Cruisers & Sailing Forums (https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/)
-   General Sailing Forum (https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f2/)
-   -   Keeping Watch at Night ? (https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f2/keeping-watch-at-night-109186.html)

boatman61 13-08-2013 04:11

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Why do folk assume a collision leads to the Criminal Courts... or any Court come to that... :rolleyes:
I got T-Boned by a fully crewed sailboat in daylight that then backed away under motor to a distance covering his name on the stern before steaming off into the distance despite my request for help or at least a tow to Salcombe 10 miles away...
I'd been at sea for 47 days.. had no elecs due to a lightening strike 1000 odd miles earlier hence no radio or engine... my Genoa was ripped up the luff as a result of the impact... being poled out at the time to try and catch the faint breeze from astern.. the hull deck joint was split along an 18ft length and there was a vertical split in the hull 3ft long from deck level down... the boat was a Bendi 321...
I found my mobile and switched it on.. luckily it still had some charge so I called 999 and got put through to the CG who put out a call to boats in the neighbourhood to lend assistance as I felt trying to sail with that damage may bring the mast down... oh... and I already had emergency rope lowers from the wires popping during the strike..
Anyway... the Salcombe Lifeboat came out and towed me in... the hit and run was caught trying to sneak into Salcombe 3hr's after dark... and while I was chatting with the HM and the CG man an owner of another fully crewed yacht came wandering down the pontoon and in that typical upper class English drawl said...
"Is this the chappie who needed a tow... Huh... I was 3 miles away when the call came and I thought... Bludi Fool... can't sail or start his engine... serves this silly fool right... shouldn't be at sea in the first place"...
Luckily the CG and HM grabbed me before I got to his throat else there definitely would have been a Court appearance...:p
Changed his tune when he learnt the facts.... however reading this Thread leads me to the conclusion that there's a few pompous folk of his ilk here... and likely one or two hit and runners as well..
There was no court case.. no police involved... not even for the 4 on the hit and run boat that left a vessel in distress...
But how people here can pass a seemingly deserted boat at sea without checking if all is well on board... then come on CF and shed crocodile tears over someone like Jay going over the side...
Man there's some seriously sad people out there...
You lot should just hope there's someone like me who'll happily go off course to check out something that does not seem right if you ever get into trouble..
Simply quoting COLREG's alongside Courts only serves to demonstrate the depth of your ignorance...:rolleyes:

Rant over... back to having a Larf...:p

PS; Being a recorded CG incident its on record.. boats name Mewa... in case anyone wants to check the BS factor... year Aug 2001

MarkJ 13-08-2013 05:21

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by goboatingnow (Post 1308991)

Quote:

person on watch cooks.
huh, whats happening when you're head is in the galley?

dave

Yes, Dave. The person ON-watch cooks.

Sleep is importnat for the off-watch crew and the on-watch crew needs to be active to keep alert. Bouncing up and down the compainwaiy certainly does that.

If they are so incompetant as a cook, or the cruising area so congested, then the off watch will just be on a diet, but at least well rested.

Note again: The CIA/armies etc uses sleep deprevation as a torture.... Note that well! No good sleeep is v bad :)




Mark

thomm225 13-08-2013 05:58

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kenomac (Post 1309811)
Just because someone labels themselves differently, does not make it OK for them to endanger the rest of us with their reckless behavior. Idiotic behavior is what makes one an idiot.

With the speed she made it around, I don't believe there was a lot of Heave Too (ing) going on while she slept. (And) It seems like she was applauded for her feat rather than being called derogatory names.

Jessica Watson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

10/8/2009 - 5/15/2010

No watch keeping for this guy either: (while he slept)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zac_Sunderland

Then there's James Baldwin, Robin Lee Graham, Tania Aebi .............

boatman61 13-08-2013 06:11

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Hey... come on... she nearly sank a big Chinese freighter on her warm up leg...:p

Mr B 13-08-2013 06:36

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Thats Funny Boatie, Hahahahaha

dugout 13-08-2013 06:38

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rakuflames (Post 1309766)
It is because of such language, which sounds vague to the laymen but will have clear meaning to lawyers and judges in a maritime court of law, that we laymen should not be making decisions based on our "understanding" of the law.

