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-   -   Only One Anchor (https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f118/only-one-anchor-10513.html)

Keegan 14-10-2007 09:03

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lynx (Post 105434)
I would have several different types for world cruising but for my cruising grounds, Bahamas and East USA I bought a Super Max. Not on your list as well.

Vote "other"

alaskadog 14-10-2007 09:57

Bruce
 
I use a 33 lb. genuine Bruce on my 13,000 lb. displacement (before add ons and on cruising mode) mono hull sloop as my primary anchor. I also have about 120 feet of chain which seems to be more than adequate for the shallow areas where I usually anchor (backed up with 150 feet of 3-strand nylon rode). I have been very well pleased with its quick resetting characteristics when I have changes in wind and/or tidal currents. It resets so quickly in sand and most mud bottoms that for all purposes it does not drag even with very high winds and 180 degree shifts in fairly strong tidal currents. It does poorly in grass however and has dragged several times when in grass. Have to search hard and try to find non grassy spots among the grass. Sometimes my FX-23 Fortress seems to work fairly well in grass but it doesn't reset well. The Bruce does not do so well on hard bottoms either. I don't know what works well on thin,fine sand over coral. Lots and lots of chain for that is what I have to do.

SkiprJohn 14-10-2007 11:35

Ok, Ok,
Lots of folks have responded saying they use different anchors. I thought the question was "if you could choose only one type of anchor." I suppose that you could have several different weights/sizes of the same type anchor and that would meet the parameters of your question. For example, lightweight for lunch hook, medium weight for overnighting good weather and heavy weight for days of stormy conditions? Again, I think it would just not happen in my case. If I had three anchors I'd have three different styles. In heavy weather I'd deploy the two largest. Some of the new styles sound promising and maybe better than my big ole CQR but since I haven't tried them I can't fill in the vote. I'll do a hanging chad. Partially punched in favor of the ??
Kind Regards,
JohnL

Weyalan 14-10-2007 15:26

I voted CQR, but really my vote is not particularly valid because I am only experienced with CQR and Danforth... but there you have it.

Ex-Calif 14-10-2007 18:02

Quote:

Originally Posted by SkiprJohn (Post 105491)
Ok, Ok,
Lots of folks have responded saying they use different anchors. I thought the question was "if you could choose only one type of anchor."

The longest threads here are usually about anchors, chain length and dinks.

So let's set a record - What kind of anchor do you use on your dink and how long is the chain?

I use an 80 pound CQR with 600 feet of 5/8 inch chain. I always throw out all the chain when I hit the beach cuz you never know...

senormechanico 14-10-2007 20:22

Bruce, far and away better than CQR. The only time it dragged was when we hugged a rock, but we knew it when we set it and thought, "aw, what the hell it's nice weather."
Yeah right!

Steve B.

senormechanico 14-10-2007 20:26

Quote:

Originally Posted by alaskadog (Post 105475)
[snipped]

The Bruce does not do so well on hard bottoms either. I don't know what works well on thin,fine sand over coral. Lots and lots of chain for that is what I have to do.

AFAIK, the only thing which works in that condition is fast setting concrete!


Steve B.

GMac 15-10-2007 01:04

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kiwikat (Post 105421)
The boat is a Farr 1104 (36 footer). Displacement? Wouldn't have a clue. It is not a standard 1104 and as we have fully kitted it out for cruising it is no longer the lightweight racer it once was. i.e. hardtop dodger, roller main and every creature comfort we can squeeze on. We went for a no.5 though we could probably have gotten away with a no.4 mind you we have a lot of mates in bigger boats that happily hang off the back of us at drink o'clock in 25 odd knots. Sorry, not quite sure where you are coming from with the rock-slot question.

I know the 1104's, even sailed one in the NZ nationals and sailed into one the following year in a Farr 9.2 :)

Just asking about the slot to see whether it had anything to do with your purchasing decision.

Just an interesting choice of anchor. You're currently in Aussie I'm guessing.

slow shoes 15-10-2007 04:30

For the folks who are carrying multiple anchors - could you give some suggestions on how to safely stow the spare anchors. I'm assuming they are lashed down securely below to keep them from getting loose in the event of a rollover, but I've never been able to fiqure out how to do this aboard my own boat. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

rebel heart 15-10-2007 07:17

I keep my primary up on the bow roller, and if I'm not planning on using it for a while, I go up and lash it down in position on the bowsprit. On an old boat I had the anchor fly off the roller once and smash the bow up a bit; it happened when the weather was at its worse, of course. My other anchors sit in lockers in the cabin, although now that I think about it, in a rollover they would fly free and trash my world. Hmm.

