Cruisers & Sailing Forums (https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/)
-   Our Community (https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f129/)
-   -   Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged) (https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f129/call-for-help-this-american-life-merged-125942.html)

Cuttyhunk 14-05-2014 05:24

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
[QUOTE=Andrew Troup;1540715]
Now that we know (thanks, Eric) that some anonymous clerk can mysteriously, capriciously and unilaterally terminate anyone's satphone comms from their desk in Poughkeepsie or wherever, that's clearly not a method of communication which should be built into our plans and expectations.

U/QUOTE]

Quote:

Originally Posted by LakeSuperior (Post 1540864)
I don't think we yet have an answer from RH as to the reason for the satphone cutoff. These phone are routinely used by 10's of 1000's of folks in all walks of life for emergency communications in dangerous backwaters of the planet. Arbitrarily cutting service does not seem to fit the business model.

I understood Eric to say that the company he used sent him a new SIM card for his satphone, but it was sent snail mail a couple of weeks before his departure, with no email alert to him to be looking for it or that his current card would be expiring shortly. He didn't receive the new SIM card before departure and didn't know the current one would expire. This is something I would expect for a land-based service where a sailor at sea would be highly unusual (for instance, a credit card renewal), but rather shocking to me for a satphone company.

This is the most important piece of information that I have gotten from this thread, honestly. I had already decided that an SSB will be higher on my list than a satphone, partly because I just like the nerdiness of radio. If I ever, for any reason, decide to buy a satphone, I will look up this thread for the name of the dealer RH used, just so I can avoid them. A mistake like this could put them out of business from the negative word of mouth...and maybe it should. Know your customer!

SmartMove 14-05-2014 05:37

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by LakeSuperior (Post 1540864)
I don't think we yet have an answer from RH as to the reason for the satphone cutoff. These phone are routinely used by 10's of 1000's of folks in all walks of life for emergency communications in dangerous backwaters of the planet. Arbitrarily cutting service does not seem to fit the business model.


I believe RH did answer that question a few pages back. While, as you say, "10s of 1000s" use these I'm not betting my life on ours (an Iridium) in an emergency. We have yet to be able to complete a call without the phone/service dropping the call. We have a less than 50% success of a position report email going through. In addition, ours sits in a cradle at the nav station that is connected to an externally mounted antenna, we have observed that 20-25% of the time it is searching for service here in the Caribbean -- very disturbing. I wouldn't think this would fit the business model either but this has been our experience for almost two years now. Meanwhile I have 800 minutes I can't seem to spend for any useful purpose.

Robyn

LakeSuperior 14-05-2014 05:45

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by SmartMove (Post 1540886)
I believe RH did answer that question a few pages back. While, as you say, "10s of 1000s" use these I'm not betting my life on ours (an Iridium) in an emergency. We have yet to be able to complete a call without the phone/service dropping the call. We have a less than 50% success of a position report email going through. In addition, ours sits in a cradle at the nav station that is connected to an externally mounted antenna, we have observed that 20-25% of the time it is searching for service here in the Caribbean -- very disturbing. I wouldn't think this would fit the business model either but this has been our experience for almost two years now. Meanwhile I have 800 minutes I can't seem to spend for any useful purpose.

Robyn

You have a problem with your antenna. Trust me on this one. I bet you only have one or two bars of signal. My Iridium 9555 with Nav Station install and external antenna never dropped a call or email in two years and 1500 minutes on our around the Atlantic trip including a 4 months in the Caribbean.

I also submit that have to know where you stand wrt to your SIM contract expiration date and minutes remaining before a crossing if it is a primary piece of gear. Similar to status of the life raft inspection date.

SmartMove 14-05-2014 05:47

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by LakeSuperior (Post 1540888)
You have a problem with your antenna. Trust me on this one. My Iridium 9555 with Nav Station install and external antenna never dropped a call or email in two years and 1500 minutes on our around the Atlantic trip including a 4 months in the Caribbean.


It is on the list of things to take a closer look at this summer. All of the dropped calls happen when I was using it on deck because I was so pissed off trying to use it inside. Maybe we have a bad phone. Thanks for the input.

