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-   -   Keeping Watch at Night ? (https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f2/keeping-watch-at-night-109186.html)

skipmac 19-08-2013 07:03

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by zeehag (Post 1316588)
funny how all the tankers i have seen have their lights on at night, so far, gom and pacific--havent yet seen one sans nav lights.
i have come across cruisers sans lights, but not freighters sans lights.
and, of course the pangas with weird lights scattered off shore in darkness manning their drift nets and long lines...my favorite panga lites are from the buoys in mazatlan--they keep missing the flashing red lights...funny how these are seen on pangas at sea and drifting in old harbor.......


Hi Zee,

Not saying they are without nav lights, saying they are without deck lights, house lights and other lights like you see on a cruise liner.

No I have never seen any large vessel running without navigation lights but yes I have seen plenty of sailboats and small powerboats running dark.

Wotname 19-08-2013 07:49

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Geez Louise, 25 pages and 361+ posts just on keeping watch at night....

For the record, if I have to keep watch at night, I want to be on goboatingnow (Dave's) or Boatman61 (Phil's) boat.

OK, there are a couple of others and you know who you are - you are the ones who would be happy to sail with Dave or Phil at night :thumb:

Wrong 19-08-2013 07:53

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Wotname (Post 1316680)
Geez Louise, 25 pages and 361+ posts just on keeping watch at night....

For the record, if I have to keep watch at night, I want to be on goboatingnow (Dave's) or Boatman61 (Phil's) boat.

OK, there are a couple of others and you know who you are - you are the ones who would be happy to sail with Dave or Phil at night :thumb:

22 pages and 360 posts devoted to the discussion of lights and how they affect your ability to see - lights! Go figger.
:popcorn:

tropicalescape 19-08-2013 08:04

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by barnakiel (Post 1309286)
Personally, I do not allow my crew to read books on watch. No console games, no mp3 players, no joints, no beer, etc. Only the off watch one is free to do what they please but even they are required to get good rest so that they are 100% ready to grind if such a need arises. While on watch, everybody (on our boat) is expected to watch, keep eye on the boat and, if required, steer.

That's the general rule, I do agree that when the weather is good, boat sailing fine and the horizon has been scanned, it is OK to go down below to use the head, grab a jacket or put the kettle on.

Remember how the sat Gypsy Moth on that reef?

b.

No spliff,no beer,no watch!..lol

Therapy 19-08-2013 08:24

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Wotname (Post 1316680)
Geez Louise, 25 pages and 361+ posts just on keeping watch at night....

For the record, if I have to keep watch at night, I want to be on goboatingnow (Dave's) or Boatman61 (Phil's) boat.

OK, there are a couple of others and you know who you are - you are the ones who would be happy to sail with Dave or Phil at night :thumb:

I am not qualified to stand watch for most of them.

I would be put off at the next port for something I am sure.

I guess I will have to stick to coastal day sailing.

No point in looking at that boat in Sint Martin.

Crap!

boatman61 19-08-2013 08:37

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Therapy (Post 1316729)
I am not qualified to stand watch for most of them.

I would be put off at the next port for something I am sure.

I guess I will have to stick to coastal day sailing.

No point in looking at that boat in Sint Martin.

Crap!

LOL... never chucked anyone off a boat yet... scared em of for sure..:devil:
But the guy who fell asleep just got his watch rotated to 8pm-11.59pm... some of these old guys around 50 odd really struggle to stay awake after 9.30pm..:p

zeehag 19-08-2013 08:57

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
i am one of those who struggles at 0400 for about hour....however, as i was able to train myself to do --catnap for a few short minuets then wake an hour---works well..unless i have someone on board who thrives at that time, i will make it work. sleeping in cockpit as off watch backup also works in shorthanding while drifting in shipping areas.....
i heartily believe in lighting up sails when in darkness--nav lights are not only thing that declares what you are and that you are there---my nav lights light my jib beautifully, and i keep a high power flash light for the other sails--