I've had good luck with a Bruce, have a CQR now, but will probably give the Rocna a try too. I have a danforth for grassy stuff; it seems to work well with that. I suppose I'll be happy with (for a 28K pound full keel boat):

- 75lb+ Rocna / Bruce for my main.
- 75lb+ CQR as a seconary.
- 50lb + Danforth for grassy stuff.
- 5lb (or whatever it is) dinghy anchor.

300' of chain, manual windlass.

----

I'm sure you've read this everywhere else, but get a biggest anchor you can and a ton (literally) of chain to back it up. Cheap insurance.

schoonerdog 15-10-2007 08:23

It's interesting to read, I travelled with a Danforth (great for chespeake mud when the CQR would hold), CQR (which would skip in really high wind in mud, NOT good), an aluminum spade which held really well in sand in the bahamas (used every day for a year in different sandy bottoms and never ever dragged in sand), but the spade did have problems in turtle grass and some weird witches brew mud at one anchorage in Florida where absolutely nothing could grab hold, even the danforth. I think I would try a Rocna for our primary next trip, seems very versatile and also carry an aluminum fortress and spade. I would use these only in situations where I needed to limit my swinging room because of a tight anchorage. Most of the time, even in storm forecasts I would rather swing to one really good overweight anchor than a couple ones which are "proper" for the boat. You only ride to one anchor at a time and when that one fails, dragging back in the wrong direction against your secondary anchor (because you are now dragging over it in the opposite direction which you set it) is asking for trouble because now you are hoping that your secondary anchor can 1) hold more than your now rapidly skipping along primary 2) set unattended because you really didn't plan to drag and are probably asleep, 3) set at a very fast speed of a boat dragging in high wind, 4) that there's nothing like a plastic bag sitting behind your secondary anchor ready to foul it when it tries to reset in a different direction at 3am when you can't see a thing in 60 knots of wind. Oh those aren't hypotheticals....

SkiprJohn 15-10-2007 10:36

Aloha Scooner,

This is a good point: Thanks.

"Most of the time, even in storm forecasts I would rather swing to one really good overweight anchor than a couple ones which are "proper" for the boat. You only ride to one anchor at a time and when that one fails, dragging back in the wrong direction against your secondary anchor (because you are now dragging over it in the opposite direction which you set it)"

JohnL

Keegan 15-10-2007 14:39

Wow,

It is interesting to see the CQR starting to gain in the poll. It could very well take the lead...Who would have thought, with all of the constant babble on the "New Generation Anchors"

One thing for sure, a few years ago people raved about the CQR as a great anchor. Maybe it is just being out marketed now by some "New" designs.

keegan

Keegan 15-10-2007 16:28

SSCA Discussion Board :: View topic - Spade Anchor Failure Story in 8-07 Bulletin


INteresting discussion on Spade Anchor Failure

Kiwikat 15-10-2007 23:45

Quote:

Originally Posted by GMac (Post 105604)
I know the 1104's, even sailed one in the NZ nationals and sailed into one the following year in a Farr 9.2 :)

Just asking about the slot to see whether it had anything to do with your purchasing decision.

Just an interesting choice of anchor. You're currently in Aussie I'm guessing.


The slot didn't have alot to do with the decision. Just another feature really that could come in handy. It also good forward to run forward on to break it out of heavy mud. Our main reason for purchase was it's versatility sand, shingle, mud, rock and grass. No other anchor we have had has really excelled in any of 1 these, let alone all of them. We had recommendations from a mate who does fishing charters in the hauraki gulf and goes out in all weather conditions and he swears by them. Another mate who was mark boat when the America's was on in Auckland said he sometimes had trouble staying on station until he put the SARCA on. We wandered around our local marinas and saw that heaps of boats were using them. Yes, they are a bit fugly but it is a boat not a grand piano.

Yes, we are in OZ at the mo but the boat lives in NZ. We are back there in November for a couple of weeks and again at Xmas for 5 weeks cruising.:smiling:


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