Robyn

LakeSuperior 14-05-2014 05:51

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by SmartMove (Post 1540889)
It is on the list of things to take a closer look at this summer. All of the dropped calls happen when I was using it on deck because I was so pissed off trying to use it inside. Maybe we have a bad phone. Thanks for the input.

Robyn

It is a known problem that the internal antenna on the 9555 fail. Ours has failed. I now use it off the boat with an external antenna as I am too cheap to have it repaired. Beware when buying a used one.

bob_77903 14-05-2014 06:04

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MarkJ (Post 1540342)
There is no perfect time to take brats sailing. I advocate selling them along with the house.

***Disclaimer: I don't have children but I saw a post card of one once.


Mark

ROTFLMAO

smackdaddy 14-05-2014 06:43

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Andrew Troup (Post 1540701)
Even speaking as someone with a vested interest in persuading people that they should get me to make stuff for them

I can't think of any way I could make a case that if they drilled their own chainplates instead of having me make them, their boat would leak.

Well, I too can't see how drilling your own chainplate would make your boat leak. That's a pretty strange conclusion, dude.

I CAN see how things like using improper bar stock, installing it incorrectly, overlooking problems in the knee (it was an internal chainplate after all), etc. could lead to a failure which would then lead to your boat leaking.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andrew Troup (Post 1540701)
I simply don't get where you're coming from, with disparaging inferences about "home-made stuff".

Home-made stuff is great - until it fails. Again, the chainplates/knees might or might not have been the problem. But in analyzing a failure, one of the best places to start is by asking the questions "What changed?" These definitely changed. And something in that area failed (though I'm still unclear how if the damage was on the leeward side like RH says - strange).

RH, another thing that's still not lining up in your story is your insistence that you could have kept going, even with this damage, if it weren't for the baby. But then you mentions that you were losing power due to the water intrusion. Not horrible. But then you also mention the fact that you had barely enough water to drink because your watermaker was going down due to the power issues.

Another 3 weeks in the SP with no water? How were you going to do this?

minaret 14-05-2014 07:07

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by smackdaddy (Post 1540921)
Well, I too can't see how drilling your own chainplate would make your boat leak. That's a pretty strange conclusion, dude.

I CAN see how things like using improper bar stock, installing it incorrectly, overlooking problems in the knee (it was an internal chainplate after all), etc. could lead to a failure which would then lead to your boat leaking.



Home-made stuff is great - until it fails. Again, the chainplates/knees might or might not have been the problem. But in analyzing a failure, one of the best places to start is by asking the questions "What changed?" These definitely changed. And something in that area failed (though I'm still unclear how if the damage was on the leeward side like RH says - strange).

RH, another thing that's still not lining up in your story is your insistence that you could have kept going, even with this damage, if it weren't for the baby. But then you mentions that you were losing power due to the water intrusion. Not horrible. But then you also mention the fact that you had barely enough water to drink because your watermaker was going down due to the power issues.

Another 3 weeks in the SP with no water? How were you going to do this?




Small tankage strikes again. I can't imagine counting on water maker output when doing the math for a crossing. I wouldn't even count on a single tank.

Adodero 14-05-2014 07:10

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by minaret (Post 1540943)
Small tankage strikes again. I can't imagine counting on water maker output when doing the math for a crossing. I wouldn't even count on a single tank.

How was this handled pre-watermaker? Rainwater collection?

colemj 14-05-2014 07:29

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by minaret (Post 1540943)
Small tankage strikes again. I can't imagine counting on water maker output when doing the math for a crossing. I wouldn't even count on a single tank.

The watermaker threads are full of people claiming they regularly cross oceans using two squirts out of a spray bottle as their sole water usage. One poster claims they use 1L per day between 3 people! Eric himself posted how little water they needed, which was his reasoning for purchasing the 40gpd unit they had.

Seems to me that many people are crossing oceans with small tanks and no generation capability.

Mark

SV THIRD DAY 14-05-2014 07:36

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
What was the water tankage on Rebel Heart?

