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Old 20-06-2018, 18:48   #1426
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

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This thread is mercilessly cruel to someone browsing here with an empty stomach!
Totally agree!
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Old 20-06-2018, 18:52   #1427
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

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With guests coming Friday night I thought some hummus to have with pre dinner drinks would be good.

OK, OK, I freely admit it. The real reason is that I was keen to test out this garlic technique, and I have zero patience .

I have some chickpeas soaking and I have just made up the lemon tahini sauce that will be added, as per this recipe:
Tahini Sauce With Garlic and Lemon Recipe | Serious Eats
The only variation is that I included the rind of the 3 lemons as well.

I skeptically started puréeing just one whole unpeeled clove using my stick mixer and tasted. Zero sharpness. Then two, then three, then the whole small head.
WOW! This works. Loads of flavour as you do with roasted garlic, no horrible taste.

Almost a cupful of cold water went into the sauce to give the right consistency.

I will cook up the chickpeas tomorrow and try the recipe in the previous post. One small tip I can add is that most of the skins are easy to remove if the chickpeas are rubbed after soaking while still submerged in water. The skins float to the top and are easy to skim off. I think this improves the texture of the hummus.

Unbelievable that a whole head of raw garlic went successfully into this!

SWL

TAHINI SAUCE
Didn't that much garlic become overwhelming after the sauce had time to sit and the flavors had time to blend together?
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Old 21-06-2018, 01:14   #1428
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

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Didn't that much garlic become overwhelming after the sauce had time to sit and the flavors had time to blend together?
The flavour did not intensify with sitting. Unlike chopped garlic, the effect of minced/puerreed garlic is fairly instant.

I was gobsmacked that the garlic flavour was smooth with such a massive quantity. The key is to leave the cloves unpeeled and not cut into them even slightly until they are immersed completely in lemon juice. It would depend on the age and size of your bulb (freshly picked young garlic is really pungent) so I would taste along the way.

It is a fun experiment, as adding a dozen or so cloves is such an instinctively wrong thing to do. I would normally only put about half a clove of garlic in this quantity of hummus. The flavour was superb though. Significantly less sharp than with even half a clove added.

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Old 21-06-2018, 17:51   #1429
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

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There's a couple. I posted a lot on "solar cooking?"

Found it here, thanks:



http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/...en-175407.html
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Old 09-09-2018, 08:42   #1430
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

Another Waterworld recipe brought to you by sparrowhawk. Start out with The Tender Greens and buds from garden grown sweet potatoes, basil, green onion, home fermented cauliflower, garlic, sauerkraut. Add a can of minced clams, some sliced black olives, and pasta. Mix with mayo, olive oil , parmesan cheese and nutritional yeast. The fermented vegetables added all the salt necessary and a great crunch.Click image for larger version

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Old 19-09-2018, 05:36   #1431
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

When I first moved aboard I didn't have refrigeration and now I have a small one, not large enough to store vegetables in. I highly recommend fermentation not just for the health benefits of the good bacteria but mostly for storage. I'm going to post more details on one of the threads on it .for this thread not only is it more convenient to spend sometime at first prepping the food and then being able to get it as you need it without making a mess, I started saving scraps that I have room in my fridge to store enough to make vegetable broth for a month. I'm also saving all my bones to add making vegetable bone broth. My favorite things to cook in it are grains, beans and split peas. it tastes so so good and is highly nutritious! it never crossed my mind to save onion and garlic skin until I saw YouTube video on it. I do a small pot in my solar oven, strain it, store in my fridge overnight, fill with water again and get a pint each day because my pot is so small. Next time I'm going to chop the vegetables up . I know the vegetable scraps don't look appetizing but after you've had something cooked in the broth it will look beautiful.Click image for larger version

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PS. Whenever I have shrimp I save the shells and make a seafood vegetable broth.
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Old 19-09-2018, 12:06   #1432
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

Just had a awesome lunch. split pea soup cooked in veggie, bone broth added about a heeping teaspoon of miso paste, a teaspoon of Butter Buds, couple tablespoons olive oil, and two slices of havarti cheese. Also I had some Sailors pie : a layer of scalloped potatoes on the bottom,a layer of hamburger, after it cooked all morning in the solar oven I added fermented broccoli, carrots and garlic and let them heat up. Since the vegetables were prepped earlier the whole meal only took about 5 minutes prep time, 10 at the most. If you look closely at the photo you can see about an inch of liquid that's all juice from the hamburger that the potatoes cooked in.Click image for larger version

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Old 19-09-2018, 15:28   #1433
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

