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-   -   Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled (https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f74/affordable-care-act-catastrophic-plans-cancelled-114645.html)

PamlicoTraveler 03-11-2013 02:58

Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
There was a thread dealing with ACA and "Obamacare" that was closed down by the moderators because of sniping and politics in the thread. THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT ISSUE AFFECTING CRUISERS LIVING ABOARD IN OTHER COUNTRIES.

We had a "catastrophic" care plan by Blue Cross Blue Shield that had a $10,000 deductible. We have never reached the deductible, so essentially this is just money we spent to insure against a catastrophic illness. We paid about $650 per month. That plan is not considered ACA compliant, so it has been cancelled, and the "mapped plan" with its "added benefits" (that we will never use) is $1,200 per month. This borders on making cruising impractical.

I understand that if you live out of the country for 330 days a year, you can get an exemption from buying a policy, but we spend 60-90 days in the US, depending on circumstances. We are considering going "naked," with NO insurance at all, for the first time in our lives. It seems like the opposite effect of what is intended. It's a not a good choice, but it may be what allows us to stay out here. We will pay a penalty, initially of 1% of income from what I understand. And that penalty is, of course, for nothing. If we get cancer or seriously sick in some way we will not have coverage.

For routine care I find the European system to be fine. We are now in Turkey and health care is affordable and available. Still, like many others, if I get seriously sick I want to go "home" for treatment.

I am interested in what others see as the best options. Stay away from opinions and politics so we can discuss this important issue.

Dockhead 03-11-2013 04:35

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
This is indeed an extremely important issue for cruisers.

Please limit the discussion to practical solutions of this question and leave your politics at the door. Political ranting will be immediately deleted and sanctions will be issued without warning.

Pete7 03-11-2013 04:54

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by PamlicoTraveler (Post 1381219)
THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT ISSUE AFFECTING CRUISERS LIVING ABOARD IN OTHER COUNTRIES.

No, this only affects US citizens living abroad, the rest of the worlds citizens aren't affected. My taxes help pay for a national health service which is free to use and has reciprocal arrangements across Europe for emergency treatment. Quite a good deal all round for those eligible.

You might want to have a look at the Divers "DAN" cover, it's been a while since I looked at it but it did provide some interesting cover in an emergency.

Pete

transmitterdan 03-11-2013 05:06

Since the preexisting condition limitation is gone can you go "naked" and if something happens sign up then?

Dockhead 03-11-2013 05:14

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by transmitterdan (Post 1381263)
Since the preexisting condition limitation is gone can you go "naked" and if something happens sign up then?

A very interesting question.

I have been going "naked" for the 22 years I have been an expat (this time), and haven't needed a doctor in all that time, but how long can my luck hold out?

Granted, I have been in Europe all this time, where paid health care, even for catastrophic situations, is generally reasonable in price, so that I could probably pay for most eventualities myself (I guess that's called "self-insuring").

I realize that I'm now going to have to take some time and study the new system. I'll be interested to see what advice people come up with on here.

And with apologies to all non-US citizens, who don't face this issue. Move along now, nothing to see here :)

transmitterdan 03-11-2013 05:18

One company to contact would be Aflac. I'm not sure how the new system affects them but they offered insurance that wasn't considered "medical". All of the payouts would be to the policy holder or designated second beneficiary.

KNoel 03-11-2013 05:25

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Pamlico Traveler, this sure is an important topic for cruisers and I wish I could offer some advice. I am just happy that my BCBS plan appears to be one of the "grandfathered" ones and only went up 75.00 a month!

It's not every day I see someone from Creedmoor, so I HAD to just reply and say that I live right down the road in the Enon Community. Small world!

charliehows 03-11-2013 05:32

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
as an australian citizen i have never spent a cent on health insurance. But over the years ive had to seek medical treatment and its always been first class and free when ive needed it. There has been a fair amount of politicking in the last few years to put a stop to this uncivilized state of affairs but so far they havent had much impact. I dont understand the system over there but i cant see it having any affect on non US citizens.