MarkJ 14-05-2014 07:42

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by colemj (Post 1540956)
The watermaker threads are full of people claiming they regularly cross oceans using two squirts out of a spray bottle as their sole water usage.


Yes, I agree and I do.
I have spray bottles at every water tap and the water pump is always off
You can have as many showers per day as you like on Sea Life.... As long as the fresh water comes out of the spray bottle. The wrist hurts at less than 1 litre!

:)

Mycroft 14-05-2014 07:44

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by SV THIRD DAY (Post 1540966)
What was the water tankage on Rebel Heart?

I believe it was 80 gallons.

captain58sailin 14-05-2014 07:50

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
One vessel I made that crossing with had 300 gallons of tankage for 6 people. This was pre water maker. We used fresh water for drinking only, and some of the cooking. My Brother being who he is scrubbed the decks every day with salt water and soap. Our skin got salt crusty and the beds were never truly dry. When ever a rain squall showed itself we would turn towards it, and once the salt was rinsed off the vessel and we had all taken fresh water showers, we would block the scuppers and open the water tank plug, and hang a 5 gallon bucket rigged with a garden hose attached to the bottom on our gooseneck, caught the rain off of the main sail, and let it run into the tank. 3 weeks for the crossing to Nuka Hiva from San Diego, we had plenty of water when we made landfall. Before we got there, we had reservations about quality of water in the islands, but found it was better than the water we got in San Diego. We didn't have GPS, Epirbs, only a Ham radio and SSB, VHF. A remarkable amount of water came down off of the main sail.

cwyckham 14-05-2014 08:41

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by LakeSuperior (Post 1540888)
You have a problem with your antenna. Trust me on this one. I bet you only have one or two bars of signal. My Iridium 9555 with Nav Station install and external antenna never dropped a call or email in two years and 1500 minutes on our around the Atlantic trip including a 4 months in the Caribbean.

I also submit that have to know where you stand wrt to your SIM contract expiration date and minutes remaining before a crossing if it is a primary piece of gear. Similar to status of the life raft inspection date.

If you listen to the interview or read the transcript, you will find that the contract did not expire. The service provider decided to change SIM card manufacturers and mailed out new SIM cards to all their subscribers a couple weeks before turning off all the current ones. They decided to use snail mail and not inform anybody by email (not that that would have helped all their customers in remote places much anyways).

Can't pin this one on Eric.

cwyckham 14-05-2014 08:46

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by smackdaddy (Post 1540921)
Home-made stuff is great - until it fails. Again, the chainplates/knees might or might not have been the problem. But in analyzing a failure, one of the best places to start is by asking the questions "What changed?" These definitely changed. And something in that area failed (though I'm still unclear how if the damage was on the leeward side like RH says - strange).

???

Your technique of analyzing a failure leaves a bit to be desired.

First, we don't know if the failure was anywhere near the chainplates that were replaced. I've never heard of a boat with chainplates near the starboard quarter.

Second, the knees were not replaced and the chainplates didn't fail.

Third, if you are to use the "what did I change last" theory of trouble shooting (which is a good one), then you have to know that the system was working before you changed something. This is great for engine diagnostics, but completely irrelevant for structural failure during an overload event at sea.

Azul 14-05-2014 08:48

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Does anyone ever rely on a 12 V water maker for their sole water supply? That would seem to be semi-suicidal. I had read that RH was conserving his electricity to run his radios and the water maker, but I assumed it was because it was making better quality drinking water than what was in the tankage.

However, if someone were to rely solely on a 12 V water maker, it would be good to have lots of fuel to charge the batteries, a small generator or an extra solar panel somewhere with a backup cheap charge regulator in case you decide to tie off your boom to the rail as a make shift preventer during a routine short squall while you are in the salon instead of at the helm because you can't sleep due to not having a crew you trust at the wheel. I'm not saying this actually happened- it would seem outlandishly improbable, but it would be one way to lose your stanchions and/or rails with attached solar panels during benign (ie not survival) conditions and also cause some significant leak inducing deck damage that is not easily explainable by dipping a boom.