Wrong 19-08-2013 09:03

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by zeehag (Post 1316765)
i am one of those who struggles at 0400 for about hour....however, as i was able to train myself to do --catnap for a few short minuets then wake an hour---works well..unless i have someone on board who thrives at that time, i will make it work. sleeping in cockpit as off watch backup also works in shorthanding while drifting in shipping areas.....
i heartily believe in lighting up sails when in darkness--nav lights are not only thing that declares what you are and that you are there---my nav lights light my jib beautifully, and i keep a high power flash light for the other sails--

Zeehag,

You sure seem to do a lot of 'drifting'. You are definitely not in a hurry, eh?:popcorn:

zeehag 19-08-2013 09:33

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Wrong (Post 1316773)
Zeehag,

You sure seem to do a lot of 'drifting'. You are definitely not in a hurry, eh?:popcorn:

i have all my life to do this lifestyle--what is the hurry---why stress and die whenye can enjoy this awesomeness.....
learned the fuel tank wasnt near big enough so we drift to make the difference when no wind---this is pacific ocean--there is either not enough wind or there is way too much. so far i have learned --known for a long time--i can handle big winds well.
i still need to learn when to and when not to whistle up a breeze by scratching my wooden masts and whistling tunes for the gods of wind and sea.:whistling:

there is a southerly drift on pacific side of earth which will eventually bring you close to somewhere with a decent anchorage in which to anchor and spend some quality time with locals.

Rakuflames 19-08-2013 09:38

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by carstenb (Post 1316390)
The correct english wording for being the person in charge of the boat is "Standing the watch". This does not refer to where you have your glutemus maximus parked.

I seriously doubt that anyone requires the person "Standing watch" to be physically standing. That would be rather asinine


What the person said was that it's smart to stand while at the helm sailing in difficult conditions. The reference was to boats with wheels and he pointed out that you'll feel things through your feet the way you feel things through the tiller.

I don't think anyone said that anyone on watch has to stand.

zeehag 19-08-2013 09:44

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
i am fortunate enough to have irregular nerve endings due collagen disorder which changes parasympathetic receptors and transmitters. i sense a change before it occurs. is a wonderful gift. strange but wonderful... i usually have 8 minutes to figure it all out before whatever it is gonna happen does. usually i am correct. there are witnesses--i allowed them to live as no one else would ever believe them

worked well at sports car races when i was in response ambulance.....
works well at sea and while stationary......
i am damlucky and very appreciative of that gift that keeps me in tune with whatever it is i am in tune with.
this gift has kept more than just me alive and healthy.

Rakuflames 19-08-2013 09:44

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by boatman61 (Post 1316449)
Dave... don't point 'Raku' in my direction mate... she's said it countless times... she's expert friends on the dock and will NEVER take my advice.... even as she was going down for the 3rd time...:p


No, I will double-check anything you say, it's true. There are people in my "real" life like that too. You wouldn't be anywhere near if I were going down for the third time. All we have here is land-based theory. And, I only said it once.

But just speaking generally -- I keep my guard up for BS and once I've spotted it, I do discount what that person says. I never take sailing advice either from the guy who told me with great confidence that a reefing system that consisted of manually putting a line through the kringle and tying it off under the boom at both ends was an adequate reefing system, either.

Rakuflames 19-08-2013 09:52

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by goboatingnow (Post 1316503)
what inflexible stand, I agree about going forward, but what you said was someone going below before someone was up .

inflexible and dogma are basically teh same thing. I apply common sense.



I tend to sail much farther then the bus routes

No, I didn't say anything about anyone going below. I haven't spoken about that at all.

And, I don't have a problem with it unless the person goes down and stays, essentially deserting his or her watch, a silly thing to be talking about.

I go below while single-handing all the time. That's where the head it, just for starters ... :)

What I said was that I wanted a second person in the cockpit before the first person "leaves the cockpit." We had been talking about someone going FORWARD, not down. It's easy to misunderstand someone. But I elaborated, saying that someone needed to know where to throw a line -- or at least take pictures (that part was a joke).

