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Old 02-08-2022, 10:09   #1
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Inversion vs fraculation - explain

I had never heard of "fraculation" until recently. My understanding is both terms are bending the mast forward but inversion is accidental.

Can anyone explain the theory behind fraculating? Is it always done by trimming a furled headsail? What conditions do you use it? Do you ease and relax it as you tack? What is the risk of pre-mature fraculation (sorry, I couldn't resist)?
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Old 02-08-2022, 17:06   #2
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Re: Inversion vs fraculation - explain

Inversion is where the mast bends forward in the middle. It is a bad thing because the mast in not designed to be bent in that direction.

Fraculation is the opposite of increasing mast rake/bend by applying additional backstay tension.
It is essentially applying additional tension on the forestay or by other means such as a "fraculator line" to straighten the mast, generally to increase drive when sailing downwind. If you are anywhere near a point of sail where you will be tacking you should NOT be fraculating!

Many class rules specifically prohibit fraculation.

If you fraculate so far that you invert the mast, you are likely to be in deep trouble!
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Old 02-08-2022, 20:56   #3
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Re: Inversion vs fraculation - explain

Quote:
Originally Posted by StuM View Post
Inversion is where the mast bends forward in the middle. It is a bad thing because the mast in not designed to be bent in that direction.

Fraculation is the opposite of increasing mast rake/bend by applying additional backstay tension.
It is essentially applying additional tension on the forestay or by other means such as a "fraculator line" to straighten the mast, generally to increase drive when sailing downwind. If you are anywhere near a point of sail where you will be tacking you should NOT be fraculating!

Many class rules specifically prohibit fraculation.

If you fraculate so far that you invert the mast, you are likely to be in deep trouble!
Thanks. Any idea why fraculating works when you are going downwind? Obviously this moves the center of effort forward. However, it would seem this would cause the bow to dig?
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Old 02-08-2022, 21:13   #4
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Re: Inversion vs fraculation - explain

Essentially, it moves the head of the mast forward allowing more clearance between main and spinnaker and promoting cleaner airflow.
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