Why would you think words represent some sort of code in maritime law?
The words are purposely vague for everyone. That is what creates the room for debate and interpretation. That is the basis for the system.

JPA Cate 13-08-2013 07:03

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Hi, guys,

I think it's important to keep watch as well as possible, and to keep your boat lit at night.

IMO, there's nothing "idiotic" about shorthanded sailing. Such labeling is offensive. And honestly, reading through all these posts, with whom would you rather share an ocean:

the man who labels you "idiot"?

or the man who'll divert course to see if all's well?


Ann

jackdale 13-08-2013 07:04

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by RaymondR (Post 1309857)
In the version I have of the Colregs Rule 3: Definitions (f) states:

The term "vessel not under command" means a vessel which through some exceptional circumstance is unable to maneuver as required by these Rules and is therefor unable to keep out of the way of another vessel.

Whether or not it is appropriate to heave to and display the correct lights or shapes to indicate a "vessel not under command" whilst a single hander has a nap appears to depend upon whether the need to have the nap might be considered "exceptional circumstances". One might validly claim that in the instance of a severe nap attack there is insufficient competent crew to safely work the vessel. If the court accepted this one would only then have the problem of whether or not you should be out there by yourself in the first place.

While that is the definition, various guides to the Colregs provide interpretations:

Quote:

A vessel claiming not-under-command status must (1) find itself in exceptional circumstances, and (2) thereby be unable to maneuver as would ordinarily be required by the Rules. The following are examples of conditions that could result in not-under-command status:

Vessel with anchor down but not holding
Vessel riding on anchor chains
Vessel with inoperative steering gear
Sailing vessel becalmed or in irons
Exceptionally bad weather (relative to vessel claiming status)
Vessels claiming not-under-command status are considered to be underway. That is, they re not considered to be at anchor, made fast to the shore, or aground.
About the author's

Quote:

Chris Llana is a former Coast Guard officer with a B.S. in naval architecture and marine engineering and advanced degrees in marine affairs (MMA) and law (JD). During his tenure as a civilian at Coast Guard Headquarters, he drafted the annexes to the Inland Navigation Rules and wrote other regulations implementing both International and Inland Navigation Rules. Subsequent to that, he worked for Comsat Corporation on policy issues concerning the International Maritime Satellite Organization. He currently writes novels and maintains a web site on the U.S. transition to the ATSC digital TV standard.

George Wisneskey is a graduate of the Coast Guard Academy and holds a master's degree in education from the George Washington University. As chief of the Coast Guard's Rules of the Road Branch before his retirement in 1982, he oversaw the drafting of the Inland Navigational Rules Act of 1980. He is currently an active player in the Neuse River Foundation from his home base on North Carolina's coast.
Handbook of the Nautical Rules of the Road

goboatingnow 13-08-2013 09:13

Quote:

Originally Posted by Richard5 (Post 1309819)
Barney...Barney Rubble...rubble...rub. You have no rub with singlehanders, so I have that right?

Trouble , I have no trouble with singlehanders , ie barney rubble , trouble , shheesh what's happened to English.

Dave

goboatingnow 13-08-2013 09:15

Quote:

Originally Posted by MarkJ (Post 1309960)

Yes, Dave. The person ON-watch cooks.

Sleep is importnat for the off-watch crew and the on-watch crew needs to be active to keep alert. Bouncing up and down the compainwaiy certainly does that.

If they are so incompetant as a cook, or the cruising area so congested, then the off watch will just be on a diet, but at least well rested.

Note again: The CIA/armies etc uses sleep deprevation as a torture.... Note that well! No good sleeep is v bad :)

Mark

So the on watch , supposedly watching out and sailing , spends what 30-40 minutes in the galley. !!!

Dave

Paul Elliott 13-08-2013 09:29

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by goboatingnow (Post 1310243)
So the on watch , supposedly watching out and sailing , spends what 30-40 minutes in the galley. !!!

Perhaps while they're in the galley they pop their head up every five minutes for a 360-degree scan? That sounds pretty responsible to me...

goboatingnow 13-08-2013 10:01

Quote:

Originally Posted by Paul Elliott (Post 1310258)

Perhaps while they're in the galley they pop their head up every five minutes for a 360-degree scan? That sounds pretty responsible to me...