Stanchions and rails are through bolted, I am still trying to figure out how RH lost his during the described event even if the solar panel acted as a diving plane as the frame of the panel would let go first. When I run into something like this that seems implausible, sometimes it is because important information is being withheld or disinformation is being dispersed. What actually pulled the stanchions or cockpit railings out?

smackdaddy 14-05-2014 09:26

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by cwyckham (Post 1540997)
???

Your technique of analyzing a failure leaves a bit to be desired.

First, we don't know if the failure was anywhere near the chainplates that were replaced. I've never heard of a boat with chainplates near the starboard quarter.

Hey, you gotta start somewhere bro.

So, where exactly is the "starboard quarter". I assume it's between the beam and bow? If so, what's behind the fender in this port-side photo of an HC36?

https://photos.inautia.com/barcosOcas...448484548x.JPG

Granted, these are external and RH says his were internal - but you get the idea.

Quote:

Originally Posted by cwyckham (Post 1540997)
?Second, the knees were not replaced and the chainplates didn't fail.

Okay the knees were not replaced. Were they confirmed to be sound - especially since there were cracks, leaks, and corrosion detected? And what evidence do you have that a chainplate didn't fail?

Quote:

Originally Posted by cwyckham (Post 1540997)
Third, if you are to use the "what did I change last" theory of trouble shooting (which is a good one), then you have to know that the system was working before you changed something. This is great for engine diagnostics, but completely irrelevant for structural failure during an overload event at sea.

What? Are you saying that if you'd been sailing along with a degrading rig (it was "working") - then you replaced part of the rig but didn't inspect/repair another part of it - this is irrelevant information in a structural failure?

As you say...

Quote:

Originally Posted by cwyckham (Post 1540997)
???

Your technique of analyzing a failure leaves a bit to be desired. .

The bottom line is there is a lot we don't know. There is a lot that RH himself doesn't seem to know. So the chainplate thing may be totally off-base. Even so, without reliable info, you just have to run down possibilities.

smackdaddy 14-05-2014 09:30

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Azul (Post 1540999)
Does anyone ever rely on a 12 V water maker for their sole water supply? That would seem to be semi-suicidal. I had read that RH was conserving his electricity to run his radios and the water maker, but I assumed it was because it was making better quality drinking water than what was in the tankage.

However, if someone were to rely solely on a 12 V water maker, it would be good to have lots of fuel to charge the batteries, a small generator or an extra solar panel somewhere with a backup cheap charge regulator in case you decide to tie off your boom to the rail as a make shift preventer during a routine short squall while you are in the salon instead of at the helm because you can't sleep due to not having a crew you trust at the wheel. I'm not saying this actually happened- it would seem outlandishly improbable, but it would be one way to lose your stanchions and/or rails with attached solar panels during benign (ie not survival) conditions and also cause some significant leak inducing deck damage that is not easily explainable by dipping a boom.

Stanchions and rails are through bolted, I am still trying to figure out how RH lost his during the described event even if the solar panel acted as a diving plane as the frame of the panel would let go first. When I run into something like this that seems implausible, sometimes it is because important information is being withheld or disinformation is being dispersed. What actually pulled the stanchions or cockpit railings out?

Bingo.

avb3 14-05-2014 09:57

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Let's try sticking with the topic and not get into personalities.

Consider this a moderator comment.

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Cruisers Sailing Forum mobile app

smackdaddy 14-05-2014 11:20

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Here is another detail that's not making sense. From the RH blog - here is the description of the deck construction:

Rebel Heart - History of HC 36's
(You should read this whole thing. Interesting stuff.)

Quote:

When the deck/coachroof section is removed from the mold, it has in place a nicely designed, slightly raised nonskid pattern embossed in the weather decks and the coach roof, complete with colored gelcoat.
But then RH says this in a post a couple of pages ago:

Quote:

Originally Posted by rebel heart (Post 1540393)
That Practical Sailor is incorrect. Our deck was teak over plywood over wood beams. There was no fiberglass in the cabintop either; it was plywood as well. The only fiberglass was in the hull itself; the rudder, spars, cockpit, and everything but the hull itself was wood.

