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Old 17-04-2020, 18:33   #76
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Re: World Provisioning for Beginners: What's not so common?

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I would certainly agree with zip lock bags. Load up on them before you leave the states. The two items I was surprised at were canned chicken and Grape Jelly. No where to be found. Corned beef, canned tuna, and salmon are everywhere, even in the tinny places. But not once across the South pacific could I fine these two items.
Why on earth would anyone want canned chicken and tuna if good free range chicken is available in most of the world, and fresh tuna is available in the ocean? We got so stuffed with tuna on the passage to Marquesas I could not look at it for six months afterwards...

One thing I typically miss in many places is quality 90-95% dark chocolate. Another is leafy greens, which are often scarce in the tropics, and pretty much impossible to stock up on.

In the end, it all boils down to personal preference and acquired taste, but I think it is important to be able to find quality basic ingredients. You can make any coffee from good coffee beans, but you cannot make a good espresso from a can of Folgers...
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Old 17-04-2020, 19:19   #77
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Re: World Provisioning for Beginners: What's not so common?

I read your later post about yielding 2lb/day, and I came up with the same results. I wonder about two factors.

First, these are all dry weights. Water adds no nourishment, but is included with our normal diet. My usual breakfast is a quarter cup of oatmeal -- but once cooked, is three times it's original weight. 2 pounds of dried supplies could easily be over 4 pounds as served, making an ample diet.

Second, it assumes no animal supplement. Good for survival planning, maybe not for planning for cruising. I hope to have a few fish and chicken off and on.

It does provide for a starting point. But I can't see my bride and I eating 4 pounds of dried spaghetti noodles a day between us -- that would be a very large pile when cooked!

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For basic gross proportions here is an excellent calculator.

Food Storage Calculator – Family Preparedness
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Old 17-04-2020, 21:33   #78
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Re: World Provisioning for Beginners: What's not so common?

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...Indonesia and Philippines...…..somewhat depends on access to a major city ………...a 'supermarket' as known to Europeans can be difficult to find.....but a lot of shops sell a strange... to us.....mix of products …..bread is difficult....what is sometimes called bread tastes like cake....if found......cheese....milk......fruit......vegetabl es that are familiar.....mostly the oranges are green skin...but ripe.....meat in Indonesia...….coffee that is drinkable......chicken is fairly common.....can be distressingly fresh....but not so much in Indonesia......there are mountains of dried fish usually smoked ...….and dried sardines...eaten whole...…..and extremely salted...….piles of chillies......and even more chillies...shopping is an adventure not being able to read the labels...…..a supermarket in Davao had a 'helper girl' that always spoke English every 3 m (10 feet) on every aisle.....and loved to help.

As a slight thread drift....In Chengdu (China) pop. 25m......there were 63 Europeans....and 1 'Western' eatery.....street food an adventure....just don't ask what it is...….
To be fair there are little bakeries every five feet (joke, but sometimes literally) in the Philippines. And I LOVE the philippine breads.

Hard to find tomato ketchup there. They use banana ketchup.

Hard to find good beef.

The tomatoes taste different and so does the cheese they use so anything italian will taste different.

Their hotdogs are quite different.

BUT... the local fruit is WONDERFUL!!!! And food is very inexpensive if you avoid wester style groceries and shop in the local markets. Avocados and Mangos are 1-2dollars for a Walmart/grocery bag full!

I eat the same amount and my weight drops 20-40 lbs every time I go stay for a while because the food is so much more healthy. I love coming back and getting a real steak or hamburger from time to time, but living in the Philippines is much more healthy food wise.
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Old 18-04-2020, 04:25   #79
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Re: World Provisioning for Beginners: What's not so common?

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168 gallons of water, 8 pounds of sugar, and 4 pounds of yeast and 45 years of cruising
Zzmeyer,

Your post says nothing to inform us, even if you think this is too much or too little.

How about giving us something more substantial to chew on.
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Old 18-04-2020, 04:43   #80
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Re: World Provisioning for Beginners: What's not so common?

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I read your later post about yielding 2lb/day, and I came up with the same results. I wonder about two factors.

First, these are all dry weights. Water adds no nourishment, but is included with our normal diet. My usual breakfast is a quarter cup of oatmeal -- but once cooked, is three times it's original weight. 2 pounds of dried supplies could easily be over 4 pounds as served, making an ample diet.

Second, it assumes no animal supplement. Good for survival planning, maybe not for planning for cruising. I hope to have a few fish and chicken off and on.

It does provide for a starting point. But I can't see my bride and I eating 4 pounds of dried spaghetti noodles a day between us -- that would be a very large pile when cooked!
I agree it’s a starting point. And it’s a survival diet for hard times, to keep you alive.

I like to think of this as the base line food supply, it is what you need. It also gives you a sense of proportion, including water for consumption. So if you have this you won’t starve. Then supplement this with the various things you want and like to make this diet more palatable. Meats, sauces, dried nuts and fruits, etc.

But if you and your mate are planning a trip from the Caribbean to the Azores and have 20 one pound cans of stew, it ain’t gonna be enough. And you can probably safely skip the 40 pound bag of basmati rice.
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Old 18-04-2020, 12:00   #81
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Re: World Provisioning for Beginners: What's not so common?