Captain Bill 03-11-2013 05:40

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Traveler;
It's not clear from your post but I'll assume that you are buying coverage from BCBS of NC. I was a former resident of NC and was shocked to find out that health care coverage was not nearly as expensive in other states. I'm on my way down the east coast now and was discussing this issue with another cruiser here in NC and was told that BCBS is the only provider in NC so there is no competition. Two years ago we "moved" to Florida and are now residents of that state. Our address is at the SBI Mail Service in Green Cove Springs. As such we can buy insurance in Florida and the rates are dramatically lower. You don't say how many people you are covering, but I can buy a very good plan for about $450 per person per month and catastrophic plans ($6500 deductable) for less than $200 per month. Perhaps you should consider "moving" to another state while you are out of the country.

capngeo 03-11-2013 05:43

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by charliehows (Post 1381270)
I dont understand the system over there but i cant see it having any affect on non US citizens.

Exactly, it has no effect on non-US cruisers.

My policy has remained in force, my wife's was cancelled..... We are waiting on the other shoe to drop to find out what it will cost.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Transmitterdan
One company to contact would be Aflac. I'm not sure how the new system affects them but they offered insurance that wasn't considered "medical". All of the payouts would be to the policy holder or designated second beneficiary.

I see no such offering on Afflac's web site, do you have more info?

Paul L 03-11-2013 06:24

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
So have you tried to apply for the ACA subsidized policies? Of course it depends on your family income. For a family of 2 making up to about 55 or $60k, you get a decent discount on the policy. For us, the policy monthly cost (Washington state) will be much lower than the $10k deductible BC policy we have been been carrying. That's assuming I can actually finish the application process.

captainjay 03-11-2013 06:27

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
My wife and I are covered by a employer plan, but there has been so much info flying about I looked into the options. It looks like the bronze plan which is a 60/40 split with a max out of pocket of about 6300 a year isn't very different than a catastrophic plan like you had actually it is better coverage. Unless you have a six figure taxable income then the tax subsidies seem to bring it back down in line with what you are already paying.

For that plan two adults aged 55 non smokers the premium is $13,254. The tax credit with a $50,000 income would be $8504 bringing the annual cost to $4750. Or $395 dollars a month.

Subsidy Calculator | The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

Jay

Paul L 03-11-2013 06:46

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by captainjay (Post 1381308)
.... Unless you have a six figure taxable income then the tax subsidies seem to bring it back down in line with what you are already paying.

For that plan two adults aged 55 non smokers the premium is $13,254. The tax credit with a $50,000 income would be $8504 bringing the annual cost to $4750. Or $395 dollars a month.

...
Jay

Which would be about 40% less than what the current high deduct policy costs us.

rebel heart 03-11-2013 07:02

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
You can buy an expat policy for this year, and probably for many subsequent that will satisfy the individual mandate. Bupa is a good example and common in Europe.

The sky is not falling.

Rebel Heart - Eric's Blog - the affordable care act (obamacare) and cruising*sailors

Dockhead 03-11-2013 07:12

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by rebel heart (Post 1381332)
You can buy an expat policy for this year, and probably for many subsequent that will satisfy the individual mandate. Bupa is a good example and common in Europe.

The sky is not falling.

Rebel Heart - Eric's Blog - the affordable care act (obamacare) and cruising*sailors

Hi Eric:

That's a very nice and useful blog post about this issue.

One small quibble: you talk a lot about the "Physical Presence Test" for purposes of qualifying for the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion. Keep in mind that that is not the only way to qualify as a resident abroad -- there is also the Bona Fide Residence Test, which is an alternative to the Physical Presence Test. See: Foreign Earned Income Exclusion - Bona Fide Residence Test.

That's the one I have used for the last 22 years, although I probably always also meet the Physical Presence Test.

CarlF 03-11-2013 07:28

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
ACA cost is very sensitive to income. If you make a lot if money, you pay a lot. If, like most cruisers, you make little income -- it seems to be a great deal.