I've seen a few official-sounding write up of boats that are a bit different from what you see when you're standing there looking at the material yourself.

So what happened to the glass/gelcoat layer on RH's boat? If it was indeed just screwed/caulked teak directly on plywood - that definitely sounds like rot heaven.

Was RH's particular boat not built to the same standards of the rest of these boats in his blog post? Did someone strip off this glass/gelcoat layer in the past? Etc. If this was indeed how his decks and house were constructed and finished, that was definitely a disaster waiting to happen.

This is important in since there was significant damage to the side-deck, hull-joint area in conditions that didn't seem to be epic. Rot would explain some of that I think.

captain58sailin 14-05-2014 11:26

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
On my vessel the starboard quarter is near the stern on the starboard side.

sailorboy1 14-05-2014 11:31

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
How do some of you keep track of all the posts on this thread in order to come up some petty comeback post????????????? I can not even separate key takeaways from crap on the thread anymore.

LakeSuperior 14-05-2014 11:33

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
The other question I had beside the SIM card situation was related to logistics. From earlier posts there seemed to be not much fuel carried, 30 or 40 gallons I thought I read as you had taken a tank out of commission. Since you were going slow, 900 miles in 11 days with 2000 miles remaining how was your fuel margin to run the water maker for the remaining 22 days? Did you have backup water tankage?

smackdaddy 14-05-2014 11:40

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by captain58sailin (Post 1541145)
On my vessel the starboard quarter is near the stern on the starboard side.

Yeah - my bad there. I mistakenly referred to the starboard bow. Even so, isn't there a chainplate also in the approximate area of the starboard quarter in that photo? It's not really a precise description, right?

colemj 14-05-2014 11:43

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
I can't imagine a deck made from teak screwed into plywood which is screwed onto wood beams. There is no way RH could have lasted that long without the deck rotting into the cabin. Even in San Diego. However, I have seem many boats with only an outer skin of fiberglass, while the underneath (inside) of the deck is not glassed. Perhaps Eric was just mistaken on this point because he can see the inside? The outside glass wouldn't be visible without tearing up the teak.

If not, that would have to be mighty high-quality plywood that has seen almost no rain or salt water in its life.

Mark

Mycroft 14-05-2014 11:44

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by smackdaddy (Post 1541160)
Yeah - my bad there. I mistakenly referred to the starboard bow. Even so, isn't there a chainplate also in the approximate area of the starboard quarter in that photo? It's not really a precise measurement, right?

The chainplates are nowhere near the port or starboard qtr.

MarkJ 14-05-2014 11:44

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by smackdaddy (Post 1541142)

This is important in since there was significant damage to the side-deck, hull-joint area in conditions that didn't seem to be epic. Rot would explain some of that I think.

From you earlier post quoted from RBs blog:

Quote:


There are a few deck cracks that will leak once the rain starts, which is really only about two and a half months away. I might put it off until we get back to San Diego and just enjoy the summer, but I'm a little nervous about it.

Cause and effect?

MarkJ 14-05-2014 11:48

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mycroft (Post 1541165)
The chainplates are nowhere near the port or starboard qtr.

What about the backstay? What does that attach to?

smackdaddy 14-05-2014 11:51

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mycroft (Post 1541165)
The chainplates are nowhere near the port or starboard qtr.

Sure they are. Look at that photo I posted and look at this diagram:

https://www.photographers1.com/Sailin...Directions.gif

The aft-most chainplate falls right at the area where the beam/quarter arrows fall in the diagram (e.g. - the forward part of the starboard quarter). Unless RH provides more definitive information how can you be so certain of things?

smackdaddy 14-05-2014 11:52

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MarkJ (Post 1541166)
From you earlier post quoted from RBs blog:




Cause and effect?

That's what I'm wondering.