Soufflés take more concentration then that.!

Dave

atoll 13-08-2013 10:55

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
what i'm really pissed off about is all the abandoned yachts crossing oceans with nobody on watch.......or onboard.............

Richard5 13-08-2013 11:10

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by goboatingnow (Post 1310239)
shheesh what's happened to English.

Dave

The Brits tried to colonize it.

Richard5 13-08-2013 11:12

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Paul Elliott (Post 1310258)
Perhaps while they're in the galley they pop their head up every five minutes for a 360-degree scan? That sounds pretty responsible to me...

Three head pops and the grits oughta be cooked.

What is this, prairie dogs onna boat ride?

Stu Jackson 13-08-2013 11:14

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Richard5 (Post 1310381)
Three head pops and the grits oughta be cooked.

What is this, prairie dogs onna boat ride?

Whack-a-mole! :popcorn:

svBeBe 13-08-2013 11:15

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kenomac (Post 1308793)
Expanding on my previous note, yesterday morning about 6am, just as the sun was coming us we found ourselves heading towards some knucklehead who was obviously doing as the OP has described. We took evassive action to avoid a head-on collision with his or her 40ft sailboat four miles off Formentera which had it's sails set in a hove-to arrangement while sailing on a broad reach. What caught our attention, was that the vessel did not appear on our radar screen (it needed a minor adjustment) and no... it was not transmitting AIS and neither were we, and nobody was on deck. But we were on deck keeping watch and able to avoid the other boat. He probably went to bed at the tail end of a long passage and set his boat up in a hove to but apparently left his auto pilot on, so now his boat was continuing to sail towards the island at about 2-3 knots with a back winded genoa.

Eventually his luck will run out... hopefully, he woke up before running into the island which also wasn't broadcasting AIS.

Excuse me, but you did not wake him up?

Bill

Dos Gatos 13-08-2013 11:18

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by goboatingnow (Post 1308991)
huh, whats happening when you're head is in the galley?
dave

Delicious food.

Singlehanders do what singlehanders do and talking about it only annoys the rank and file.

boatman61 13-08-2013 11:31

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
The thing that tickles me is... last time I was in the Azores there were something like 270 odd boats came through during my 7 weeks in Horta... only 3 of us were single handing... kinda puts the 1 in 6 chance a bit more in perspective... especially as in 2200 miles I saw only one ship... dunno where this busy shipping area comes from.. in 3 crossings grouped over 4 years I saw maybe 7 ships in total... night and day..
Yes... this may come as a surprise.. we spend time up top after dark.. drowse a bit.. star gaze a bit.. drowse some more then around 4am actually hit the sack till dawn.. I find that's when I kinda fold..
Something to do with Bio rhythms.. I call it.. feeling cold..:p

goboatingnow 13-08-2013 11:48

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

especially as in 2200 miles I saw only one ship
Correction , in 2200 miles, while you were awake and looking around you, you saw only one ship….:p

dave

captain58sailin 13-08-2013 11:50

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
I met two couples that sailed together on two separate vessels from Australia to Alaska, and when we talked about their routine, they would douse the sails to make tea during the day and at night would put out a sea anchor and go to sleep, then in the morning haul in the sea anchor and get underway. No close calls and they were able to stay close enough to each other to arrive in port on the same day. Like the other ne er do wells here when I single hand, which is most of the time, I nod at the wheel for short periods. It is a right place and time thing. I don't go below to the bunk unless at anchor. If I were going to go for a lay down, I would douse the sails and put out a sea anchor, keep the lights on. With crew, you can do a 6 hour on 6 hour off rotation for a long time, or 3 and 3, I've known some who do an 8 and 8. Seems like this subject comes up on a fairly regular basis. Maybe the OP could take a look at previous threads, this one pretty much looks like a retread of the last one on this subject, same opinions by the same posters. Me included : ))

barnaclejim 13-08-2013 22:50

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
hey Sailors , just a thought about watches on long passages. We are usually just two on passages up to 4 days but often take crew on longer crossings. I found that a spring loaded timer that you set for 10 ot 15 min clutched tightly to your chest. When nothing is happening and its 3 am or so , allows me to close my eyes and rest. I have never fallen asleep and always open my eyes way before the timer goes off, and feel rested and especially in my eyes , which after several days of open too much feel like they have sand and corruption in them. It surprised me how much rest I can get that way. I otherwise did not allow myself to close my eyes or I might drop off and then wake with that adrenalyn rush that makes you bolt upright and say Sheeit whos commin? This works well for us on a quiet peaceful night passage

noelex 77 14-08-2013 01:17

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
My wife and I always sail without crew.