If I had someone on my boat who would be on watch alone and leave the cockpit to go forward, I have several problems with that. What's going wrong that he/she feels the need to go forward? Can they be absolutely certain the autopilot will keep them going true on their course and not suddenly lurch? No, they can't. I've seen that happen a number of times. One time the guy was way too close to me when it happened and he hit my boat. Someone standing on the bow might well have been thrown into the water.

I don't have a problem with going below for something. If that person doesn't know to scan the horizon 360 first, then I've done a bad job of training them or they're just pig-headed.

That's what I would put someone ashore for -- doing something foolish and reckless while standing watch after they've had this explained to them. Among other things, I would not feel I could trust that person to follow instructions in an emergency.

Rakuflames 19-08-2013 09:57

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by goboatingnow (Post 1316515)
SO it would seem Boatman, so it would seem and the worse she will be for it :thumb:

dave


There are plenty of other good people here, Dave, such as ... you ... who always give sound counsel. Someone here gave me really bad advice once, and I think that person had to know it was bad advice. I have seen sailors do this, and then laugh conspiratorially with the person next to them, saying "Watch this -- this is going to be good!"

I don't take advice from the people who were in on that, too. Actually before that incident happened, I followed advice from each of them at one time or another, and it was terrible advice.

Gotta keep your BS indicator tuned and in good shape.

Rakuflames 19-08-2013 10:02

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by goboatingnow (Post 1316524)
I must say to people that , think you have to be in the cockpit every minute of the watch , standing up , total attention, well your sailing must be confined to weekends. Nobody stands watch like that, and nobody needs to.

If you are that afraid of a crewman ( or yourself) to need that type of continuos attention, you need to reevaluate why you are sailing for fun.

close , heavy traffic, or racing, thats different, but we are talking here about the generality of cruising.

dave


But i don't think anyone actually said the person on watch had to stand. I completely agree with you about the total attention to everything. People don't drive that way. They take i the scenery automatically and their mind can be a thousand miles away, but they still see that car next to them start to move into their lane without looking, and they hit the horn or drive evasively or do whatever else they need to do (say, step on the gas) without even thinking about it. If you're in crowded waters you need to have more than one person on watch if possible, and very concentrated. But once you get to open waters, the other boats are going to stand our. Our brains are wired to see what's different and what's moving.

I think taking a stance like "you must be constantly watching everything" will contribute to crew fatigue (as well as a growing level irritation).

Wrong 19-08-2013 10:03

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rakuflames (Post 1316810)
What the person said was that it's smart to stand while at the helm sailing in difficult conditions. The reference was to boats with wheels and he pointed out that you'll feel things through your feet the way you feel things through the tiller.

I don't think anyone said that anyone on watch has to stand.

C'mon now, don't make me go back through the posts. I know what I read, and the poster said they require their crew on watch to stand. But, hey I could be Wrong! Again.:banghead:

Rakuflames 19-08-2013 10:05

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by skipmac (Post 1316546)
:thumb:

Not that it would be completely impossible to stand watch like this, but long passages, short handed it would be very wearing, take a lot of fun out of the trip and as you say, nobody needs to.

As long as someone is on deck most of the time, scans the horizon (full 360 including aft and behind the jib) every few minutes and keeps up with other standard watch requirements (check the bilges, gauges, etc) I see little to no benefit on having to stand up the whole watch, never leave the deck, never allowed to read.


