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Old 17-06-2017, 10:05   #1381
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Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

Has anyone heard of shrubbery? Not the green variety This is new to me and sounds intriguing. It's fruit concentrates and vinegars (since we are on a vinegar thing). I have not tried it yet but will share first (in a couple posts) since I won't have time before leaving. Here is what I've read.

The history of shrub-making, which dates way beyond even Colonial times, within the pages of his recent book, Shrubs: An Old Fashioned Drink for Modern Times. A shrub is basically fruit, or even vegetables, combined with two other components: sugar and vinegar. After the correct ratio of those ingredients integrate over a little time, the result is a perfect balance of tartness, sugar, acidity, and texture. Shrubs are mouth-watering and concentrated, and they taste amazing when combined with soda water or integrated into a cocktail.

basic shrub cocktail equation

1 ½ to 2 parts base spirit {ex: gin}
1 part complementary flavored liqueur {ex: citrus liqueur}
1/2 part shrub
2 dashes bitters {ex: orange or chamomile bitters}

Just combine those ingredients, along with ice, in a cocktail shaker. Shake thoroughly and strain either served up or over ice, along with a dash of soda. Garnish with an herb sprig, slice of fruit, or citrus wheel. Enjoy!
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Old 17-06-2017, 10:14   #1382
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Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

The sugar they suggest for a shrub is called an Oleo Saccharum. The phrase translates as “oily sugar” and is made by combining sugar** with the zest of citrus and letting it integrate over the course of an hour or so. Adding this zesty sugar to a shrub recipe brightens the shrub and adds a depth of complexity to the mix. They noted that the lemony sugar added a punch of citrus to the raspberry-mint shrub and really balanced the flavors.
** I don't see why it couldn't be made with maple syrup or agave, etc. to make it vegan-though it make change the flavor.

Oleo-Saccharum
Remove the zest of your citrus fruits with a vegetable peeler. You may use the skins of oranges, lemons, or grapefruits. They advise avoiding limes, since their skins are much more bitter.

Be sure to avoid removing the tough, white piths of the citrus, when you’re peeling the zest away.

In a bowl, combine the strips of zest with whatever measurement of sugar your recipe calls for. Using either a cocktail muddler or a sturdy, wooden spoon, really put some elbow grease into pressing the zest into the sugar.

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let it rest for at least an hour.

Remove the peels, once the time has passed. Your oleo-saccharum or “oily sugar” is ready to use!
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Old 17-06-2017, 10:15   #1383
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

blood orange shrub

5 or 6 medium blood oranges, peeled and juiced {yield is about 1 1/2 cups juice}
1/2 cup turbinado or raw sugar
3/4 cup Champagne vinegar or white wine vinegar
Following the oleo-saccharum method above, combine the peeled skins of the oranges {the colored part of the orange peels} with the sugar, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside for at least one hour.
Juice the blood oranges.
Once the oleo-saccharum is ready, remove the pieces of orange zest and add the blood orange juice and the Champagne vinegar to the sugar mixture.
Stir well to dissolve any sugar particles.
Transfer the shrub mixture into a clean jar, seal it, and shake it to further blend the ingredients. Store the shrub mixture in the refrigerator. Allow 2 to 3 days for the flavors to meld, before enjoying.
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Old 17-06-2017, 10:15   #1384
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

strawberry + peppercorn shrub

2 cups strawberries, hulled and quartered
2 lemons, peeled
1 cup cane sugar
1 cup apple cider vinegar
30 black peppercorns, coarsely crushed
Using the oleo-saccharum technique, muddle the lemon peels with the sugar in a bowl. Cover the sugar mixture with plastic wrap and set aside for at least an hour.
Once the hour has passed, remove the peels from the sugar and add the hulled and quartered strawberries, along with the coarsely crushed peppercorns, to the bowl. Stir to incorporate.
Cover the strawberry mixture with plastic wrap, transfer to the refrigerator, and store for two hours.
Remove the mixture from the fridge and muddle the mixture even further, getting out as much juice as possible from the berries.
Add the vinegar to the strawberry mixture. Cover the bowl again, transfer the mixture back into the fridge, and store for two days.
Remove the mixture from the fridge, muddle the berries again and strain through a chinois or fine-mesh strainer into a clean Mason jar.
Store the shrub mixture in the fridge for a week to further integrate the flavors, before enjoying. Shake before using.
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Old 17-06-2017, 10:16   #1385
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

