to your genoa.
(Sorry if my English is not so good.. I'am swiss french speaking sailor)

Have a good day.

gjordan 04-04-2016 09:56

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
I know that Walder had 2 and possibly 3 different sizes of boom brake. I bought one used and it turned out to be the size I needed, but make sure of what size you are buying. ____Grant.

delmarrey 04-04-2016 17:42

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
[QUOTE=bcboomer;2087699]
Quote:

Originally Posted by delmarrey (Post 2087495)
I have a Dutchman but would now prefer the Walder.


Why would you prefer the Walder?

If you look at the Walder it has a couple metal loops that the line passes thru. That keeps it from rocking side to side a lot less then the Dutchman. Without them the Dutchman has a bit of a backlash in a downwind situation.

Plus the line is closer to the attachment which makes for less backlash. And Walders come in larger sizes.

https://www.boom-brake-walder.com/mod...epage_logo.jpg

cortezsailor 05-04-2016 19:25

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
I don't think theirs any proper substitute for a properly rigged preventer system. I find them easier, less lines , and close to fail proof except for the worst conditions or human error of course . If you have an Oyster 55 and want to prevent possible damage from an accidental jibe I'd skip the boom brake


Sent from my iPad using Cruisers Sailing Forum

DRS 05-04-2016 20:13

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
1 Attachment(s)
Never leave home without it. But then again you would not want this boom swinging about out of control.

Look familiar jackdale?

jackdale 05-04-2016 20:24

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by DRS (Post 2090449)
Never leave home without it. But then again you would not want this boom swinging about out of control.

Look familiar jackdale?

Stray Cat?

hpeer 06-04-2016 06:40

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
We have the large Dutchman on the 44' boat. I find it works well. I have it come back to a secondary winch for tension adjustment. It's a big help when single handing.

But also with new crew, in my case the Wife. Last year she got totally flustered and gybed a number of times. The brake really took the sting out of that learning experience. Not to mention my head. (Or did it thwart a well laid plan? )

On the 33 I have dual vangs going to the toe rails. The boat did not come with a vang or preventer. By using two vangs, one to each rail, I have both a vang and preventer set up, though not an end of boom arrangement.

Two different approaches, both work for me.

Michael Baker 08-04-2016 19:39

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
Hello- I have used my "Dutchman Boom Brake for years and love it. I am sailing a cutter rigged Freya, often times singlehanded or with rookie sailors. The brake eliminates the need to go forward and rig up a preventer line and so allows me to remain in the cockpit. Further if the shives are set with the appropriate resistance for current wind velocity and sail area the brake will allow the sail to slowly ease out to leeward in an unintentional jib and so prevent the back winding inherent if an un intentional jibe occurs with a preventer line rigged. Last the brake acts as a good boom crutch if employed with a topping lift and a secured main sheet.

All good!

I suggest you buy a Dutchman that is oversized for your tonnage and run it with triple purchase back to a cockpit cleat, unless of course you can run it directly to a winch.

Capt. Don 26-07-2016 09:13

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
Boom brakes do work. However they do need to be installed correctly and dialed in. It was mentioned they can brake booms and yes they can. Consider attaching your brake to a line that runs between the ends of the boom as it will then make all loads on the boom a compressive force and not a bending force.

I have put a lot of info on my web site including photos of the Vendee open 60 racing boats with lines between boom ends, videos and a spread sheet that can help optimize the placement on the boom.

Boom Brakes

Cheechako 26-07-2016 09:25

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
I only had one. I never could find the sweet spot for tension. But it did work to some extent.

Frontiersman 27-07-2016 12:11

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
I noticed funjohnson quoted their WALDER but were dubious as to whether there was a commercial option big enough for your boat. I actually have one which is far too big for my 36' Moody, if you're interested let me know.
Kind regards
John

thinwater 27-07-2016 13:23

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
Could someone explain when a boom brake is usefull? I sail a cat, and I don't see the application:

a. A preventer keep the boom from even trying to lift. Understand, use one when needed.

b. A boom break slows the passage. But since it is for planned jibes, why not...
1. Center the boom. Traveler up and sheet tight.
2. Jibe.
3. Brake the traveler as you let it down on the new tack.

Or do folks not like to center the boom first? Is it because of control problems in a breeze? Perhaps it is something cat sailors do not experience?

phantomracer 27-07-2016 13:43

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by thinwater (Post 2176343)
Could someone explain when a boom brake is usefull? I sail a cat, and I don't see the application:

a. A preventer keep the boom from even trying to lift. Understand, use one when needed.

b. A boom break slows the passage. But since it is for planned jibes, why not...
1. Center the boom. Traveler up and sheet tight.
2. Jibe.
3. Brake the traveler as you let it down on the new tack.

Or do folks not like to center the boom first? Is it because of control problems in a breeze? Perhaps it is something cat sailors do not experience?

I use it to prevent, or slow accidental jybes. yes for planned gybes, we try and do it the best way (rarely succeed, but we try!)

thinwater 25-08-2016 13:09

Re: Do boom brakes work?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by phantomracer (Post 2176355)
I use it to prevent, or slow accidental jybes. yes for planned gybes, we try and do it the best way (rarely succeed, but we try!)

A. On a catamaran, if you lock the traveler down at the end stop, it won't jibe unless you let it. Most cats don't have much sheet out, since we have to keep the main off the shrouds. I do use a preventer also sometimes (if I'm wing-an-wing). A boom brake used as a preventer is going to be FAR effective than just locking the traveler down and limiting the loose sheet.

B. I find I have to adjust the tension each time since wind has invariably changed Thus, it will probably not be set correctly to catch an accidental jibe. Yes, I suppose it will slow it a little.

Since my last post I spent a day playing with brakes (Gybe Easy and a figure-8) and I'm even less impressed than before. I'm stunned that any cat sailor would use one.
  • center the traveler
  • haul in the sheet
  • jibe
  • let it out
What I find very effective is climbing rope for traveler line. It really absorbs the slam, without impacting sail shape or trimming (only stretches during the slam). And no extra gear or side-deck clutter, which I hate.


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