Just a word of caution with fermenting. When you first start out only have about a tablespoonful until your body gets rid of the bad bacteria that the fermented foods good bacteria is going to kill. slowly increase your amount of fermented foods and before you know it you can eat as much as you want and your body will actually crave them. And just a word of note according to I believe it's the FDA but I've been watching many lectures and they all note that there has been no recorded food poisoning connected to fermented foods, ever. That's because unlike canned foods where it's possible to have no odor, if fermented food is bad you'll know it. If mold grows and is anything but Snow White toss it out.PS that white mold is good for you, similar to the mold on Brie.
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Old 20-01-2019, 09:20   #1434
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Re: Fermentation and Bottling for Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

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Originally Posted by sparrowhawk1 View Post
When I first moved aboard I didn't have refrigeration and now I have a small one, not large enough to store vegetables in. I highly recommend fermentation not just for the health benefits of the good bacteria but mostly for storage. I'm going to post more details on one of the threads on it .
Hello, sparrowhawk, hello everybody who is interested in healthy cooking on board.

I am very interested in this topic "fermentation". i live for now on board of a small 30 footer (monohull). No Fridge or cooler on board. For now no problem during winter times, as in the storage boards close to the hull its around 6 degrees, as I live in North Europe. As the boat is rented, its not yet a big issue as interims solution... I plan to buy an own boat, preferible a fast multihull (leight weight discplacement trimaran).

Maybe living without a fridge is worth to think about, under different aspects (e.g. less electric power consumption). Since September I live on this boat, and it works, as I can visit daily the supermarket. But how to deal in hot summer times and during sailing far away from catering and grocery shops ?

Switching from a land based life, where its easy to hopp every day into the supermarket to buy fresh food, to a living on board and living during sailing life style requires some good logistic and storage plannings, which I like to learn from the experienced ones. A friend of mine (and colleague as professional sailor) is living on a tiny 24 footer, and his solution without having a freezer/cooler is "fermentation". He is vegetarian ... and looks very healthy, no body overweight and fresh in mind.

Actually I have no clue abouthow to deal with this topic and where to start.

I grew up in the 60s/70s with healthy food, parents and grand parents conservated for winter time during the harvesting summer/autumn lots of fruits, self made jam and vegetables from own garden by bottling and preserving meat from aunt's farm.

As ENG is not my native language, I think the correct term is "home canning", right ?


Actually I have no idea about (and therefor no plan) how to deal with on board to conservate fruits and vegetatbles without using a fridge. Lack of space for living on board, and other relevant parameters, e.g. resistance to breakage (of glas bottles) and reducing weight (on light displacement multihull) are very relevant in my understanding.

It would also be interesting to learn about the healthyness aspect of the different methods to conservate food. At the age of 50 plus I became more sensitive to care for my health. Actually I do lots of work-out during winter time, visiting the gym 5-6 times per week, participating in yoga class (for stretching and getting flexible), do cardio training (indoor rowing around 200 km distance monthly).
All that plastic wrapped stuff in the supermarket isn't what I like to have on board. For now I live in Netherlands, and the plastic trash I create weekly on board of the boat is of huge volume. Terrible, doesn't feel good. Nearby evrything I buy in the supermarket is packed in plastic. No chance to avoid it.

For every tip and hint to the different aspects I thank you all in advance, giving me orientation.
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Old 20-01-2019, 10:15   #1435
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Re: Fermentation and Bottling for Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

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Originally Posted by Skip JayR View Post
Hello, sparrowhawk, hello everybody who is interested in healthy cooking on board.

I am very interested in this topic "fermentation". i live for now on board of a small 30 footer (monohull). No Fridge or cooler on board. For now no problem during winter times, as in the storage boards close to the hull its around 6 degrees, as I live in North Europe. As the boat is rented, its not yet a big issue as interims solution... I plan to buy an own boat, preferible a fast multihull (leight weight discplacement trimaran).

Maybe living without a fridge is worth to think about, under different aspects (e.g. less electric power consumption). Since September I live on this boat, and it works, as I can visit daily the supermarket. But how to deal in hot summer times and during sailing far away from catering and grocery shops ?

Switching from a land based life, where its easy to hopp every day into the supermarket to buy fresh food, to a living on board and living during sailing life style requires some good logistic and storage plannings, which I like to learn from the experienced ones. A friend of mine (and colleague as professional sailor) is living on a tiny 24 footer, and his solution without having a freezer/cooler is "fermentation". He is vegetarian ... and looks very healthy, no body overweight and fresh in mind.

Actually I have no clue abouthow to deal with this topic and where to start.

I grew up in the 60s/70s with healthy food, parents and grand parents conservated for winter time during the harvesting summer/autumn lots of fruits, self made jam and vegetables from own garden by bottling and preserving meat from aunt's farm.

As ENG is not my native language, I think the correct term is "home canning", right ?


Actually I have no idea about (and therefor no plan) how to deal with on board to conservate fruits and vegetatbles without using a fridge. Lack of space for living on board, and other relevant parameters, e.g. resistance to breakage (of glas bottles) and reducing weight (on light displacement multihull) are very relevant in my understanding.