Andrew B. 14-05-2014 11:54

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by sailorboy1 (Post 1541149)
How do some of you keep track of all the posts on this thread in order to come up some petty comeback post????????????? I can not even separate key takeaways from crap on the thread anymore.

The "ignore' feature helps me tremendously !

Mycroft 14-05-2014 11:57

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
In my much less than expert opinion, the qtr ends at around where that fender is and the back stay attaches to the stern.

Just my 2 cents.

This discussion is similar to how many angels dance on a pin. Since Eric doesn't know where the water was coming from and if it was the area of the chainplates, it would have been pretty obvious, then I think it's unsolvable.

SaltyMonkey 14-05-2014 12:00

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Andrew B. (Post 1541181)
The "ignore' feature helps me tremendously !

:thumb: thanks

MarkJ 14-05-2014 12:05

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
1 Attachment(s)
Heres a pic

fryewe 14-05-2014 12:05

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mycroft (Post 1541183)
Since Eric doesn't know where the water was coming from and if it was the area of the chainplates, it would have been pretty obvious, then I think it's unsolvable.

Eric posted earlier that he tried 4200 and 5200 to stop the leak and it washed away from the leak site. So it appears he did know where the leak was but was unable to stop it using the methods he wanted to invest time in.

My impression is that he thought it was a lower-order issue and he had higher priorities because the ingress rate was low and he was able to de-water easily.

Perhaps he'll give a better description of the damage/it's location and his observations and thoughts on this aspect at some point. It'll only happen when he's ready.

smackdaddy 14-05-2014 12:07

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mycroft (Post 1541183)
In my much less than expert opinion, the qtr ends at around where that fender is and the back stay attaches to the stern.

Just my 2 cents.

This discussion is similar to how many angels dance on a pin. Since Eric doesn't know where the water was coming from and if it was the area of the chainplates, it would have been pretty obvious, then I think it's unsolvable.

Yeah - you may be right. But here's RH's description:

Quote:

Originally Posted by rebel heart (Post 1538603)
And if you want to throw a ******** flag that's your business, but keep in mind the 129th guys saw the water coming in over the starboard quarter bulkhead and helped pump for the days they were onboard.

So maybe we had a natural mountain spring develop there and nice pure crystal water we could have bottled was coming through.

Or maybe a tiny little gnome sat in the overhead, with a very active bladder.

So where would that "starboard quarter bulkhead" be? A few feet aft of the chainplate?

What else could have ripped open the boat in this area? He said the stanchions where still on. So was it those cracks he mentioned? Rot? What?

smackdaddy 14-05-2014 12:13

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MarkJ (Post 1541188)
Heres a pic

That is a nice looking boat, Mark (Bob's a great designer, eh?). It reminds me a lot of the PSC37 I did some off-shore racing on (double-ender cutter) - some of it in some fairly sporty conditions. Fun, solid boats.

ontherocks83 14-05-2014 12:26

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Maybe I've lost track, but where is this thread going? So the leak was somewhere in the starboard quarter. Maybe Eric knows exactly where or maybe it was coming from that area but couldn't see the exact failure point. I am all for analyzing any accident so that I may learn from it but this seems to be getting a bit nit picky.

Also if you want to pick apart every word Eric has said maybe you should read up on something called the fog of war. I am sure from the minute the accident happened until the minute he got onboard the navy vessel his adrenaline did not stop once. His mind was probably on survival of his family and not on which teak board he should pull up to find the exact failure so that he could fill us in on how many inches from the transom the crack was. He assessed the situation, he found it was not repairable, he found it was not life threatening and he moved on to his next of 100 problems.

To me it seems there are one or two people that want to discredit Eric on everything he has said. But then again maybe I am missing something.

To Eric: I am thrilled you and your family are healthy and safe. Please don't read too much into the smelly stuff that that seems to be getting thrown around by some people.

MarkJ 14-05-2014 12:29

re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
1 Attachment(s)
Heres the layout showing the quarter bulkhead. Its miles aft than the chainplates except the backstay chainplate.
Actually there are two bulkheads there, one at the foot of the pilot berth and one at the head of the pilot berth.


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 18:12.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.


ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.