I think you've got it all just right. I wouldn't have a problem with reading like that either. Either you trust the person, or you don't.

goboatingnow 19-08-2013 10:18

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Ok Raku, now w'all on the same page:flowers:

as to people giving you bad advice, sure that happens all the time, dont sweat it. Often its very hard to discern piss taking from advice on an Internet forum. ( I have to put on my shades every time Boatman writes :thumb:)



So , given the fact that several posters have no crew,

(a) They're anti social gits
(b) all their crew are on the bus
(c) or paid to fly home
(d) in hospital from standing for 3 weeks
(e) staving from living on nuts for a month

it must be just me and teh guy with the hammock out there with crew then!!!!:whistling:


dave

Rakuflames 19-08-2013 10:33

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by goboatingnow (Post 1316851)
Ok Raku, now w'all on the same page:flowers:

as to people giving you bad advice, sure that happens all the time, dont sweat it. Often its very hard to discern piss taking from advice on an Internet forum. ( I have to put on my shades every time Boatman writes :thumb:)



So , given the fact that several posters have no crew,

(a) They're anti social gits
(b) all their crew are on the bus
(c) or paid to fly home
(d) in hospital from standing for 3 weeks
(e) staving from living on nuts for a month

it must be just me and teh guy with the hammock out there with crew then!!!!:whistling:


dave


Oh that hammock is SWEET but I don't see any way to use it on my boat. DURN!

I really would have put one crew member on shore once if we hadn't been able to turn around. Do you *really* think it's unreasonable for the skipper to expect that crew will follow reasonable instructions? This guy argued about *everything,* including how deep the water was. (He aso wanted me to move the boat close to shore in a storm, and a bunch of other blockheaded things). I couldn't turn my back on him for a second. The other crew member had much less time over water but had done it much more intelligently, and if she wondered why we were doing something, she didn't just go off and do something completely different. She ... asked. What a concept.

I wouldn't have the guy who told me that rat-ass, jury-rigged "reefing system" was adequate on my boat, nor the guy who hit it because he was on autopilot asleep leaning up against the cabin side, nor the fellow who wanted to let the boat round up in too much wind and sea for my first boat because it was "fun."

There are also people who, when they sail with me, are the skipper, because I respect their knowledge AND can trust them to not take stupid risks with my boat they wouldn't on their own. I know I will learn from them. But I'm not a bad sailor myself and I make good calls in a pinch.

I don't sweat bad advice, and I know enough now to recognize it when I hear it/read it. But on line and in person I have seen people deliberately give bad advice because they find it entertaining, or they're annoyed or whatever, and I don't respect those people.

zeehag 19-08-2013 10:48

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
hammocks on smaller boats hang well between main mast and headstay.

my boat requires an inner forestay or a temp babystay for installation of same hammock.

i am happier in my cool comfortable aft cockpit with a cooling tropical breeze blowing across my sofa....unfortunately those breezes are too soft for sailing here..

Wrong 19-08-2013 10:53

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by goboatingnow (Post 1316851)
Ok Raku, now w'all on the same page:flowers:

as to people giving you bad advice, sure that happens all the time, dont sweat it. Often its very hard to discern piss taking from advice on an Internet forum. ( I have to put on my shades every time Boatman writes :thumb:)



So , given the fact that several posters have no crew,

(a) They're anti social gits
(b) all their crew are on the bus
(c) or paid to fly home
(d) in hospital from standing for 3 weeks
(e) staving from living on nuts for a month

it must be just me and teh guy with the hammock out there with crew then!!!!:whistling:

dave

And then there is always the possibility there are among us some who just don't have what's necessary to sail alone. Skill, cojenes and ability to be alone for long periods of time. Makes you wonder if they could even stand themselves without the diversion of having others around.:devil:

goboatingnow 19-08-2013 11:10

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

I really would have put one crew member on shore once if we hadn't been able to turn around. Do you *really* think it's unreasonable for the skipper to expect that crew will follow reasonable instructions? This guy argued about *everything,* including how deep the water was. (He aso wanted me to move the boat close to shore in a storm, and a bunch of other blockheaded things). I couldn't turn my back on him for a second. The other crew member had much less time over water but had done it much more intelligently, and if she wondered why we were doing something, she didn't just go off and do something completely different. She ... asked. What a concept.

