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-   -   Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged) (https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f129/call-for-help-this-american-life-merged-125942.html)

boatman61 18-05-2014 16:19

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kenomac (Post 1544175)
I've been absent from this discussion for over a week, 'looks like no detailed answers provided by Eric despite many questions... no surprise to me. And now he disappears once again when the questions get specific....

Interesting.

Naah.. he's taking a break while Weavis and I keep the rest amused... he offered us $10/post to keep you lot occupied..:thumb:
But don't tell him I told you..:devil:

tomfl 18-05-2014 16:51

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by boatman61 (Post 1544181)
Naah.. he's taking a break while Weavis and I keep the rest amused... he offered us $10/post to keep you lot occupied..:thumb:
But don't tell him I told you..:devil:

Boy did you get scammed he offered me $US20 a post.:p

Coops 18-05-2014 16:55

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
You are obviously twice as good at filling posts with nothing.:D

Coops.

boatman61 18-05-2014 16:57

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Coops (Post 1544208)
You are obviously twice as good at filling posts with nothing.:D

Coops.

So.. can I take it I'm half full...:)
or half empty..:rolleyes:

Coops 18-05-2014 17:06

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Either is preferable to being half witted or worse, half cocked.:D

Coops.

tomfl 18-05-2014 17:13

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Coops (Post 1544219)
Either is preferable to being half witted or worse, half cocked.:D

Coops.

But worse than having a boat with only half as many hulls as it needs.

SaltyMonkey 18-05-2014 17:16

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
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Coops 18-05-2014 17:23

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by tomfl (Post 1544230)
But worse than having a boat with only half as many hulls as it needs.

Some would say that is three, so one and half would be a sod.

Coops.

boatman61 18-05-2014 17:29

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Coops (Post 1544242)
Some would say that is three, so one and half would be a sod.

Coops.

Isn't that whats known as a Proa...
for the 'not so dis-abled..'

Coops 18-05-2014 17:36

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Ah yes, the sod-proa. I had forgotten about that deviant branch of sailing craft.

Coops.

SV THIRD DAY 18-05-2014 17:58

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Paul L (Post 1543803)
Totally disagree on that 'accidents are not rare'. For an individual or couple doing passages, accidents are rare. Passage making is not some high likelihood disaster. Failed passages with loss of the boat or life do occur. You hear about them on the interweb. That doesn't make them common for a passage maker. It makes them news.

Spend a few years hanging out in Cruiser hauts and it's almost a daily occurance to watch people coming into port after an "accident" and looking to make repairs. I see accidents while on passage as common as the passages themselves...Some are just bigger problems than others. But accidents and dealing with them are every bit a part of cruising as learning to anchor!

Palarran 18-05-2014 18:20

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by tomfl (Post 1543991)
Maybe not in RH's case but how do you determine the hull speed of a multihull. Also have to wonder about how advisable it is to fly a spinnaker in conditions where you will be surfing.

I spend a lot of time day sailing between the reef and the Gulf Stream often in 15-20 knots of wind and waves big enough to surf on. I think it is very important to get a good feel for how your boat surfs. How your boat balances with a working jib and one reef, or two reefs when surfing. The more time you spend doing things like this in under twenty knots and close to help the better shape you will be in when you need to do it in worse conditions far from help.

Surfing is a skill than can be learned just like other sailing skills.

Surf's up dude.:thumb:

So are you saying you can sail your seawind fast enough to stay on a wave? Incredible. I've had my boat accelerate on waves but they have always overtaken me.

I'm going to guess you know the answer to the first question with a spinnaker.

Spleen 18-05-2014 18:45

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MarkJ (Post 1543961)
Did we work out what we mean by 'broach'?
We should never, as cruisers, be in a position to broach from sail

Of course, I asked it as a loaded question based on the transcripts from "this American life"

Ira:
Well, Eric said that one of the big problems began the day before they called for help. Basically they sailed into a part of the ocean called the Intertropical Convergence Zone where they hit some nasty weather and waves. Not horrible Eric said. You'd expect this kind of thing on an ocean crossing. But they were getting rained on every 30 to 35 minutes with squalls, waves are going over the boat, covering the deck. And then-- here's the bad part-- they get broached, which is sailing language for a wave pushed their boat onto its side, just for a few seconds, and then it righted itself.

Charlotte Kaufman
We got knocked over several times. And people have asked Eric, were you scared out there? And Eric always says, no, I wasn't scared. But I was in the cabin with the girls, and one time our oldest was going to the bathroom by herself-- because she's three, she's almost four, and she want's to do everything by herself-- and when that wave hit it's the scariest sound.

Ira Glass
Because it's just a big bang?

Charlotte Kaufman
Yeah. It's this huge bang. It's like you were in a car accident. You're expecting to go up and see who just T-boned you. But it was a wave.

Ira Glass
And so you guys are downstairs in the cabin and Eric is upstairs driving the boat. Is he upstairs out on the deck when the boat gets turned on its side?

Charlotte Kaufman
Yes. He was definitely on the side decks. But he goes out there clipped in, and we all maintain the rule, one hand for you, one hand for the ship. So he's always holding on.

Ira Glass
So he's clipped on with straps and stuff, so he can't just go into the water?

Charlotte Kaufman
Right. Yeah. I think the hardest part for people who don't sail to really imagine about this trip is that you're constantly in motion. You're burning calories just by sitting because your body is constantly fighting to keep you in an upright position. We could never stand still.

When I'm making food, I have to brace my feet at a really far angle, or I had to wear a belt, a galley belt, just to stay upright. We would have to-- our youngest daughter, she slept in a little chair, a little kid seat, strapped down in her bunk because, if we had just put her in her berth, her body would literally have been just rolling five inches. Rolling five inches. Rolling, because she was too little to lay spread eagle and brace herself at night to sleep.

Ira Glass
Now, to get broached by itself is not such a big deal. Eric says lots of boats get broached.

Eric Kaufman
Yeah. I mean, you want to minimize it as much as you possibly can. And you probably did something wrong, or you could have been more active on the helm, or something like that. But it's not like, oh, my gosh, this is horrible. No boat has ever experienced this. That's not the case. It's sailing across an ocean. It's what it is. If you don't want to take hits like that, don't go across an ocean.

Spleen 18-05-2014 18:51

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MarkJ

Last time I posted some reply about keeping your speed down on long passages to hull speed a whole bunch of people then started going on about them doing 14 knots yada yada... Of course they were only doing 14 down one lucky massive surfing wave otherwise they would be sailing 340nms per day. But what they are doing is running a boat physics says can do 8 knots and the manufactures design a rudder for 10 knots down a wave at 14, obviously OUT of control.

That is what I figured. It sounds out of control.

tomfl 18-05-2014 19:12

Re: Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Palarran (Post 1544295)
So are you saying you can sail your seawind fast enough to stay on a wave? Incredible. I've had my boat accelerate on waves but they have always overtaken me.

I'm going to guess you know the answer to the first question with a spinnaker.

No I am not saying a big boat (my Seawind included) is not overtaken by waves. What I am saying is it is possible to keep surfing longer on a wave and keep the boat at the surfing speed longer and it is also possible to reduce the time spent surfing on a single wave.

If you watch one design dingy races some skippers make a great effort to stay surfing as long as possible. I spent a lot of time windsurfing when I was younger and it is critically important to control how long you are surfing on a wave. I also was a surfer when I was a kid. One thing you learn quickly as a surfer is when to bail out to avoid a wipe out.

But speed is not the only reason to learn to surf your boat. My biggest reason is safety considerations. Wiping out on a surf board is no fun, but wiping out in a cruising boat can be a disaster.


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