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-   -   Keeping Watch at Night ? (https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f2/keeping-watch-at-night-109186.html)

Wrong 17-08-2013 06:26

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by sabray (Post 1314354)
Trashing laptop one night in the box. Be safe amd enjoy.
Cool hand

One night in the box?! That's walk the plank stuff!:devil:

Kenomac 17-08-2013 06:51

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Wrong (Post 1313018)
You exaggerate. The dangers sailing single handed don't even approximate the danger posed in your example.:whistling:

I'm still waiting on Joshua Slocum's sequel book on his voyage down to the Caribbean.... I wonder how it will end?

barnakiel 17-08-2013 07:40

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kenomac (Post 1314601)
I'm still waiting on Joshua Slocum's sequel book on his voyage down to the Caribbean.... I wonder how it will end?

Some say he sailed to an adjacent bay where he beached and burned Spray. He settled down in a hut overlooking the bay. There is a book (possibly available s/h from Amazon) where one can read about it.

b.

goboatingnow 17-08-2013 07:50

Quote:

Originally Posted by jackdale (Post 1314186)

A friend sailed with John and Amanda Neal. Apparently they put a paying crew member ashore for not informing John of a vessel on the horizon.

That's a bit steep, but if it was communicated to the crew in standing orders ,I view that as a serious breach.

In my case I modify the standing orders depending on who I sail with. Newbies get explicit orders to wake me for course changes , sail changes and vessels approaching ( vessels on the horizons , would have me up all night in certain places )

Dave

colemj 17-08-2013 08:01

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Sailmonkey (Post 1313895)
I'll tell you it ain't blue. Our autopilot came with a blue halo around the course knob. I have never experienced eye pain like that thing created in the middle of the night!!

It is not the color, it is the intensity that matters. The whole red light thing was disproved a while ago. The only reason red "seems" to work is because it is almost always a very low intensity. The human eye is most sensitive to the green/yellow part of the spectrum, so a low intensity green light would probably be best. White light is always best if one needs to see colors on things (try reading red markings or letters on a chart under red light).

Mark

noelex 77 17-08-2013 08:15

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by colemj (Post 1314671)
The only reason red "seems" to work is because it is almost always a very low intensity. White light is always best if one needs to see colors on things (try reading red markings or letters on a chart under red light).

Mark

No it works because the rods used for scotopic vision are insensitive to red. You can therefore see detail with your retinal cones in red light illumination leaving your rods unaffected and still ready to use.

If you use anything other than red you bleach out your rods if it is bright enough to read even large letters or figures.

Quote:

Originally Posted by colemj (Post 1314671)
White light is always best if one needs to see colors on things (try reading red markings or letters on a chart under red light).

Mark

+1. Sometimes its worth sacrificing some your dark adaptation to see colour, or see detail easily ( dull red is difficult and unpleasant to use), but it is a shame if you are only making a coffee or quickly checking a compass bearing.

barnakiel 17-08-2013 08:22

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
I simply turn off/cover all lights. Can't see why others can't (?)

The only light that is most of the time on will be our compass lamp - very dim, very red and this one too switched of if the night is starry.

b.

noelex 77 17-08-2013 08:33

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by barnakiel (Post 1314689)
I simply turn off/cover all lights. Can't see why others can't (?)

The only light that is most of the time on will be our compass lamp - very dim, very red and this one too switched of if the night is starry.

b.

+1
Everyone should try this. You will be amazed how much more detail you can see after 1/2 hour.
There are other times when the radar, AIS and chartplotter are invaluable and its worth reducing your dark adaptation to use these devices.

At least have the ability to change to maximium night vision mode when its warranted.
Its great if you can set up your boat so you can still get basic information like depth, heading, STW, SOG waypoint information etc with no, or minimal effect on night vision.
Few boats achieve these basic goals.

goboatingnow 17-08-2013 08:56

Quote:

Originally Posted by noelex 77 (Post 1314706)

At least have the ability to change to maximium night vision mode when its warranted.
Its great if you can set up your boat so you can still get basic information like depth, heading, STW, SOG waypoint information etc with no, or minimal effect on night vision.
Few boats achieve these basic goals.

Which is why I like analog needle type gauges and hate the modern graphic equivalent

Dave

jackdale 17-08-2013 09:09

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by goboatingnow (Post 1314659)
That's a bit steep, but if it was communicated to the crew in standing orders ,I view that as a serious breach.

In my case I modify the standing orders depending on who I sail with. Newbies get explicit orders to wake me for course changes , sail changes and vessels approaching ( vessels on the horizons , would have me up all night in certain places )

Dave

Out curiosity, how many have standing orders? I have one set for my around Vancouver Island and another set for ocean. I have everyone read and initial and they are in the front of the deck log. They have been modified over time based on "experience." For example, a course change must be preceded by a 360 degree horizon sweep and a radar check. One crew gybed when a freighter was close to overtaking them.

I have them because I am usually sailing with folks I do not know and I am usually doing instruction as well.

I tell my crews that I will sleep better knowing that they will wake if needed.

goboatingnow 17-08-2013 09:13

Quote:

Originally Posted by jackdale (Post 1314749)

Out curiosity, how many have standing orders? I have one set for my around Vancouver Island and another set for ocean. I have everyone read and initial and they are in the front of the deck log. They have been modified over time based on "experience." For example, a course change must be preceded by a 360 degree horizon sweep and a radar check. One crew gybed when a freighter was close to overtaking them.

I have them because I am usually sailing with folks I do not know and I am usually doing instruction as well.

I tell my crews that I will sleep better knowing that they will wake if needed.

I have standing orders on a page that post at the nav table . I have night orders that I write at the top of the log page.

But primarily I emphasise calling me if in doubt and the presence of traffic. Very few things can kill the boat instantly like a 50,000 tanker !

Dave

Wrong 17-08-2013 09:19

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by barnakiel (Post 1314689)
I simply turn off/cover all lights. Can't see why others can't (?)

The only light that is most of the time on will be our compass lamp - very dim, very red and this one too switched of if the night is starry.

b.

All lights? Including your masthead running light?

Seriously, even the masthead light casts enough light to potential affect night vision. Especially the stern white light.:whistling:

zeehag 17-08-2013 09:36

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
masthead running light??? aint got one. mine are 10 ft off water and outward. safe and visible by all. they also add a little light to the sails so is more visible.
accommodation for night vision varies from individual to individual
there is a lot to do in darkness---even without capability of reading books or listening to music--the music of the ocean and the stars and life in seas--they keep you occupied, along with sail trim, navigation, and sifting ambient weird lights from distances unknown....
and, when nothing is around ---horizon checks for wayward fishing boats and ships of any sort.
and drift nets.

colemj 17-08-2013 10:01

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by noelex 77 (Post 1314682)
No it works because the rods used for scotopic vision are insensitive to red. You can therefore see detail with your retinal cones in red light illumination leaving your rods unaffected and still ready to use.

If you use anything other than red you bleach out your rods if it is bright enough to read even large letters or figures.


+1. Sometimes its worth sacrificing some your dark adaptation to see colour, or see detail easily ( dull red is difficult and unpleasant to use), but it is a shame if you are only making a coffee or quickly checking a compass bearing.

Night Vision - The Red Myth

https://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc...c=GetTRDoc.pdf (summary on first page)

What is the purpose of blue lights used in a submarine

Mark

colemj 17-08-2013 10:03

Re: Keeping Watch at Night ?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by jackdale (Post 1314749)
Out curiosity, how many have standing orders?

If I gave standing orders to my crew, I would no longer be standing. I do, however, obey any orders she gives me... :thumb:

Mark


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