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Old 04-03-2021, 17:44   #1
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Thumbs up Superb Rescue by Canadians and Americans

Here is a link to a story about what is in my opinion an heroic rescue in very, very tough conditions. A big hat's off to all involved.

It began in the middle of the night, with the guys in the helicopter using night vision glasses to make the first rescues. Ultimately, efforts to save the 144 ft. scallop trawler failed, but all people were rescued.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/04/w...gtype=Homepage

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Old 04-03-2021, 19:20   #2
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Re: Superb Rescue by Canadians and Americans

Hats off to all involved. They did a good job.
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Old 05-03-2021, 06:08   #3
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Re: Superb Rescue by Canadians and Americans

Here's a further story from our national newspaper, The Globe and Mail:

U.S., Canadian rescue effort saves 31 people before scallop dragger sinks in stormy Atlantic
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.the...ng-vessel-off/

I thought it was wild when one of the Commanders said that it was the highest number of hoists he's ever done in a rescue in his entire career... wow

Cheers,
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Old 05-03-2021, 06:44   #4
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Respect.. Glad everyone got off safely..
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Old 05-03-2021, 09:50   #5
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Re: Superb Rescue by Canadians and Americans

Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleWing77 View Post
Here's a further story from our national newspaper, The Globe and Mail:

U.S., Canadian rescue effort saves 31 people before scallop dragger sinks in stormy Atlantic
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.the...ng-vessel-off/

I thought it was wild when one of the Commanders said that it was the highest number of hoists he's ever done in a rescue in his entire career... wow

Cheers,
LittleWing77

Some of the toughest decisions to make....keep hoisting past max allowable weight or past your minimum fuel reserve..... and further endanger who you have rescued and your crew .....


....or depart and pray who you left behind still make it somehow.



No right answer but plenty of pressure.
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Old 05-03-2021, 10:29   #6
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Re: Superb Rescue by Canadians and Americans

A good rescue by all involved.

However, like most media nowadays, the exaggeration is a bit over the top:


"OTTAWA The situation looked dire for the crew of the Atlantic Destiny. A fire first knocked out power onboard the scallop trawler and then it began taking on water. More than 130 miles away from its home port in Nova Scotia, the 144-foot-long ship was hopelessly bobbing up and down on waves 40 to 80 feet high."

Look at the horizon and the ship. Maybe 15 ft.
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Old 05-03-2021, 10:44   #7
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Re: Superb Rescue by Canadians and Americans

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Originally Posted by captmikem View Post
A good rescue by all involved.

However, like most media nowadays, the exaggeration is a bit over the top:


"OTTAWA The situation looked dire for the crew of the Atlantic Destiny. A fire first knocked out power onboard the scallop trawler and then it began taking on water. More than 130 miles away from its home port in Nova Scotia, the 144-foot-long ship was hopelessly bobbing up and down on waves 40 to 80 feet high."

Look at the horizon and the ship. Maybe 15 ft.

I saw that too...some sort of conversion error? The link to the article LW77 posted seems to have a more realistic number in meters.


Glad all people were rescued without injury.
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Old 05-03-2021, 11:20   #8
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Re: Superb Rescue by Canadians and Americans

"He who saves a life....."

Great work by all involved. Love the Coast Guard - I hope they get increased funding soon.
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Old 05-03-2021, 11:46   #9
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Re: Superb Rescue by Canadians and Americans

This from the NYTimes story:

"When his helicopter lowered a steel cable to start the process, the cable wrapped around a railing on the ship and had to be immediately cut loose. "

I wonder how that happened and what it means "wrapped around a railing"? It must have been very scary - an operating helo tethered to a flailing ship! And just "cut it loose"! Makes it sound simple. I'm sure it was not. Cut under tension - wow. (What could possibly go wrong?!)
The coasties are absolutely amazing during SAR. Well done, as usual.
Bravo Zulu to both coast guards.
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Old 05-03-2021, 12:08   #10
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Re: Superb Rescue by Canadians and Americans

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Originally Posted by Spot View Post
I saw that too...some sort of conversion error? The link to the article LW77 posted seems to have a more realistic number in meters.

