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DoubleWhisky 18-05-2014 06:07

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
[QUOTE=boatman61;1543757]
Quote:

Originally Posted by Palarran (Post 1543752)
What does this have to do with Metaphysics though :) QUOTE]

meta·phys·ics

noun plural but singular in construction \-ˈfi-ziks\ .headword .ld_on_collegiate { margin:10px 0 0 0;padding:0 0 0 19px; width: 405px;} .ld_on_collegiate p {margin:0 0 10px 0;padding:0;line-height:20px; } .ld_on_collegiate p.bottom_entry {margin:0 0 3px 0;padding:0;line-height:20px;} #mwEntryData div.headword .ld_on_collegiate p em, .ld_on_collegiate p em { color: black; font-weight: normal; } #mwEntryData div.headword + div.d { margin-top: -7px; } .ld_on_collegiate .bnote { font-weight: bold; } .ld_on_collegiate .sl, .ld_on_collegiate .ssl { font-style: italic; } : the part of philosophy that is concerned with the basic
Cruisers Forum members
causes and nature of things

**** Happens:p:p:p



L O L
:D :D :D :D :D

weavis 18-05-2014 06:32

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Palarran (Post 1543752)
What does this have to do with Metaphysics though :)


Really Phil, I agree with the post 100%. We tend to focus on the last domino that falls and disregard the first that started the chain reaction.

well thank you for getting it.

And I still distance myself from bringing metaphysics into the discussion in the first place...... :thumb:

weavis 18-05-2014 06:48

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
https://static.fjcdn.com/pictures/Mea...f1_4825323.jpg

Paul L 18-05-2014 06:51

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by boatman61 (Post 1543737)
The 'accidents' are not rare.. nor the poor state (in hindsight) of the vessel... many broach and recover.. many have failure of systems and/or boat integrity... many are unsafe in the eye's of others... many also have had to call in help for sick crew and.. from what I can make out with the USCG its a policy of 'One off.. All off'..
Did Eric have the option to stay on board if things were as bad as suggested.. (regardless of what he actually chose to do).. or even if they were not..??
From my understanding of past CG rescues and the debates on here that followed them.. I think not:whistling:
The only rare thing about this event is that there was a young child considered to be at risk of dying..
I doubt anyone here thinks Eric made the wrong call.. if the child was in danger he did good..:thumb:
I don't even think he did bad taking the kids..
I know folk who've given birth on board.. sailed the world as they raised their kids and only slowing down as they reached school age and felt an education amongst peers was a good idea.
My interest lies in his seamanship and choices made on route selection etc.. not so much as to criticise.. but as to hear/suggest better options... such as Jim Cate's saying a departure from further N is better for steadier winds and reaching a more favourable point to cross the Equator..
These are the things us 'Voyeurs' can learn from.. or assist those looking to learn..
Simple things like.. in theory an ocean voyage should only take 20 days.. carry food and water for forty.. and don't trust what you put in your tanks.. else you'll end up calling up a Container Ship for drinking water.... OOPPPPSSSSSSSSSSS:rolleyes::D

Certainly agree about doing the analysis to better understand what really went wrong and how it can help cruisers make better decisions on future passages. A good 20 or 30% of this thread has focused on that. Totally disagree on that 'accidents are not rare'. For an individual or couple doing passages, accidents are rare. Passage making is not some high likelihood disaster. Failed passages with loss of the boat or life do occur. You hear about them on the interweb. That doesn't make them common for a passage maker. It makes them news.

Palarran 18-05-2014 06:54

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by weavis (Post 1543789)
well thank you for getting it.

And I still distance myself from bringing metaphysics into the discussion in the first place...... :thumb:

Really don't thank me. I don't get it at all but please don't try to educate me anymore. And being a ringleader then trying to deny it? Come on, you can't post 20 times in a row about this and then say "Well, I didn't start it".

weavis 18-05-2014 06:58

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Palarran (Post 1543807)
Really don't thank me. I don't get it at all but please don't try to educate me anymore. And being a ringleader then trying to deny it? Come on, you can't post 20 times in a row about this and then say "Well, I didn't start it".