I checked the Rhode Island ACA site.

https://www.healthsourceri.com

A 58 year old couple making $40,000 a year would pay $3.12 a month (yes that's $3) for the cheapest plan. This has a $5000 deductible so it would work like a catastrophic plan. But unlike a traditional catastrophic plan, after your reach the out-of-pocket max of $6350, the insurance pays 100% of everything with no co-pays or limits. Incredibly good coverage. So your maximum cost a year for medical care is less than $6400 ($535/month). Of course, if you don't get sick during the year, it's almost free.

If you make over $40,000 then the cost goes up quickly to a maximum for a couple of $882/month.

So, if you make more than $40,000 now, then it would seem to make sense to try and shift some savings into non-taxable vehicles such as municipal bonds or investments that have deferred income ( like stocks with no dividends) to keep your taxable income down.

Paul L 03-11-2013 07:34

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by rebel heart (Post 1381332)
.... Bupa is a good example and common in Europe.
.....

Like most ex-pat policies sold to US residents, the pre-existing conditions are excluded. Many of these type policies have onerous pre-existing condition terms.

rebel heart 03-11-2013 07:36

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Dockhead (Post 1381337)
Hi Eric:

That's a very nice and useful blog post about this issue.

One small quibble: you talk a lot about the "Physical Presence Test" for purposes of qualifying for the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion. Keep in mind that that is not the only way to qualify as a resident abroad -- there is also the Bona Fide Residence Test, which is an alternative to the Physical Presence Test. See: Foreign Earned Income Exclusion - Bona Fide Residence Test.

That's the one I have used for the last 22 years, although I probably always also meet the Physical Presence Test.


I think, and there is still confirmation coming back from the IRS, that it's only the physical presence test that matters. Correct me if I'm wrong, but the bona fide residence test only verifies that another nation declares me as a resident, right? I could still be in the US for 331 days and pass the bona fide residence test, I think.

This block from the IRS is where I see it as just being the physical presence:

Quote:

12. Are US citizens living abroad subject to the individual shared responsibility provision?

Yes. However, U.S. citizens who live abroad for a calendar year (or at least 330 days within a 12 month period) are treated as having minimum essential coverage for the year (or period). These are individuals who qualify for an exclusion from income under section 911 of the Code. See Publication 54 for further information on the section 911 exclusion. They need take no further action to comply with the individual shared responsibility provision.

rebel heart 03-11-2013 07:38

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Paul L (Post 1381348)
Like most ex-pat policies sold to US residents, the pre-existing conditions are excluded. Many of these type policies have onerous pre-existing condition terms.

Doesn't matter. At least for the next year, until they can provide better guidance, any expat policy that's a group plan (as opposed to you and your two friends squirreling away some cash) that requires you to be out of the country for six months counts.

https://www.dol.gov/ebsa/faqs/faq-aca13.html

Quote:

For purposes of this temporary transitional relief, an expatriate health plan is an insured group health plan with respect to which enrollment is limited to primary insureds who reside outside of their home country for at least six months of the plan year and any covered dependents, and its associated group health insurance coverage.

Dockhead 03-11-2013 07:42

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by rebel heart (Post 1381350)
I think, and there is still confirmation coming back from the IRS, that it's only the physical presence test that matters. Correct me if I'm wrong, but the bona fide residence test only verifies that another nation declares me as a resident, right? I could still be in the US for 331 days and pass the bona fide residence test, I think.

This block from the IRS is where I see it as just being the physical presence:

It looks to me like it's linked to the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion:

"[A]n applicable individual is treated as having MEC for purposes of health care reform for any month during which either:
The individual’s foreign residency or physical presence in a
foreign country or countries qualifies him for the foreign earned
income exclusion."

https://www.bakermckenzie.com/files/P...gehc_jun13.pdf


Which would mean that either bona fide residency or physical presence would do it.

However, considering how new this legislation is and how much chaos has surrounded it, people should be very careful and get professional advice before relying on any one or two sources.