I don't believe offshore there is a need to keep lookout continuously in the sense that you cannot go down and get a meal, coffee, put on warm clothes, or even read a book. (Note at night you need to preserve your dark adaptation as much as possible)
However a good horizon scan needs to be done regularly.
In practice watching the sea and stars slide by is one the great joys of sailing, so for us time in the cockpit is the most common.

With two able crew there is absolutely no need to go to sleep, or even be sleepy on watch. You should be able to get plenty of sleep off watch with two crew. A priority when off watch is to sleep.
My wife and I use a simple watch schedule. Instead of formal, timed watches we stay on watch until sleepy then swap. This can be one hour, or 10 hours.
If off watch and we wake up the question is to on watch person "can you go to sleep" if yes we swap.

Sleep is vital offshore with only a two person crew. Sleepy people make mistakes. Staying well rested means there is plenty of reserve if a problem arises.

Of course singlehanded sailors don't have this luxury and must accept some combination of reduced lookout and sleep deprivation. In boats with a larger crew a good lookout with well rested crew is easy to achieve. With two people try to find a system that works for you and achieves the same proficiency as a larger crew.

Try the variable watch schedule, it works for us.

noelex 77 14-08-2013 01:32

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Some boats do make it difficult for themselves. An important, but often neglected priority in an offshore boat is to have easy 360 degree visibility. Preferably from a reasonably sheltered location.

Also try to set up night illumination so that dark adaptation can be preserved.

AIS and radar are great tools, but vision is still king.

carstenb 14-08-2013 02:11

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by noelex 77 (Post 1311012)
My wife and I always sail without crew.

I don't believe offshore there is a need to keep lookout continuously in the sense that you cannot go down and get a meal, coffee, put on warm clothes, or even read a book. (Note at night you need to preserve your dark adaptation as much as possible)
However a good horizon scan needs to be done regularly.
In practice watching the sea and stars slide by is one the great joys of sailing, so for us time in the cockpit is the most common.

With two able crew there is absolutely no need to go to sleep, or even be sleepy on watch. You should be able to get plenty of sleep off watch with two crew. A priority when off watch is to sleep.
My wife and I use a simple watch schedule. Instead of formal, timed watches we stay on watch until sleepy then swap. This can be one hour, or 10 hours.
If off watch and we wake up the question is to on watch person "can you go to sleep" if yes we swap.

Sleep is vital offshore with only a two person crew. Sleepy people make mistakes. Staying well rested means there is plenty of reserve if a problem arises.

Of course singlehanded sailors don't have this luxury and must accept some combination of reduced lookout and sleep deprivation. In boats with a larger crew a good lookout with well rested crew is easy to achieve. With two people try to find a system that works for you and achieves the same proficiency as a larger crew.

Try the variable watch schedule, it works for us.

We more or less follow this, but we use 3 hour watches. Although if we start getting tired and drowsy - swap! On the other hand, if you're wide awake and feeling fine - we let the other one sleep.

We do go below to make more coffee, put on a sweater, go to the head or whatever.

No reading working on pc though - when you are on watch - you are on watch.

Both of us simply enjoy watching the stars and moon - it is part of what cruising is all about. We don't think of it as sleep deprivation.

Sometimes we bunk down on the cockpit deck - we have a mattress that is especially sewn to fill 1/2 the cockpit. :D:D:D

RaymondR 14-08-2013 02:38

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Dear jackdale,

Lets throw in a hypothetical.

Lets assume that there are actually 3 people aboard and for dinner they had a meal of pelagic fish and it had ciguatera. We'll assume that before all of them became helpless one of them was able to heave the vessel to. All three of them are now helpless in their bunks. What lights and signals should they display?