I think I spent a few posts refuting the metaphysical aspects.
Whatever.

boatman61 18-05-2014 07:17

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Paul L (Post 1543803)
Totally disagree on that 'accidents are not rare'. For an individual or couple doing passages, accidents are rare. Passage making is not some high likelihood disaster. Failed passages with loss of the boat or life do occur. You hear about them on the interweb. That doesn't make them common for a passage maker. It makes them news.

Rubbish.. I can think of at least 3 boats that have lost their mast due to rig failure.. a Spanish friend got rolled and dismasted on his way to the Canaries.. MarkJ came close when his forestay went on his way to the Carib..
Folk break bones.. I've broken ribs at sea a few times.. most deal with the situation and jury rig a mast, whatever and struggle on.. these are the many you never hear about.. unless they post it in a forum...
Have not had a delivery yet that has not experienced gear failure of one type or another.. and that includes new.. that's one of the reasons I started posting my Oz trip.. someone wanted to know what a delivery was like.. and I underplayed a lot..:D
The one's that you do hear about are the ones who call for rescue and abandon ship.. that's NEWS.. and provable..
Don't make the misconception that everythings a piece of cake.. 9 out of 10 boats will have something fail/go wrong on a passage..
and 8 of those 9 will say.. "Piece of cake mate.. had worse times trying to get into my home port"...
We're so Macho...:p:p:p

ka4wja 18-05-2014 07:18

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Phil,
I usually agree with 'ya mate....(and in this thread I DO agree with almost everything you wrote..)


And, in this statement (whether it was the USCG running things out-at-sea for this particular rescue, or the US Navy), I suspect you are correct here....for this specific instance...
Quote:

Originally Posted by boatman61 (Post 1543737)
Did Eric have the option to stay on board if things were as bad as suggested.. (regardless of what he actually chose to do).. or even if they were not..??
From my understanding of past CG rescues and the debates on here that followed them.. I think not

But, if the vessel was seaworthy and the remaining crew was capable, this is not USCG policy (unless things have changed in the past week)....






Here, we disagree.....
Quote:

Originally Posted by boatman61 (Post 1543737)
... many also have had to call in help for sick crew and.. from what I can make out with the USCG its a policy of 'One off.. All off'..

Perhaps you are allowing the stories on-line to serve as "proof", but this is not daily SOP for the USCG around here....and not their policy...

They regularly rescue/remove sick or injured individuals from vessels (small private yachts, sail and power....sportfishing boats....commercial fishing boats....and even occasionally cruise ships and large merchant vessels...)
These scenarios play out in the coastal waters and near offshore waters (out a couple hundred miles), along the US East Coast regularly....and along the SE coast of Florida, it is a weekly and almost daily occurrence... :)

Further, when merchant ships at sea are tasked to rescue / remove sick or injured crew from another vessel, if that vessel's master wishes to continue-on and that vessel (and remaining crew) are deemed to be seaworthy / capable (by USCG if a US-flagged vessel), then the vessel, master, and remaining crew can continue-on....(this scenario is played out between US and Bermuda, a few times each year....)



Again, in the Rebel Heart situation...yes, the damage to the vessel and the capability of the one remaining crew to single-hand another 2000 miles(?), were certainly a major factor in any determination as to whether he'd be allowed to stay on-board or not....but in more "typical" medical evacuations (if there is anything that can be considered "typical"), as long as it were seaworthy and the crew capable, the vessel would be allowed to continue on....





Fair winds...

John
s/v Annie Laurie

letsgetsailing3 18-05-2014 07:21

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by boatman61 (Post 1543737)
The 'accidents' are not rare.. nor the poor state (in hindsight) of the vessel... many broach and recover.. many have failure of systems and/or boat integrity... many are unsafe in the eye's of others... many also have had to call in help for sick crew and.. from what I can make out with the USCG its a policy of 'One off.. All off'..
Did Eric have the option to stay on board if things were as bad as suggested.. (regardless of what he actually chose to do).. or even if they were not..??
From my understanding of past CG rescues and the debates on here that followed them.. I think not:whistling:
The only rare thing about this event is that there was a young child considered to be at risk of dying..
I doubt anyone here thinks Eric made the wrong call.. if the child was in danger he did good..:thumb:
I don't even think he did bad taking the kids..
I know folk who've given birth on board.. sailed the world as they raised their kids and only slowing down as they reached school age and felt an education amongst peers was a good idea.
My interest lies in his seamanship and choices made on route selection etc.. not so much as to criticise.. but as to hear/suggest better options... such as Jim Cate's saying a departure from further N is better for steadier winds and reaching a more favourable point to cross the Equator..
These are the things us 'Voyeurs' can learn from.. or assist those looking to learn..
Simple things like.. in theory an ocean voyage should only take 20 days.. carry food and water for forty.. and don't trust what you put in your tanks.. else you'll end up calling up a Container Ship for drinking water.... OOPPPPSSSSSSSSSSS:rolleyes::D