It would also be interesting to learn about the healthyness aspect of the different methods to conservate food. At the age of 50 plus I became more sensitive to care for my health. Actually I do lots of work-out during winter time, visiting the gym 5-6 times per week, participating in yoga class (for stretching and getting flexible), do cardio training (indoor rowing around 200 km distance monthly).
All that plastic wrapped stuff in the supermarket isn't what I like to have on board. For now I live in Netherlands, and the plastic trash I create weekly on board of the boat is of huge volume. Terrible, doesn't feel good. Nearby evrything I buy in the supermarket is packed in plastic. No chance to avoid it.

For every tip and hint to the different aspects I thank you all in advance, giving me orientation.
I regularly take food packed in glass jars or drink in glass bottles on our boat - I make sure that they are inside a fabric sleeve made of an old sock and that the containers do not rattle by packing around them with soft materials. Constraining movement is the key.

As for plastic waste - we have a lot of it, don't we? In Canada there is a chain of bulk foods shops that sell many hundreds of products by weight. They will weigh a container that you bring so that you're only paying for the food you buy. This is a concept called "tare weight".

I love home-fermented foods (e.g. kimchi) but unfortunately my husband hates the smell!

Good for you for indoor rowing so far...I feel inspired! It's -15C here today and we've just had half a metre of snow, so after doing some shovelling I'll go on the hamster wheel!
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Old 20-01-2019, 10:22   #1436
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

Oh, and drying food using a food dehydrator has always been successful for us. Or even air drying for herbs, chillies and tomatoes.

We love jam and sweet chutneys as we are originally from England. We make a lot of these and use them on the boat. Also mustards. We make a sweet-sour chutney similar to the "Branston pickle" product that my husband calls "turnip jam"!
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Old 26-01-2019, 08:13   #1437
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

I have found the biggest differential to eating well is learning how to preserve Foods and even growing a little can help so much. I ferment vegetables, solar dehydrate fruit, and have the knowledge and equipment to can meat and beans. I took the sweet potatoes out of one of my planters for micro greens and one of the vines was flowering so I have that growing hydroponically and have been getting four flowers almost daily for the last 2 months. If the temperature is right micro greens are so easy to grow I can't believe more people aren't doing it. Here's what I had for breakfast this morning. broccoli microgreens, fermented chickpeas and garlic, Pecans and almonds that I soaked overnight, Tomatoes and sweet potato flowers, topped with Bragg's and olive oil. I forgot to add the green onion and fresh basil. PS I use the water that the previous batch of garlic was fermented in for the chickpeas, I love being able to just scoop a couple tablespoons of chickpeas whenever I want.Click image for larger version

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And yes that's a big chunk of garlic. when you ferment it it makes it almost mild.
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Old 26-01-2019, 20:22   #1438
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

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Here's what I had for breakfast this morning. broccoli microgreens, fermented chickpeas and garlic, Pecans and almonds that I soaked overnight, Tomatoes and sweet potato flowers, topped with Bragg's and olive oil. I forgot to add the green onion and fresh basil. PS I use the water that the previous batch of garlic was fermented in for the chickpeas, I love being able to just scoop a couple tablespoons of chickpeas whenever I want.
And yes that's a big chunk of garlic. when you ferment it it makes it almost mild.
Very attractive salad! I quite agree about sprouting seeds - I've got arugula, daikon radish and mustard cress going at present. Gives a little zip to anything, including soup, which is much in favor up here right now! It's cold!

When you say, "fermented chickpeas" can you explain? Are they cooked or raw, sprouted?
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Old 26-01-2019, 21:50   #1439
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

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. If the temperature is right micro greens are so easy to grow I can't believe more people aren't doing it.
I totally agree. I used to grow them at home and figured they would be perfect for a live aboard to get fresh veggies
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Old 27-01-2019, 00:03   #1440
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

The chickpeas are cooked. Sprouted and cooked would be even better. I know people that Sprout beans and eat them raw, if you do that you could ferment them raw but I always needed to cook them first. It's actually more of a preservation for about a week then real fermentation, because I eat them before they really start fermenting and prefer the flavor(not strongly vinegar, slightly salty ) garlic on the other hand the longer the better. And no matter what vegetable i ferment I usually put some garlic in with it. I have a quart jar that I put filtered water and 3 tablespoons of sea salt in for my brine and pour that over whatever I'm fermenting. I also rinse most vegetables off before eating so they're not so salty. I prefer straight broccoli microgreens when I have a salad with a lot of other ingredients but some of my other favorite microgreens are radish, fenugreek( fast grower tastes a little bit like licorice), a salad mix that also has alfalfa, radish and clover.
Red amaranth is beautiful but a little bit harder to grow( sometimes it attracts fruit flies or mold ).
Three that I like for steaming or lite sauteing are peas, mung beans and sunflower.
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