I wouldn't have the guy who told me that rat-ass, jury-rigged "reefing system" was adequate on my boat, nor the guy who hit it because he was on autopilot asleep leaning up against the cabin side, nor the fellow who wanted to let the boat round up in too much wind and sea for my first boat because it was "fun."
Jeepers Raku, A lot of sh1t happens to you, I must stay well away:p

dave

barnakiel 19-08-2013 11:14

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Wrong (Post 1316873)
And then there is always the possibility there are among us some who just don't have what's necessary to sail alone. Skill, cojenes and ability to be alone for long periods of time. Makes you wonder if they could even stand themselves without the diversion of having others around.:devil:

You make it sound like soloists are some sort of heroes, some sort of the real thing (skill, cojenes (cojones)).

But I know many single-handers, and from this (small) sample I can tell you this is not the case. They roughly fall into one of two broad groups:

- they sail alone, because they like to be alone,
- they sail alone, because no one can stand them.

I think only the former ones are proper. The latter group always seek companion, sailing partners, whatever.

There is no merit in being blonde, neither in liking to sail alone.

b.

goboatingnow 19-08-2013 11:19

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
actually most singlehanders Ive met , sail alone cause they couldn't get a permanent other crew person , ( like the wife/GF) . Also explains why the two 'man' crew is also common.

Blue Crab 19-08-2013 11:27

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Wrong (Post 1316873)
And then there is always the possibility there are among us some who just don't have what's necessary to sail alone. Skill, cojenes and ability to be alone for long periods of time. Makes you wonder if they could even stand themselves without the diversion of having others around.:devil:

I have a general distrust of people who need constant diversion. Are their brains devoid of thoughts? I don't need or tolerate "background noise." I know many folks who feel like they must talk all the time. A few are men but most are women, I am truly sorry to report.

As a single and devilishly handsome, slim and trim old guy I get a lot of attention from elderly widows but I'd rather go without the other benefits than listen to idle claptrap. :cool:

Dockhead 19-08-2013 11:34

Quote:

Originally Posted by capngeo

Red over red, the Captain is dead..... yup 10 days with a 19yo would do it:whistling:

My boat has few electronic goodies. My sounder is a simple two digit readout (and a lead line as a back-up), no RADAR, no AIS, no Plotter (well to be fair, my iPad is sort of like a plotter), Hell, I don't even own an EPIRB!

FWIW, on a long solo (I call anything over 24 hrs as long when solo), I heave-to/anchor on the same sleep schedule as on land... I sleep when tired!

If I have one extra person, we do 4hr watches, but sleep in the cockpit at night...tethered (even in benign weather)

3 or more crew is 4 on / 6 off with one of the "off" crew awake at all times in the dark..... we usually do this by sleeping 4 of the 6 off hours. Of course all the above require mandatory log entries at 15 minute intervals with position.

The older I get, the less attractive overnight passages are to me!:banghead:

I don't mind overnight passages at all. Actually, I love night sailing. Life is too short, however, as far as I'm concerned, to do it short handed. Three people capable of sailing the boat is minimum for comfort, in my view, for a longer passage. What, don't you guys have that many friends you can muster for something which is this much fun? We were five-up for this year's summer cruise - alas, two empty bunks.

highseas 19-08-2013 11:40

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Have heard of singlehanders who announce position and heading over vhf to warn vessels nearby,before napping.

goboatingnow 19-08-2013 11:46

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by highseas (Post 1316911)
Have heard of singlehanders who announce position and heading over vhf to warn vessels nearby,before napping.

VHF and the cone of protection ., hmm fantasy role playing

Wrong 19-08-2013 11:46

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by highseas (Post 1316911)
Have heard of singlehanders who announce position and heading over vhf to warn vessels nearby,before napping.

Whether single handing or with crew if your vessel is hove-to or disabled in an area with heavy traffic, it is good practice to announce to all stations your position, speed and direction of travel. No matter the reason.:whistling:

goboatingnow 19-08-2013 11:52

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
in my experience, calling out Lat Lons to shipping is a waste of time. With modern bridges, the OOW seems to have little ability or desire to plot a lat lon.

dave

highseas 19-08-2013 12:18

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
There's also the singlehander buddy boat system ,where each take turn sleeping,while other watches for ships.