Some good observations. Especially the bit about having extra water. You really know your stuff.... :whistling:

boatman61 18-05-2014 07:29

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Sorry mate.. I stand corrected..
In mitigation I'm a Brit on an American (90%) Forum so my knowledge/impression comes from what's posted on here by your countrymen.. and comments made in the 4 years I've been a member.. and the posts covering rescue in and near US waters in that time...
I do know that over here they will come out and stand by till the last moment if need be while one try's to make it in.. or as in the Azores they will send out the Lifeboat even when assistance is not requested but a boat has had a problem.. as in my case a few weeks ago..:D
See... one can learn things from this event..

letsgetsailing3 18-05-2014 07:35

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by weavis (Post 1543812)
I think I spent a few posts refuting the metaphysical aspects.
Whatever.

Nothing a little introspection couldn't cure. :flowers:

weavis 18-05-2014 07:38

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by letsgetsailing3 (Post 1543839)
Nothing a little introspection couldn't cure. :flowers:

lolol :thumb:

Paul L 18-05-2014 07:43

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by boatman61 (Post 1543824)
Rubbish.. I can think of at least 3 boats that have lost their mast due to rig failure.. a Spanish friend got rolled and dismasted on his way to the Canaries.. MarkJ came close when his forestay went on his way to the Carib..
Folk break bones.. I've broken ribs at sea a few times.. most deal with the situation and jury rig a mast, whatever and struggle on.. these are the many you never hear about.. unless they post it in a forum...
Have not had a delivery yet that has not experienced gear failure of one type or another.. and that includes new.. that's one of the reasons I started posting my Oz trip.. someone wanted to know what a delivery was like.. and I underplayed a lot..:D
The one's that you do hear about are the ones who call for rescue and abandon ship.. that's NEWS.. and provable..
Don't make the misconception that everythings a piece of cake.. 9 out of 10 boats will have something fail/go wrong on a passage..
and 8 of those 9 will say.. "Piece of cake mate.. had worse times trying to get into my home port"...
We're so Macho...:p:p:p

Maybe I just don't understand the language. Something breaks on almost all passages, often serious things and multiple things. But the number of boats lost or lives lost is very small versus the number craft out there. Its just a fact. I can't see how you could take what I said as 'Macho'. Must be a language thing again.

Mycroft 18-05-2014 07:48

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
I don't know what official USCG policy is for rescue, but I do know what happened with Satori:

S/V SATORI - The Perfect Storm: The whole story

Quote:

Within a couple of hours a helicopter flew over and raised them on the radio indicating that the Tamaroa, a Coast vessel, was going to try and contact them on the VHF. When the Tamaroa arrived and called the Satori Ray again reported that the boat was O.K., that he wanted to stay, but that the crew wanted to get off. The Captain of Tamaroa radioed back and told Ray that he had specific orders from Headquarters in Boston to remove everyone from the boat. Ray knew that if he refused the order to abandon ship he could loose his captain's license and Satori's Coast Guard documentation. His boat could then be prohibited from entering American ports.

weavis 18-05-2014 07:52

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Paul L (Post 1543845)
Maybe I just don't understand the language. Something breaks on almost all passages, often serious things and multiple things. But the number of boats lost or lives lost is very small versus the number craft out there. Its just a fact. I can't see how you could take what I said as 'Macho'. Must be a language thing again.

He didnt say that Paul.

it was a phrase used to describe all the above.

Like someone telling of all the things that go wrong and how the problems were overcome.. and then saying.. " We are so Macho!" in a funny way.