It appears that the vessel is now not under command by way of a lack of competent crew and whilst this circumstance is not on you list it appears that it would justify signalling a "not under command" status for the vessel. If this is so the "not under command" status because the crew is too sleepy to safely work the vessel is also valid.

captain58sailin 14-08-2013 03:25

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
They have a neat device that many commercial fishers use, it is called a "Watch Alarm" It has a count down clock that can be set for what ever interval you decide. If you do not hit the reset button in time, there is an ear splitting alarm that goes off, guaranteed to wake the dead or dead asleep. You can even lock it to prevent tampering. If it is mounted where the helmsman has to get up and walk over to it to reset it helps keep the blood flowing. One skipper I knew made the helm seat out of a 2x6 screwed to the bulk head, and if you fell asleep, you would fall off of it.

thomm225 14-08-2013 03:38

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by boatman61 (Post 1310394)

especially as in 2200 miles I saw only one ship... dunno where this busy shipping area comes from.. in 3 crossings grouped over 4 years I saw maybe 7 ships in total... night and day..
Yes... this may come as a surprise.. we spend time up top after dark.. drowse a bit.. star gaze a bit.. drowse some more then around 4am actually hit the sack till dawn.. I find that's when I kinda fold..
Something to do with Bio rhythms.. I call it.. feeling cold..:p

I'm thinking a nap during the day would be good for singlehanders maybe around 2pm and then another one around 3-4am depending on the circumstances.

It would then be your call whether or not to heave to or continue at possibly a reduced speed. I don't sleep that well at anchor (always getting up to check things since I'm usually near land in a strong tide) so these naps would be interrupted quite a bit.

Btw, that Chinese Tanker that Jessica Watson ran over https://www.cruisersforum.com/images/icons2/icon_eek.gifwas on autopilot at the time.........

nigel1 14-08-2013 03:41

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by boatman61 (Post 1308937)
I have been T-Boned 5 miles of the coast by a boat motor sailing at 6kts with 4 crew on board... they were all below having cheese and wine... I was drifting and down below making cheese and toast...
Conclusion... CHEESE IS DANGEROUS...:banghead:
And yes... I do know the ColReg's...:whistling:

Me Mum used to tell me that eating cheese would give you nightmares, so that should wake you up.
Disappointed to find out that this may not be true.
Cheese unlocks your wildest dreams, says study

So eat the stilton, but avoid cheshire

Angel Louise 14-08-2013 04:47

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
THERE IS GREAT GEAR THAT WILL HELP SOLVE THIS PROBLEM.
We have been sailing and motoring ANGEL LOUISE as our only home as live-aboards for the last 6 years. We are now on the Portuguese Coast headed to London.

We always double hand on our passages. WE USE A WATCH COMMANDER. It is one of the best 10 pieces of much gear on the boat. We have used it for all six years. If the on watch crew does not push the OK button within the time period set indicating a scan of the horizon, it starts BEEPING a little louder than a kitchen timer for about a minute. THEN IT LETS OUT A SIREN ALARM of 130 DECIBELS +/- that EVERYONE ON THE BOAT WILL HEAR... If someone on watch is incapacitated, falls off or falls asleep, all on the boat know they will be advised shortly. Off watch we both sleep more soundly. We set ours for 15 minute periods on the open water. We love it. Makes the time pass faster. Also, when we are too sleepy to be alert, you know you can sleep that last five minutes after a look around as the BEEPER will rouse you, giving some peace of mind. In our talks to other cruisers at seminars or talks we always demo it and others tell me thanks later for alerting them to it, just as another cruiser did for us years ago! take a look at
Sail Safely - The Watch Commander passage timer
for details if interested... I have no connection with them.
Ed & Sue on ANGEL LOUISE

over40pirate 14-08-2013 05:06

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
When I was cruising, I also used a spring wound kitchen timer. I used a long ring one, not one that just went ding.

One time I was sailing and the timer went off. I woke up, and did a 360 check, and checked the sails. Everything looked good. I was about to go below for another 15 minutes, when I got a feeling something was not right.
I looked around again, and my dink I was towing, was alongside the boat!
Checked the knot meter, and sure enough I was aground in 48' of water.
Snagged a pot line between the keel and rudder. Only time for that.