Glad all people were rescued without injury.

Great job by all. I got a kick out of the press release describing the waves as big as an apartment building (how many stories?). But perhaps the waves subsided overnight and the picture was taken the next day. In any case didn't the pilots report they were some of the roughest weather they ever had to deal with in a rescue?


Or, I guess 1 meter = 8 ft?



Big question not answered in the article: how does knocking power out lead to ship taking on water? The ship looks big enough and quite beamy to be able to handle very big seas.
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Old 05-03-2021, 12:29   #11
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Re: Superb Rescue by Canadians and Americans

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This from the NYTimes story:

"When his helicopter lowered a steel cable to start the process, the cable wrapped around a railing on the ship and had to be immediately cut loose. "

I wonder how that happened and what it means "wrapped around a railing"? It must have been very scary - an operating helo tethered to a flailing ship! And just "cut it loose"! Makes it sound simple. I'm sure it was not. Cut under tension - wow. (What could possibly go wrong?!)
The coasties are absolutely amazing during SAR. Well done, as usual.
Bravo Zulu to both coast guards.
Its a little scary but crews are prepared for it.

The helo crewman can shear the cable with an explosive cutter instantly at the helo end which may mean no more hoisting. So untangling does have to happen fast. If sheared, there used to be a new hook that could be quick spliced on the cut cable to resume hoisting if there was enough cable left.

Cutting it anywhere lower than the helicopter or having it part is dangerous because it can recoil into the rotor and cut control rods.
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Old 05-03-2021, 12:31   #12
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Re: Superb Rescue by Canadians and Americans

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Originally Posted by waterman46 View Post
Great job by all. I got a kick out of the press release describing the waves as big as an apartment building (how many stories?). But perhaps the waves subsided overnight and the picture was taken the next day. In any case didn't the pilots report they were some of the roughest weather they ever had to deal with in a rescue?


Or, I guess 1 meter = 8 ft?



Big question not answered in the article: how does knocking power out lead to ship taking on water? The ship looks big enough and quite beamy to be able to handle very big seas.
Apparently this trawler has had problems in the past. Poor maintenance? They may well have been leaking as a regular occurance - but when the power cut out they lost the pumps . . .

31 people on a fishing boat is an AWFUL lot. I've never heard of that many except maybe on a factory ship.

Those new Cormorant helicopters our coast guard now have are just incredible machines. I live right across Georgia Strait from Comox where they are based here on the Pacific coast. We see them all the time. Vastly superior to the old Chinooks.

I'm VERY glad everyone is safe. Amazing considering the circumstances.
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Old 05-03-2021, 12:41   #13
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Re: Superb Rescue by Canadians and Americans

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how does knocking power out lead to ship taking on water?
You mean in addition to the normal sources of leakage, like packing glands, shaft seals, etc?

My first guess would be through ventilation ports, then damaged hatches and/or portlights.

Normally, water intrusion through glands, seals and ventilation openings is minimal and handled by pumps. No power - no pumps; vessel takes on water.
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Old 05-03-2021, 12:52   #14
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Re: Superb Rescue by Canadians and Americans

Once you lose the ability to control the boat in rough seas, you may end up rolling far enough that you start taking water through engine room vents, etc. In general, having that happen easily speaks to poor design. But once it starts happening, without pumps or the ability to control the boat's movement through the waves, the problem will only escalate.
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Old 05-03-2021, 19:46   #15
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Re: Superb Rescue by Canadians and Americans

Quote:
Originally Posted by captmikem View Post
A good rescue by all involved.

However, like most media nowadays, the exaggeration is a bit over the top:


"OTTAWA The situation looked dire for the crew of the Atlantic Destiny. A fire first knocked out power onboard the scallop trawler and then it began taking on water. More than 130 miles away from its home port in Nova Scotia, the 144-foot-long ship was hopelessly bobbing up and down on waves 40 to 80 feet high."

Look at the horizon and the ship. Maybe 15 ft.
I don't doubt that 40 to 80 feet is exaggerated, but it's probably also unrealistic to base judgement of the sea state of the whole operation from one photo.
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