Like when a kid asks you how to fix something and it works.. and then they ask how you knew..... and you say "Coz daddy is so smart!"

It must be a language thing.......

Spleen 18-05-2014 08:23

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by boatman61 (Post 1543824)
Rubbish.. I can think of at least 3 boats that have lost their mast due to rig failure.. a Spanish friend got rolled and dismasted on his way to the Canaries.. MarkJ came close when his forestay went on his way to the Carib..
Folk break bones.. I've broken ribs at sea a few times.. most deal with the situation and jury rig a mast, whatever and struggle on.. these are the many you never hear about.. unless they post it in a forum...
Have not had a delivery yet that has not experienced gear failure of one type or another.. and that includes new.. that's one of the reasons I started posting my Oz trip.. someone wanted to know what a delivery was like.. and I underplayed a lot..:D
The one's that you do hear about are the ones who call for rescue and abandon ship.. that's NEWS.. and provable..
Don't make the misconception that everythings a piece of cake.. 9 out of 10 boats will have something fail/go wrong on a passage..
and 8 of those 9 will say.. "Piece of cake mate.. had worse times trying to get into my home port"...
We're so Macho...:p:p:p



How common would you say a broach is, especially on an ocean passage? And is it "no big deal"? If you take on ocean passages, should you expect broaches?

SaltyMonkey 18-05-2014 08:40

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
MetaPhysics

1) the branch of philosophy that deals with the first principles of things, including abstract concepts such as being, knowing, substance, cause, identity, time, and space.
2) abstract theory or talk with no basis in reality.

From the Greek: ta meta ta phusika

Prairie Chicken 18-05-2014 09:59

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by weavis (Post 1543801)

Priceless!

SaltyMonkey 18-05-2014 10:12

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
https://weknowmemes.com/generator/upl...4469927245.jpg

MarkJ 18-05-2014 10:36

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by boatman61 (Post 1543824)
Rubbish.. I can think of at least 3 boats that have lost their mast due to rig failure.. a Spanish friend got rolled and dismasted on his way to the Canaries.. MarkJ came close when his forestay went on his way to the Carib..

This was in response to someone saying accidents do not often happen.

Yes, I snapped me forestay in the middle of the Atlantic and could have easily lost my stick.

Thats why I do take these threads seriously and would prefer the forum peanuts to play in another forum or outside in the kindy sand pit.

I was coming from the Canaries to St Martin as the last leg of my circumnavigation. i did a rig check in the Canaries and had the intention to rerig in St Martin as the rigging was original.

400nm before St Martin in about 30 knots on a beam reach I had two reefs in the main and was just wondering if I should put another roll in the genoa when Neptune answered my question.

The Auto Pilot was on and I headed dead downwind.

The genoa was still held up by its halyard and I was able to gently furl it.

Then I thought it would be a good moment to stop and think. Which I thought was a good idea :) because I was just about to lower the mainsail. Then I thought that theres not much holding the mast up, and the compression of the halyard would be adding a bit, and I didnt have 400 NMs of fuel anyway.

I ran my spinnaker pole topping lift to the bow, obviously.

Keeping a dead downwind course I was heading towards Antigua also 400nms

So things were quite OK, I could sail to Antigua, fill up, and motor to st Martin. As it turned out over the next few days the wind moderated and got a bit more south in it so I was able to sail 300 miles and motored the last 100.

Reasons why I was lucky:
Extremely lucky I could furl the genoa.
Wind was only 30 knots anyway. Then it moderated in the next few days.
I could head downwind and still be getting somewhere to fix the boat.
I stopped and thought about my problem before I screwed the fixing of it
I didnt try to drop the genoa, nor the main.

When the rigger showed me where the forestay had broken the break was more than 1 cm inside the swaged fitting at the mast head. SO theres no way I could ever have spotted a problem in any check. And it was a problem, at least 4 of the broken strands had rust on the cut surface of the wire, that means it had been weak for some time.... So very lucky.


That, my friends, is why I read and examine these threads... Because we never know what our problem is going to be so we can only learn from other peoples situations. Thats why I would never sail with the peanuts who say examining this thread is irrelevant (and then do 50 off topic posts) because they have no understanding about their lack of predicability of their own boat, the weather or anything that may help them in an, all too frequent, problem.