Wrong 19-08-2013 12:20

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by highseas (Post 1316941)
There's also the singlehander buddy boat system ,where each take turn sleeping,while other watches for ships.

Took advantage of this rounding the bottom of South Africa between Durban and Port Elizabeth - but the other boats were crewed. Not only to watch for ships, but for the other sail boats to watch out for me too.:viking:

jackdale 19-08-2013 12:24

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Wrong (Post 1316921)
Whether single handing or with crew if your vessel is hove-to or disabled in an area with heavy traffic, it is good practice to announce to all stations your position, speed and direction of travel. No matter the reason.:whistling:

A better approach when disabled is to contact vessel traffic services and let them know of your predicament. They will then inform all participating traffic.

Been there, done that. In 2000 we were adrift at the entrance to Juan de Fuca Straits for 1.5 days. (No transmission.) We actually were NUC but did not have the lights or dayshapes to display. Tofino Traffic and Seattle Traffic let shipping know our position; they have much more powerful transmitters.

Wrong 19-08-2013 12:25

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by jackdale (Post 1316948)
A better approach when disabled is to contact vessel traffic services and let them know of your predicament. They will then inform all participating traffic.

Been there, done that. In 2000 we were adrift at the entrance to Juan de Fuca Straits for 1.5 days. (No transmission.) We actually were NUC but did not have the lights or dayshapes to display. Tofino Traffic and Seattle Traffic let shipping know our position; they have much more powerful transmitters.

Thanks. Refreshing to get useful, positive responses to posts!:popcorn:

Rakuflames 19-08-2013 12:38

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by zeehag (Post 1316868)
hammocks on smaller boats hang well between main mast and headstay.

my boat requires an inner forestay or a temp babystay for installation of same hammock.

i am happier in my cool comfortable aft cockpit with a cooling tropical breeze blowing across my sofa....unfortunately those breezes are too soft for sailing here..


Yeah I could hang one there, but I couldn't be at the helm there. :)

I've told my daughters I want a hanging chair for Christmas or birthday (they're close together).

JPA Cate 19-08-2013 12:49

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
This occurred before SatNav, so back when we were using celestial navigation, and we did have VHF. The vessel was an S&S 30 footer, called a Yankee 30, in the States.

It was nighttime and raining heavily, sometime after midnight. The wind had finally stopped increasing after building for quite a while, and settled down at 35-40 knots. We were well out at sea, somewhere north of Kauai, en route from Kauai to San Francisco. The waves had built with the breeze, and visibility was impaired.

I put out a blind call on the VHF, had been unable to see far enough in the dark, rain, and seas. Following my broadcasts, I saw the lights of a freighter astern, and it appeared to me that they were turning to avoid us.

Admittedly, it happened a long time ago, but sometimes shipping personnel are listening, and do behave responsibly. Good on 'em. I sure felt grateful.

Ann

Rakuflames 19-08-2013 12:50

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by goboatingnow (Post 1316883)
Jeepers Raku, A lot of sh1t happens to you, I must stay well away:p

dave


I keep telling you -- I take my boat out a lot. I've probably done more sailing in the six years I've been sailing than many have in 16 - 20 years. You go out, stuff is gonna happen.

I didn't see the problems with this guy coming. I had sailed with him, including racing -- but on his boat. So of course, he was the skipper. What I *didn't* know about him was that he really, seriously thought men were superior in all things to women. So when he got on my boat as crew, he really thought he should be the skipper -- just because he was male!

We made a wrong turn in one place. The chartplotter showed me immediately; I could see the shallows. I turned the boat around. He argued about that because he had not confirmed on the paper chart.

Then he insisted that I should turn starboard 90 to get out, and I said no, we're going out the way we came in, we know that's a good way out and it won't take long. Five minutes later he pulled his nose out of his (well you fill in the gap, but apparently that's where he had the chart -- grin) and said -- I have studied the chart and we should go out the way we came in.