Almost jumped in to get it free, before lowering sails!! Hey boat. Come back here!

boatman61 14-08-2013 05:22

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by thomm225 (Post 1311084)

Btw, that Chinese Tanker that Jessica Watson ran over https://www.cruisersforum.com/images/icons2/icon_eek.gifwas on autopilot at the time.........

Just about every vessel is in open waters these days... the Hollywood image of the bridgedeck with the officer saying Port 10... and the guy at the wheel saying Port 10 Sir... 10 of Port wheel on Sir.. are long past... from memory as I can't be bothered to look it up her boat was seen and ignored on the basis most small vessels stay outa the way.. when action was taken it was an inadequate 5* to Stbd... then when it was to late another 5* was ordered... a possibly fatal collision was avoided but still a collision... I feel if he'd altered by 10* at the start she'd just have wallowed in his wake... but that's just my opinion... and I'm no expert..;)

pcats1 14-08-2013 05:35

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
As a lifelong solo sailor, it is important to me at least, to maintain a comprehensive watch keeping schedule. Sleep discipline is possible when alone. Sleeping during the day is safer but still not for an hour or more.

A kitchen timer set for 15-20 minutes has served me well. It takes about 30 seconds to clear the horizon and then lay down for another stretch. Is this the same as a comfy two or three hour sleep? Of course not. It does, however, provide ample rest and your body adjusts to the intermittent "interruptions".




Quote:

Originally Posted by wkstar (Post 1308663)
With AIS, Radar, Sonar, AutoPilot etc
With One or Two people onboard do people just lower the sails and go to sleep
Or do people still do 3 hours watch ?

It seems to me that if the sails are low and you are not in the middle of a shipping channel. Then you should be able to get some sleep

With the gear I mentioned above a LOUD Alarm should go off if something were to approach the boat?
I am not saying take your Valium , Rum & zonk out for 10 hours.
Youtube makes it seem That going on a passage is a 20+ day prisoner of war No sleep torture test

Sailing is suppose to be relaxing, but with no sleep after a few days , I would get a bit cranky


boatman61 14-08-2013 06:01

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by pcats1 (Post 1311197)
As a lifelong solo sailor, it is important to me at least, to maintain a comprehensive watch keeping schedule. Sleep discipline is possible when alone. Sleeping during the day is safer but still not for an hour or more.

A kitchen timer set for 15-20 minutes has served me well. It takes about 30 seconds to clear the horizon and then lay down for another stretch. Is this the same as a comfy two or three hour sleep? Of course not. It does, however, provide ample rest and your body adjusts to the intermittent "interruptions".

Actually it takes a heavy toll on long voyages... Florida to Perth via Panama me + 1... I followed my usual routine... 4hrs sleep from 1am to 5am at sea... awake the rest of the time bar an occasional catnap in the day... often I'd be woken during the night... by the end of the trip I'd gone from 90kg down to 70kg... true there were many problems and stresses beyond the norm but it does take its toll...
Coasting where you can pull in and drop the hook or pull into a marina every couple of days when you feel a bit worn is something else... but a month at a time at sea... playing catch up.. it does take its toll and when you reach a port time is not spent laying on a beach.. its spent running around trying to get bits to fix the problems... and trying to second guess what's to come...
Soloing my boat is the opposite... its stress free and problem free...:thumb:

PS: Something else I've noticed over the years is... what folk say in Port and what they actually do at sea is quite different.. lol

thomm225 14-08-2013 06:40

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by boatman61 (Post 1311177)
Just about every vessel is in open waters these days... the Hollywood image of the bridgedeck with the officer saying Port 10... and the guy at the wheel saying Port 10 Sir... 10 of Port wheel on Sir.. are long past... from memory as I can't be bothered to look it up her boat was seen and ignored on the basis most small vessels stay outa the way.. when action was taken it was an inadequate 5* to Stbd... then when it was to late another 5* was ordered... a possibly fatal collision was avoided but still a collision... I feel if he'd altered by 10* at the start she'd just have wallowed in his wake... but that's just my opinion... and I'm no expert..;)

This link shows her mast broken and gives some details. I guess she was 16 years old at the time:

https://yachtpals.com/jessica-watson-7021

More info:

https://yachtpals.com/jessica-watson-collision-7050

I cross the Thimble Shoal Channel here in the Chesapeake Bay regularly. (you have to draw 27' to use that channel) There was a ship coming in a couple weeks back pushin a 6' - 8' bow wave. He was rollin' .............maybe 12-15 knots.