Mark :)

MarkJ 18-05-2014 10:54

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Spleen (Post 1543870)
How common would you say a broach is, especially on an ocean passage? And is it "no big deal"? If you take on ocean passages, should you expect broaches?

Did we work out what we mean by 'broach'?
We should never, as cruisers, be in a position to broach from sail action alone.

From Wikipedia

Quote:

A sailboat broaches when its heading suddenly changes towards the wind due to wind/sail interactions for which the rudder cannot compensate. This causes the boat to enter a Death roll, rolling dangerously and if not controlled may lead to a capsize and turning turtle. This happens when the aerodynamic force on the rig greatly exceeds the hydrodynamic force on the hull, due to a sudden increase in wind strength or turbulent sea conditions. In larger boats broaching can lay the mast horizontal, putting both rig and crew at risk. It can be particularly dangerous when racing other boats at close quarters.

If you keep the boat below hull speed you are very unlikely to broach on a well found boat with proper rudder. Especially important when reaching with a spinnaker and maybe sufing waves. On Auto Pilot you cant feel how much more rudder you have to keep it out of the wind on gusts, or waves pushing your bum.

Last time I posted some reply about keeping your speed down on long passages to hull speed a whole bunch of people then started going on about them doing 14 knots yada yada... Of course they were only doing 14 down one lucky massive surfing wave otherwise they would be sailing 340nms per day. But what they are doing is running a boat physics says can do 8 knots and the manufactures design a rudder for 10 knots down a wave at 14, obviously OUT of control!

A great ocean is not to place to try tricks you'd use on a saturday afternoon race! We are not doing the Vinderloo round the world race with 20 crew either! We are cruising to a margarita with out wives!!

So use the relaxed concept and reef at hull speed. :)



Mark
PS I like the Vinderloo gag :D

tomfl 18-05-2014 11:34

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MarkJ (Post 1543961)
SNIP

A great ocean is not to place to try tricks you'd use on a saturday afternoon race! We are not doing the Vinderloo round the world race with 20 crew either! We are cruising to a margarita with out wives!!

So use the relaxed concept and reef at hull speed. :)

SNIP

A couple of weeks ago I was day sailing. Put about thirty miles on the odometer. Was maybe eight/ten miles past the reef when I hit the grass line. Maybe 12-15 knots and I headed up and put two reefs in the main and started my heaving to drill. I think it is quite worthwhile to heave to in the grass line and try and stay in the grass line as long as possible, especially if you have a spinner and are trying to catch a fish. I was able to stay in the grass line long enough that a power boat trolling the grass line had to change course to stay safely away from me.

Not what I would call a weekend race but one of the reasons I do things like this is so the first time I heave to is not in fifty knots and a heavy sea way in the Gulf Stream. Every time you go out in a boat you should be learning more about your boat.

tomfl 18-05-2014 11:48

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MarkJ (Post 1543961)
SNIP

If you keep the boat below hull speed you are very unlikely to broach on a well found boat with proper rudder. Especially important when reaching with a spinnaker and maybe sufing waves. On Auto Pilot you cant feel how much more rudder you have to keep it out of the wind on gusts, or waves pushing your bum.


SNIP

Maybe not in RH's case but how do you determine the hull speed of a multihull. Also have to wonder about how advisable it is to fly a spinnaker in conditions where you will be surfing.

I spend a lot of time day sailing between the reef and the Gulf Stream often in 15-20 knots of wind and waves big enough to surf on. I think it is very important to get a good feel for how your boat surfs. How your boat balances with a working jib and one reef, or two reefs when surfing. The more time you spend doing things like this in under twenty knots and close to help the better shape you will be in when you need to do it in worse conditions far from help.

Surfing is a skill than can be learned just like other sailing skills.

Surf's up dude.:thumb:

MarkJ 18-05-2014 11:49

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MarkJ (Post 1543961)
We are cruising to a margarita with out wives!!

Was meant to read "cruising to a margarita with OUR wives"

:rolleyes:

Ipads :confused:

weavis 18-05-2014 11:51

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by tomfl (Post 1543991)
Maybe not in RH's case but how do you determine the hull speed of a multihull. Also have to wonder about how advisable it is to fly a spinnaker in conditions where you will be surfing.