raspberry + mint shrub

2 cups raspberries
1 cup cane sugar
2 lemons, peeled
1/4 cup mint leaves
1 cup apple cider vinegar
Prepare your oleo-saccharum by peeling the skins of the lemons with a vegetable peeler. In a bowl, muddle the peels with the sugar, cover with plastic wrap, and wait for at least an hour.
Add the raspberries and mint to the sugar mixture and muddle the raspberries, expressing some of their juice. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and transfer into the fridge. Let it sit for one day.
Remove the raspberry mix from the fridge, muddle the fruit even more, and then add the vinegar to the mix. Stir to integrate and dissolve the sugar.
Strain the mixture through a chinois or a fine-mesh strainer into a clean Mason jar.
Store the shrub mixture in the refrigerator. Allow 1 week for the flavors to meld, before enjoying. Shake before using.
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Old 17-06-2017, 10:43   #1386
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

There is even a Rum Shrub.

INGREDIENTS
2 ounces dark rum
1/2 ounce shrub syrup (any fruit one you like)
3 ounces club soda, seltzer or tonic water

DIRECTIONS
Fill a tall glass with ice.
Add rum, shrub syrup, and soda.
Stir gently to mix and serve immediately.
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Old 19-06-2017, 17:29   #1387
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

Anyone have any luck with keeping citrus? I've wrapped the limes in foil but it didn't seem to help. Maybe I'll try the paper bag trick for them too.
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Old 19-06-2017, 18:26   #1388
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailor g View Post
Anyone have any luck with keeping citrus? I've wrapped the limes in foil but it didn't seem to help. Maybe I'll try the paper bag trick for them too.
I've kept limes for 3 months, the little limones nacionales from Mexico. Lime availability is seasonal here, and I'm still washing them, drying them, and wrapping them. I'm not treating them with anything, now, but we're not using as many, either.

Washed them all (3 kilos) in Potassium Permanganate and water, according to the instructions, then air dried them. Removed any stem remains first. Then foil wrap, after they're dry.

Pamplemousse, the south seas grapefruits keep very well. I never had good luck with oranges or lemons, though, with the exception of very thick skinned nobbly bush lemons.
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Old 19-06-2017, 21:33   #1389
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

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Originally Posted by JPA Cate View Post
I've kept limes for 3 months, the little limones nacionales from Mexico. Lime availability is seasonal here, and I'm still washing them, drying them, and wrapping them. I'm not treating them with anything, now, but we're not using as many, either.



Washed them all (3 kilos) in Potassium Permanganate and water, according to the instructions, then air dried them. Removed any stem remains first. Then foil wrap, after they're dry.



Pamplemousse, the south seas grapefruits keep very well. I never had good luck with oranges or lemons, though, with the exception of very thick skinned nobbly bush lemons.


Thanks for the information! I will try your method and use the foil again for the limes. We will have four aboard so they will just have to eat up the oranges before they go bad.
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Old 29-06-2017, 09:41   #1390
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

Quote:
Originally Posted by JPA Cate View Post
I've kept limes for 3 months, the little limones nacionales from Mexico. Lime availability is seasonal here, and I'm still washing them, drying them, and wrapping them. I'm not treating them with anything, now, but we're not using as many, either.

Washed them all (3 kilos) in Potassium Permanganate and water, according to the instructions, then air dried them. Removed any stem remains first. Then foil wrap, after they're dry.

Pamplemousse, the south seas grapefruits keep very well. I never had good luck with oranges or lemons, though, with the exception of very thick skinned nobbly bush lemons.
Hi Ann
Thanks for the info.
In the past I have done nothing more with lemons and limes other than keep them in a mesh hammock where air circulation is good. Longevity is variable doing this. I will try your suggestion next time I need to store them long term.

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Old 29-06-2017, 09:57   #1391
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailor g View Post
raspberry + mint shrub

2 cups raspberries
1 cup cane sugar
2 lemons, peeled
1/4 cup mint leaves
1 cup apple cider vinegar
Prepare your oleo-saccharum by peeling the skins of the lemons with a vegetable peeler. In a bowl, muddle the peels with the sugar, cover with plastic wrap, and wait for at least an hour.
Add the raspberries and mint to the sugar mixture and muddle the raspberries, expressing some of their juice. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and transfer into the fridge. Let it sit for one day.
Remove the raspberry mix from the fridge, muddle the fruit even more, and then add the vinegar to the mix. Stir to integrate and dissolve the sugar.
Strain the mixture through a chinois or a fine-mesh strainer into a clean Mason jar.
Store the shrub mixture in the refrigerator. Allow 1 week for the flavors to meld, before enjoying. Shake before using.
I imagine this makes a refreshing drink. It would be sweeter than the raspberry vinegar I make (which would suit many people more) and that is delicious with soda water.