Sam Plan B 03-11-2013 07:42

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
I have a helath insurance policy with Kaiser Permanente. It has an $8,000 deductable and costs me about $200 a month. I am 63 with no health issues (knock on wood). And I got a letter from Kaiser that stated my policy was Obamacare compliant. So far so good. However if things change and Kaiser is forced to cancel my policy due to a government mandate, well, its a big world out there.

rebel heart 03-11-2013 07:59

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Dockhead (Post 1381356)
It looks to me like it's linked to the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion:

"[A]n applicable individual is treated as having MEC for purposes of health care reform for any month during which either:
The individual’s foreign residency or physical presence in a
foreign country or countries qualifies him for the foreign earned
income exclusion."

https://www.bakermckenzie.com/files/P...gehc_jun13.pdf


Which would mean that either bona fide residency or physical presence would do it.

However, considering how new this legislation is and how much chaos has surrounded it, people should be very careful and get professional advice before relying on any one or two sources.

There was a guy from the previous (locked) thread who said he emailed the IRS and then ended up on the phone with them, because even they didn't have a solid answer regarding what the rules were. Hopefully he can write back on here with what he finds out when they respond.

It's funny because as a software and insurance guy, I have a lot of patience for both. And they're both playing out right now on the national stage. In both arenas my experience is that solutions come from dealing with lots of minutia and nuance; there are no silver bullets and even the most elegant solutions still have you mopping gore off the walls for three years.

Production software is a thankless job. We usually get treated like the power company and use the slogan, "No one thinks about the electric company until the lights don't work one day." At least we get paid okay.

JPA Cate 03-11-2013 08:12

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
I just wanted to say two things: first, Rebel Heart, thank you very much for posting this thread. It will be helpful for many of us. Secondly, it is the only thread so far during my participation on CF that I ever counted 20 other members reading it at the same time as me. Thanks again.

Ann

zeehag 03-11-2013 08:23

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
having been a non user of the medicare i was granted achieving my disability status in 2005, i hopè the medicare systemless is maintained at least fro a few more years....
i raised my kid sans insurance as i needed to feed his face while he grew.
i didnt have the option, as an rn to earn a retirement benefits, as i worked sans benefits to gain extra money monthly to feed and house my son and self, plus child care during my shift work.
any and all illnesses were treated by me with a lil help from good friends indabiz, as it were, so i didnt have to pay out that which i could not afford.
my sons pediatrician was a prepaid thing, and was easy to afford. no insurance, merely pay as go. every check up was 20 usd. not too shabby for real pediatrician. no t given reciprocity on these..had to pay in full, all 20 usd for each check up. including shots and meds. not allowed to do that anymore... is too bad, as it worked.
i feel for the souls today having to pay out so much money monthly -- this is ridiculous way to solve a problem that was truly not there, as noninsured were being treated as were insured, side by side, and the non insured were essentially covered by slush finding of hospitals, which was done to keep them from losing too much money over uninsured and indigent patients.
we have progressed, as it were, from freedom to practice good medicine at cheaqp rates to being ford¡ced to pay out so mucvh insurance monthly to `reclude ability to evvect pro bono services as used to be done. the mds have to pay out 100-200 thousand usdollars annyually for their own malpractice insurance. that makes the patients fees higher, DUUHH.
the only souls benefiting from these changes to forced insurance coverage is the insurance company and lobby. health care is not benefited, nor is the user of the systemless. in fact, both are being punished in the effecting of these insurance lobby sponsored laws.
good mds are leaving the profession, and the ones remaining are not being paid enough to pay their own malpractice insurance fees.
we see how long it will take to totally implode, as these are dependent on financing that does not exist in reality,and is iffy at best on ¨paper¨

Group9 03-11-2013 08:26

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by transmitterdan (Post 1381263)
Since the preexisting condition limitation is gone can you go "naked" and if something happens sign up then?

That seems to be the best loophole in it for young, healthy, people (like many cruisers). Just pay the fine, and sign up if you do get hurt or get sick with something that is going to have a lot of medical bills associated with it.

I know that's my 28 year old stepson's plan.