I spend a lot of time day sailing between the reef and the Gulf Stream often in 15-20 knots of wind and waves big enough to surf on. I think it is very important to get a good feel for how your boat surfs. How your boat balances with a working jib and one reef, or two reefs when surfing. The more time you spend doing things like this in under twenty knots and close to help the better shape you will be in when you need to do it in worse conditions far from help.

Surfing is a skill than can be learned just like other sailing skills.

Surf's up dude.:thumb:

Tom, Does the Seawind have daggerboards?

(EDIT)Never mind..... I was getting it mixed up with another Cat.... Sorry..

Paul L 18-05-2014 11:56

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MarkJ (Post 1543952)
This was in response to someone saying accidents do not often happen.
...

No, it was in response to someone who said that accidents that result in the loss of a boat or a fatality are rare. Versus the number of boats on passage, that is a fact. That's one reason they are so interesting to analyze and to learn from.

tomfl 18-05-2014 12:05

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Paul L (Post 1544000)
No, it was in response to someone who said that accidents that result in the loss of a boat or a fatality are rare. Versus the number of boats on passage, that is a fact. That's one reason they are so interesting to analyze and to learn from.

If the truth be known I have no idea how many boats are on a passage or what portion of boats on passage suffer serious issues. It is hard for me to believe nine out of ten boats on a passage have serious problems; but I might be wrong.

I also wonder about what I will call the condition of boats going out on a passage. I tend to do something like replace all the running rigging before going to the Bahamas and do some type of standing rigging check. Also change the fluids in the motors and check the other systems. My boat has no structural wood the hull seems sound.

Anyone have suggestions or want to share their personal experience with what they do before heading out on a passage to reduce the possibility of suffering damage to the boat.

boatman61 18-05-2014 12:08

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Paul L (Post 1543845)
Maybe I just don't understand the language. Something breaks on almost all passages, often serious things and multiple things. But the number of boats lost or lives lost is very small versus the number craft out there. Its just a fact. I can't see how you could take what I said as 'Macho'. Must be a language thing again.

Yup... definitely a language thing... nothing to do with your masculinity..:flowers:
'We're so Macho' was about the guys who deal with all kind of crap on a trip then.. sitting in a bar the other side say.. "Yeah.. the trip was not to bad.. no big deal.."
Then again.. maybe its more a Brit thing..:D

boatman61 18-05-2014 12:55

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by letsgetsailing3 (Post 1543831)
Some good observations. Especially the bit about having extra water. You really know your stuff.... :whistling:

Just enough to get me to 65... will let you know if its enough when I hit 66.. then 67..:D
Fact is.. many on here can sail rings round me.. but then a seaman is different from you guys.. we work at your play.. different approach and mind set..:whistling:

And to the guy with the flying cap..:flowers:
I did not say 9 out of 10 have serious problems..
I said they suffer gear failure of one kind or the other.. if your gonna attempt to quote me.. get it right..:thumb::flowers:
Some however may be potentially serious if ignored or put off..
Personal experience here.. on my 1st non-stop solo from SMX to the UK when I was about 400miles NNW of the Azores a lower shroud popped in the middle off the night..
I always do crossings with main reefed right down at night.. so I flipped her on the opposite tack and hove to.. next morning I dug out all my spare blocks and pulled out the spinnaker halyard.. rigged up a loop going over and under the port spreader where it meets the mast.. kinda figure of 8 with the loop coming round either side of the mast.. fitted a double block there and another at the bottle screw and ran the line through and back to the port winch.. tensioned it up and tied off.. it served for the next 1200 miles to the UK.. apart from occasional taking up of the stretch..
I could have put it of till the sea was calmer.. lucky I did not as there was a strong N'ly 36hrs after it was done.. that was one of the times I broke some ribs.. lost my grip up there.. swung out and slammed back into the mast as she pitched.. next time I went up at sea I ran a loop round to lock me in..
Painful lessons are the soonest learnt...:p:p:p

Prairie Chicken 18-05-2014 14:10

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
A favourite aviation quote seems to apply here: Learn from the mistakes of others; you can't live long enough to make them all yourself.