I had crossed the channel well ahead of him but had to run parallel to the channel for a while (so I got a really good look at that wave and his speed) due to tugs return from a dredging operation. They were pulling some derrick looking structures and about a 800' - 1000' worth of pipe connecting it all together.

thomm225 14-08-2013 06:48

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by pcats1 (Post 1311197)
As a lifelong solo sailor, it is important to me at least, to maintain a comprehensive watch keeping schedule. Sleep discipline is possible when alone. Sleeping during the day is safer but still not for an hour or more.

A kitchen timer set for 15-20 minutes has served me well. It takes about 30 seconds to clear the horizon and then lay down for another stretch. Is this the same as a comfy two or three hour sleep? Of course not. It does, however, provide ample rest and your body adjusts to the intermittent "interruptions".

Several guys doing the SingleHanded Transpac Race from San Francisco to Hawaii use this method also...........but being racers they also make adjustments to the sails for best speed.

boatman61 14-08-2013 07:04

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by thomm225 (Post 1311305)
This link shows her mast broken and gives some details. I guess she was 16 years old at the time:

Jessica Watson - Youngest Round Hopeful Collides at Sea | YachtPals.com

More info:

Jessica Watson Collision Report Released | YachtPals.com

I cross the Thimble Shoal Channel here in the Chesapeake Bay regularly. (you have to draw 27' to use that channel) There was a ship coming in a couple weeks back pushin a 6' - 8' bow wave. He was rollin' .............maybe 12-15 knots.

I had crossed the channel well ahead of him but had to run parallel to the channel for a while (so I got a really good look at that wave and his speed) due to tugs return from a dredging operation. They were pulling some derrick looking structures and about a 800' - 1000' worth of pipe connecting it all together.

And I've been dodging back and forth across the busiest Marine Highway in the world since the 80's... if a boat can't ride an 8-10ft wave... get a better boat... Sorry.

thomm225 14-08-2013 07:23

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by boatman61 (Post 1311354)
And I've been dodging back and forth across the busiest Marine Highway in the world since the 80's... if a boat can't ride an 8-10ft wave... get a better boat... Sorry.

Jeez, my fabric and aluminum frame 45lb 23" wide Cooper Folbot Kayak can ride that bow wave, I was talking about the speed of the ship in such tight confines. He just came over the tunnel 2 miles back and only had 5-6 miles to town.

https://www.folbot.com/Cooper_Kayak_p/cooper.htm

Andrew B. 14-08-2013 07:26

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by boatman61 (Post 1310394)
The thing that tickles me is... last time I was in the Azores there were something like 270 odd boats came through during my 7 weeks in Horta... only 3 of us were single handing... kinda puts the 1 in 6 chance a bit more in perspective... especially as in 2200 miles I saw only one ship... dunno where this busy shipping area comes from.. in 3 crossings grouped over 4 years I saw maybe 7 ships in total... night and day..
Yes... this may come as a surprise.. we spend time up top after dark.. drowse a bit.. star gaze a bit.. drowse some more then around 4am actually hit the sack till dawn.. I find that's when I kinda fold..
Something to do with Bio rhythms.. I call it.. feeling cold..:p

Cold and sleepy seems to be the bane of most on the LP's & OP's between about 3 & 6 AM, or so. Seems like those nasty Sgt's always did their rounds at these times. I sure had my enjoyment scaring the **** out of some dozing off FNG at 4:AM after I ascended to Sgt..

noelex 77 14-08-2013 07:32

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Angel Louise (Post 1311124)
We always double hand on our passages. WE USE A WATCH COMMANDER. It is one of the best 10 pieces of much gear on the boat. We have used it for all six years. If the on watch crew does not push the OK button within the time period set indicating a scan of the horizon, it starts BEEPING a little louder than a kitchen timer for about a minute. THEN IT LETS OUT A SIREN ALARM of 130 DECIBELS +/- that EVERYONE ON THE BOAT WILL HEAR...

Some autopilots will do this as well.


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:23.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.


ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.