The problem is, with finding anybody, government or private, who can give you a definitive answer on anything about the ACA. My brother is a CPA in a very large firm and he says after studying the act for three years, they are hanging caveats all over their advice to their clients, because they really are not sure how a lot of the provisions are going to be interpreted, especially by the IRS.

lorenzo b 03-11-2013 08:31

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Just come on down to Panama, or Malaysia, or the DR. You can get old, sick, and die for pennies on the dollar and eat great food, lay about in the sun, and swim in some beautiful seas.
Why do cruisers rush back to the USA to get lousy medical care at ridiculously high prices?

Group9 03-11-2013 08:38

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by lorenzo b (Post 1381393)
Just come on down to Panama, or Malaysia, or the DR. You can get old, sick, and die for pennies on the dollar and eat great food, lay about in the sun, and swim in some beautiful seas.
Why do cruisers rush back to the USA to get lousy medical care at ridiculously high prices?

That's the plan! My wife, my brother in law, my sister in law, and I were sitting around last night talking about retiring to Panama. We put ourselves on a three year plan to do it last night.

The ACA, and Panamanian healthcare, was definitely in the conversation a lot. :D

Stu Jackson 03-11-2013 08:42

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Group9 (Post 1381390)
Originally Posted by transmitterdan https://cdn.cruisersforum.com/forums/...s/viewpost.gif
Since the preexisting condition limitation is gone can you go "naked" and if something happens sign up then?

That seems to be the best loophole in it for young, healthy, people (like many cruisers). Just pay the fine, and sign up if you do get hurt or get sick with something that is going to have a lot of medical bills associated with it.

I know that's my 28 year old stepson's plan.

Could someone explain how that would work?

I broke my leg skiing five years ago. There wasn't a whole lot of time between the break and surgery to fill out insurance applications.

Group9 03-11-2013 08:47

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Stu Jackson (Post 1381404)
Could someone explain how that would work?

I broke my leg skiing five years ago. There wasn't a whole lot of time between the break and surgery to fill out insurance applications.

No, if you find that person that can explain what is going to happen under the ACA, please turn us all on to him. The whole world is looking for him/her.

That's not political. That's the truth. Everyone is speculating at this point.

lorenzo b 03-11-2013 08:49

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
I would suggest you come down and look around for a year or so before committing to buying anything. It's very easy to arrange a long term rental almost anywhere and untimely much cheaper than insisting on the American dream of home ownership. And you can move around every few years.
If you go to Bocas, almost every expat home on the islands is for sale, and cheap, I might add. Stay loose.

sailorboy1 03-11-2013 09:17

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
It would seem that for a US cruiser living OUTSIDE the US that the only thing that has changed would be the fine (tax) you would owe for not having a ACA plan. My understanding is that fine is kind of small and there is nothing to stop one for getting some type of health insurance for major medical on the worldwide open market. It would seem to did depend on what excursions you are willing to have on your policy (like that you can not travel back to the US for treatment).

If the choice is between paying $400/mo etc more than what you are currently paying to get an ACA plan or to pay a fine of say $200/year to have some other plan that you are already using, well just pay the fine.

I've long known that the only way I could even afford to go cruising is to get out of the USA due to the health care cost issue.

Paul L 03-11-2013 09:38

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by rebel heart (Post 1381352)
Doesn't matter. At least for the next year, until they can provide better guidance, any expat policy that's a group plan (as opposed to you and your two friends squirreling away some cash) that requires you to be out of the country for six months counts.

https://www.dol.gov/ebsa/faqs/faq-aca13.html

What do you mean by doesn't matter? I'm buying a policy for health insurance, not to avoid a $95 penalty. Like they say,m never make investment decisions based on saving taxes.

Paul L 03-11-2013 09:40

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by sailorboy1 (Post 1381435)
It would seem that for a US cruiser living OUTSIDE the US that the only thing that has changed would be the fine (tax) you would owe for not having a ACA plan. My understanding is that fine is kind of small and there is nothing to stop one for getting some type of health insurance for major medical on the worldwide open market. It would seem to did depend on what excursions you are willing to have on your policy (like that you can not travel back to the US for treatment).