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T

Hard to find tomato ketchup there. They use banana ketchup.

...

Their hotdogs are quite different.
What in god's name is banana ketchup??? And I can imagine their hotdogs are different Its probably one of the most widely interpreted foods with the only common ingredient being "stuff."
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Old 18-04-2020, 13:07   #82
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Re: World Provisioning for Beginners: What's not so common?

[QUOTE=sailingharry;3119223] The one thing I couldn't wait to get home for was a good cup of Joe. They have NO CLUE about how to make coffee in Italy! Awful stuff! And I'm saying that tongue in cheek, as I'm sure they say the same thing about that watered down swill that I drink.


Good coffee is an issue in places. When you get Americano coffee in the Med it is usually Nescafe and not exactly that great. On the boat we have a coffee grinder and each and every time we go shopping we look for coffee beans and when we find them we stock up -
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Old 18-04-2020, 16:48   #83
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Re: World Provisioning for Beginners: What's not so common?

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What in god's name is banana ketchup???

I first came across it in Singapore - in mee goreng mamak (Singapore Tamil version of stir fired noodles)
Similar taste to tomato ketchup, I believe it originated in the Phillipines in WW2



Quote:
And I can imagine their hotdogs are different Its probably one of the most widely interpreted foods with the only common ingredient being "stuff."
I always liked Anthony Bourdain's expression: "mystery meat in tube form"


Or as he wrote in "Medium Raw"

"With the hot dog there was always a feeling of implied consent. We always knew—or assumed we knew—that whatever was inside that snappy tube, it might contain anything from 100 percent kosher beef to dead zoo animals or parts of missing Gambino family. With a hot dog, especially New York's famous "dirty-water hot dog", there was a tacit agreement that you were on your own."
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Old 18-04-2020, 21:10   #84
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Re: World Provisioning for Beginners: What's not so common?

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What in god's name is banana ketchup??? And I can imagine their hotdogs are different Its probably one of the most widely interpreted foods with the only common ingredient being "stuff."
It's ketchup... made from bananas... and tastes like neither.

If you're in the states head to your local asian store and you can probably find some.

I don't recommend it. lol.
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Old 18-04-2020, 23:06   #85
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Re: World Provisioning for Beginners: What's not so common?

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Aussies (I presume) know that Vegemite isn't going to be available in most places they travel to. I was just wondering what my equivalent was.
Anywhere there's an Aussie, there you will find Vegemite.....

Me? I like Promite, as well. It's a different consistency and slightly more vinegary flavour is nice for a change.

But you Poms can keep your Marmite.... lol
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Old 18-04-2020, 23:36   #86
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Re: World Provisioning for Beginners: What's not so common?

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Aussies (I presume) know that Vegemite isn't going to be available in most places they travel to.
Yes, the UN has banned it as carcinogenic, toxic, unhealthy and nasty, so it is available in only a few benighted places. As a card carrying Yank, I'm supposed to substitute peanut butter, but as I'm allergic to peanuts, I make do with soft, stinky cheeses.

O the travails of the cruising life...

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Old 28-04-2020, 12:06   #87
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Re: World Provisioning for Beginners: What's not so common?

I can't claim to have any experience of provisioning in exotic places, I do have a few observations of doing so in the Med. First of all compared to the UK supermarkets in Greece and Italy, even large chains in big towns don't seem to carry the variety they do at home. In Italy there are whole aisles of Pasta and tomato products but not much of anything else. We could only get Minestrone soup and then only in the winter months. In Greece the ham was disgusting, only getting marginally better in Corfu, which is more Italian in outlook. It was impossible to find things Brits hanker after, like Bisto (Gravy), custard and Mango Chutney. In our first season, we didn't have enough solar to run the fridge all the time so in the absence of yoghurts, custard makes a good base for deserts. I have not visited but I understand that Malta is good for British food.

Whilst many out there will be feeling that we should be more flexible in our eating habits, when you are away for nearly a year you do long for the taste of home. Personally as a man who is responsible not only for the sailing and boat maintenance but also the provisioning and cooking it is often helpfull to be able to cook the old favourites that one can do in ones sleep. We are not averse to trying new culinary experiences but it can sometimes be a lot of effort finding out how to cook unfamiliar ingredients. Before we first went to Greece I realised that I might not be able to get some of my favourite ingredients so I decided the solution would be to cook what the locals cook, with local ingredients. With this in mind I bought a book on the cooking of the Greek Islands. When I tried to put the plan in to action in the Greek islands, none of the ingredients were actually available. The book was a sham and contained phreases like "this recipe was created by (name redacted) for his famous Manhattan restaurant. You will also find that it is best to eat the traditional dishes in the local restaurants, since that is all they will have on their menu and you will get rather fed up with them after six months.
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Old 28-04-2020, 12:29   #88
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Re: World Provisioning for Beginners: What's not so common?

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My trip to the Bahamas got cancelled so I didn't get to test it but we were going to be 6 people for 6 weeks. Your calculator said I needed 300 pounds of grain, 42 pounds of sugar, 4 pounds of yeast and 168 gallons of water. Pure nonsense.
You're going to need a lot more water.
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