I forgot to post the recipe for raspberry vinaigrette. This is the main thing I use the vinegar for. It is absolutely scrumptious on slightly bitter greens like rocket, and even better with avocado added:

RASPBERRY VINAIGRETTE

¼ cup raspberry vinegar (see post # 1357)
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
½ teaspoon wholegrain mustard
Pinch of freshly ground salt and pepper

Combine all the ingredients in a glass jar and shake well.
The mustard is not just for taste, it helps emulsify the oil and vinegar.
Shake well again before using.

If I have access to good refrigeration I make up four times the quantity and store it in a small bottle. I could eat this by the spoonful .
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Old 04-07-2017, 10:10   #1392
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

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------

Revisiting Ruby Coleslaw (post # 971):

Cabbage is one ingredient I used infrequently before cruising. Its easy availablity in Greece and its excellent longevity made me seek out ways of using it. Some of these recipes have become firm favourites and even when temporarily on land I am making them. Ruby coleslaw is one (Thai style coleslaw also using red cabbage is another).

I find these improve with standing, as the flavours infuse the cabbage and all the white bits turn to crimson after a few hours. The result is a beautifully coloured, glossy, full flavoured mix that makes a lovely crunchy side dish.

I find it best to spoon it into 440g glass jars and pull one out for each meal. Now and again tip the jar over so any dressing seeps down in the reverse direction. Using glass jars rather than plastic bags means the fridge does not smell of cabbage or garlic.

The Ruby Coleslaw recipe is quite versatile. Today I omitted the lemon juice and used more balsamic. I also threw in a seedless chopped hot chilli before pureeing the dressing.

For a super quick summer meal, toss a jar of the coleslaw with some baby spinach leaves and sliced button mushrooms and top with a flaked smoked trout fillet. It literally takes a couple of minutes .

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Old 22-09-2017, 07:56   #1393
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

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The best way I have found of keeping broccoli (which doesn't seem to last long whatever you do to it) is to trim a slice off the stalk and then stand it in a glass of water, like a bunch of flowers. Daily water changes and trimming of the stalk have kept it fresh for me for 4 days after buying, it might have lasted longer but I'd eaten it all by then.

Most herbs and anything with an attached root benefit from water or even water with a drop of plant food. Think of it as short-term hydroponics for your veggies. They want to keep growing - you want them to stay fresh - just give them what they need.

My observation with basil is you're looking at weeks to sustainable shelf-life and easily 25% more flavor via this after-purchase "rehydration" method.
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Old 22-09-2017, 08:01   #1394
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

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Most herbs and anything with an attached root benefit from water or even water with a drop of plant food. Think of it as short-term hydroponics for your veggies. They want to keep growing - you want them to stay fresh - just give them what they need.

My observation with basil is you're looking at weeks to sustainable shelf-life and easily 25% more flavor via this after-purchase "rehydration" method.
I've tried lots of ways to keep herbs fresh and the best I've come across is to keep them dry, wrap in paper towel and then into a plastic box in the fridge. I've kept parsley, coriander and basil for 10 days this way
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Old 25-09-2017, 08:58   #1395
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Re: Mouthwatering Boat Recipes (mainly plant based)

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Most herbs and anything with an attached root benefit from water or even water with a drop of plant food. Think of it as short-term hydroponics for your veggies. They want to keep growing - you want them to stay fresh - just give them what they need.

My observation with basil is you're looking at weeks to sustainable shelf-life and easily 25% more flavor via this after-purchase "rehydration" method.

SecondBase, I have seen them selling herbs with root still on for a great price in the US. I agree they last much longer. Do you keep them in the refrigerator or at room temp? I’ve used them as regular herbs (because I would use it all soon) keeping them in the refrigerator, like NornaBiron mentioned, but thought maybe putting them in a pot like an garden may be better to keep them fresher longer. I may try that when we get back there. Has anyone had experience with them?

I’ve also seen videos of using your veggie scraps, (if you cut them a certain way) that you put in small container, to regrow for your next use too.

I am not a fan of bugs so not sure that would be good or not?
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