If the choice is between paying $400/mo etc more than what you are currently paying to get an ACA plan or to pay a fine of say $200/year to have some other plan that you are already using, well just pay the fine.

I've long known that the only way I could even afford to go cruising is to get out of the USA due to the health care cost issue.

But that isn't the choice for most. The facts will be different for each person based on circumstances. What has changed for many US based cruisers is that they can get a policy for much less than before and not have pre-existing conditions exclusions applied.

Paul L 03-11-2013 09:45

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Stu Jackson (Post 1381404)
Could someone explain how that would work?

I broke my leg skiing five years ago. There wasn't a whole lot of time between the break and surgery to fill out insurance applications.

Easy, you take pain meds till the next open enrollment period. With a little bit of luck it will be less than 6 months.

SV THIRD DAY 03-11-2013 09:51

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Paul L (Post 1381450)
Easy, you take pain meds till the next open enrollment period. With a little bit of luck it will be less than 6 months.

Or just call the Dr and tell them you are a Cash payer...I did it last week when I broke my foot. At first they were booked up, told them I was paying cash and I walked right in past the 8 people sitting in the waiting room and walked out with an X-ray and cast-boot for less than the deductable anyway. no drama...no forms...no govenment handouts or programs needed.:thumb:

In Training 03-11-2013 09:54

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Great Topic! Much appreciated.

Stugots 03-11-2013 10:02

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Group9 (Post 1381390)
That seems to be the best loophole in it for young, healthy, people (like many cruisers). Just pay the fine, and sign up if you do get hurt or get sick with something that is going to have a lot of medical bills associated with it.

I know that's my 28 year old stepson's plan.

The problem is, with finding anybody, government or private, who can give you a definitive answer on anything about the ACA. My brother is a CPA in a very large firm and he says after studying the act for three years, they are hanging caveats all over their advice to their clients, because they really are not sure how a lot of the provisions are going to be interpreted, especially by the IRS.

I've heard this strategy suggested by several people but I honestly don't understand the advantage. Isn't it better to just pay for healthcare rather than to pay a fine to have nothing? If you get hit by a car you'd be screwed. Seems like an extremely risky strategy... and not a free one either.

Stugots 03-11-2013 10:07

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by PamlicoTraveler (Post 1381219)
We had a "catastrophic" care plan by Blue Cross Blue Shield that had a $10,000 deductible. We have never reached the deductible, so essentially this is just money we spent to insure against a catastrophic illness. We paid about $650 per month. That plan is not considered ACA compliant, so it has been cancelled, and the "mapped plan" with its "added benefits" (that we will never use) is $1,200 per month. This borders on making cruising impractical.

Sorry if this has already been asked, but have you shopped around at all? $1200 is many times higher than any bronze plan I've heard quoted... it doesn't sound right. I went on and looked at costs for bronze plans in California and they were in the $200-300 range. If you're cruising I would imagine your income level is also low enough to get subsidies on top of that.

CatInHand 03-11-2013 10:43

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Group9 (Post 1381390)
That seems to be the best loophole in it for young, healthy, people (like many cruisers). Just pay the fine, and sign up if you do get hurt or get sick with something that is going to have a lot of medical bills associated with it.

I know that's my 28 year old stepson's plan..

Once the system is up and running, open enrollment will only be once a year without an insurance-changing event (like divorce or job loss). The stepson will need to plan to become ill in October and be able to hold out until January before seeking care.

Paul L 03-11-2013 10:53

Re: Affordable Care Act - catastrophic plans cancelled
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by SV THIRD DAY (Post 1381460)
Or just call the Dr and tell them you are a Cash payer...I did it last week when I broke my foot. At first they were booked up, told them I was paying cash and I walked right in past the 8 people sitting in the waiting room and walked out with an X-ray and cast-boot for less than the deductable anyway. no drama...no forms...no govenment handouts or programs needed.:thumb:

We have a friend who had an unexpected and rare heart issue this summer. The bills are still rolling in, but so far it has exceeded US$600,000. Cash, check or insurance? You pick.


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