I showed him how the chartplotter showed the *exact* track we had followed in, but he refused to learn anything about the thing at all. That was my chart he was so engrossed in. I don't ignore charts, but sometimes if you have to make a decision on where to go in five second, a chartplotter can be a handy little gadget.

It went on and on that way. He didn't like it when I took the boat through Longboat Pass, but it's a difficult entrance and it was my insurance and my boat on the line. And, he had already shown me he couldn't make quick, good decisions, because using a paper chart in a tight spot isn't always efficient. But at the same time, he refused to help keep the log up to date with lat, long and time, and he refused to plot it on the chart.

I'm all for knowing how to DR, but on the other hand, if you know *exactly* where you are, to me it makes sense to put it on the chart. I use a grease pencil and it can easily be wiped away for the next trip.

One thing I absolutely knew about this man: I did not want him standing watch at night while we crossed over to the Tortugas to meet up with some other boats. My boat was about as different from his 25' Cape Dory as a 31' boat can be, and he'd sailed on it very little.

Oh, I could go on. It was a long 24 hours.

Wrong 19-08-2013 12:55

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ann T. Cate (Post 1316978)
This occurred before SatNav, so back when we were using celestial navigation, and we did have VHF. The vessel was an S&S 30 footer, called a Yankee 30, in the States.

It was nighttime and raining heavily, sometime after midnight. The wind had finally stopped increasing after building for quite a while, and settled down at 35-40 knots. We were well out at sea, somewhere north of Kauai, en route from Kauai to San Francisco. The waves had built with the breeze, and visibility was impaired.

I put out a blind call on the VHF, had been unable to see far enough in the dark, rain, and seas. Following my broadcasts, I saw the lights of a freighter astern, and it appeared to me that they were turning to avoid us.

Admittedly, it happened a long time ago, but sometimes shipping personnel are listening, and do behave responsibly. Good on 'em. I sure felt grateful.

Ann

I'd just passed between the West and East Gardens on the way to Galveston when a norther arrived. Hove-to. Also 35-40 knots and the waves sent my boat airborne at least 4 times. Due to the ship traffic in the area I announced an 'all stations' call informing ships in the area of my presence. Position, direction of travel and speed - including an estimate of time when I'd be crossing a shipping lane. One ship responded saying he was north of my position, and due to the conditions estimated there wasn't much traffic to worry about. Never hurts to announce.
:popcorn:

Rakuflames 19-08-2013 13:11

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ann T. Cate (Post 1316978)
This occurred before SatNav, so back when we were using celestial navigation, and we did have VHF. The vessel was an S&S 30 footer, called a Yankee 30, in the States.

It was nighttime and raining heavily, sometime after midnight. The wind had finally stopped increasing after building for quite a while, and settled down at 35-40 knots. We were well out at sea, somewhere north of Kauai, en route from Kauai to San Francisco. The waves had built with the breeze, and visibility was impaired.

I put out a blind call on the VHF, had been unable to see far enough in the dark, rain, and seas. Following my broadcasts, I saw the lights of a freighter astern, and it appeared to me that they were turning to avoid us.

Admittedly, it happened a long time ago, but sometimes shipping personnel are listening, and do behave responsibly. Good on 'em. I sure felt grateful.

Ann


That is a hair-raising story!

Snore 19-08-2013 13:47

Quote:

Originally Posted by defjef (Post 1316447)

I don't cook meals on such passages... food is a quickie snack stiff... pretzels, candy, fruit... or maybe a can of soup. Quick gallery stop and then return to the cockpit.
).

While you have me on open sea miles, I've done a fair amount of endurance racing. Informal surveys of guys who have raced 24-48 hours non-stop is that junk food results in secondary problems. These include loss of mental acuity and hallucinations. YMMV, or you could just be young enough that your body can run on that fuel.

Something to ponder.

Me? I have two Natural High dried meals for quick food. Heat water, add to package, wrap towel around bag, and eat anywhere- anytime. That and kippers or sardines


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