tomfl 18-05-2014 14:34

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by boatman61 (Post 1544031)
SNIP

And to the guy with the flying cap..:flowers:
I did not say 9 out of 10 have serious problems..
I said they suffer gear failure of one kind or the other.. if your gonna attempt to quote me.. get it right..:thumb::flowers:
SNIP

England and America are two countries separated by a common language according to George Bernard Shaw.
Most folks I know would agree losing a mast or breaking a rib is a serious problem. Maybe it is time for you to post what you consider a serious problem.:whistling:

JPA Cate 18-05-2014 15:14

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Tomfl,

The incident at sea where you have to go aloft to do something is both a big deal and not a big deal, which is weird, but. Sometimes one has a situation that MUST be dealt with, NOW, and at that moment it is a big deal. In Boaties example above, had he lost the mast, it would have been a real p*sser, instead of a damned uncomfortable event with an excellent outcome. Action HAD to be very quick. By the time you're in port, you're down to it no longer being a big deal, being pleased with yourself and waiting for it to quit hurting when you want to laugh. It is all a process. And it probably took as long as the ribs hurt for all the other bruises to go away, because that, too, is part of the price you pay when you go aloft at sea in a mono. I've no experiences with it in a cat, and only second hand myself, 'cause it was Jim who went aloft to replace our broken baby stay when that happened.*

Add British understatement, a skill, which if learned, will earn you a few delighted smiles in some environments.

*The wire that broke was the only one not replaced when we re-rigged. It looked perfect , but had corroded on the inside. Another lesson.
Ann

tomfl 18-05-2014 15:23

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ann T. Cate (Post 1544132)
Tomfl,

The incident at sea where you have to go aloft to do something is both a big deal and not a big deal, which is weird, but.

SNIP

Well I am glad we got that cleared up.:whistling:

boatman61 18-05-2014 15:37

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by tomfl (Post 1544104)
England and America are two countries separated by a common language according to George Bernard Shaw.
Most folks I know would agree losing a mast or breaking a rib is a serious problem. Maybe it is time for you to post what you consider a serious problem.:whistling:

A hull to hull split under the bridge deck in a 9m Catalac 12 miles S of Cape Trafalgar with a 50kt E'ly against tide.. steep breaking sea's.. over one then stop dead as the next breaks over you.. repeat.. water gushing in in spurts.. the crew sticking their head out and waving one of the manual bilge pumps that had ripped of the rotten ply bulkhead..
Having to steer with the engines as the rudders could not cope... and the engines struggled..
Hate getting in dodgy situations with crew aboard..
That's when I called out the Barbette Lifeboat to stand by in case we sank before reaching safe waters.. and to guide us through the 4 sets of Tuna nets that are there.. we hit one.. but luckily lifted over on a wave before snagging..
I'm a lucky SOB...:p:p:p

Kenomac 18-05-2014 16:09

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
I've been absent from this discussion for over a week, 'looks like no detailed answers provided by Eric despite many questions... no surprise to me. And now he disappears once again when the questions get specific....

Interesting.

boatman61 18-05-2014 16:19

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kenomac (Post 1544175)
I've been absent from this discussion for over a week, 'looks like no detailed answers provided by Eric despite many questions... no surprise to me. And now he disappears once again when the questions get specific....

Interesting.

Naah.. he's taking a break while Weavis and I keep the rest amused... he offered us $10/post to keep you lot occupied..:thumb:
But don't tell him I told you..:devil:

tomfl 18-05-2014 16:51

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by boatman61 (Post 1544181)
Naah.. he's taking a break while Weavis and I keep the rest amused... he offered us $10/post to keep you lot occupied..:thumb:
But don't tell him I told you..:devil:

Boy did you get scammed he offered me $US20 a post.:p

Coops 18-05-2014 16:55

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
You are obviously twice as good at filling posts with nothing.:D

Coops.

boatman61 18-05-2014 16:57

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Coops (Post 1544208)
You are obviously twice as good at filling posts with nothing.:D

Coops.

So.. can I take it I'm half full...:)
or half empty..:rolleyes:

Coops 18-05-2014 17:06

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Either is preferable to being half witted or worse, half cocked.:D

Coops.


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