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Old 17-08-2022, 17:30   #16
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Re: careening, any ideas?

We put WINGS on a tidal grid one time and didn't like it; the short base of the keel made it tippy fore and aft. Could hardly wait for the tide to come in.

Very good friends, however, who had fiberglass damage after a collision with a tree in the Western Indian Ocean, careened near Nosy-Be in Madagascar to do some repairs. It went well.

I almost careened unintentionally on a rock near Lund BC. It would not have been pretty. The rock (about 8 ft across) that my keel was on top of was 10 feet higher than the bottom of surrounding cove and the tide was going out at least 12 feet.
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Old 29-08-2022, 08:26   #17
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Re: careening, any ideas?

"Careening? I think it might be a useful idea. If done at the right time and place." AND with the right boat. We've careened our catamaran without issue. Make sure to scope the area beforehand to ensure the bottom has appropriate firmness and no rocks (the boat could settle on them, resulting in damage). As mentioned, fore and aft anchors (or aft line tied to stout object on shore). Rodes should be taught to avoid back and forth movement that can remove anti-foul from the bottom of keels. This especially if there's any chance of swell / wakes from passing boats. We "back in" an area at full tide, giving 1/2 foot clearance (or about 1 hour from ebb beginning, based on our tidal zone). Going "front in" leaves fewer options to escape if required. The forward anchor can be used to kedge, if necessary. Obviously, never careen at peak high tide, especially if full moon. That will be an expensive mistake.
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Old 29-08-2022, 12:37   #18
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Re: careening, any ideas?

I've learened to pay closer atention to the local forecast.... Some years back I laid a friend's Rival 34 along the side of a stone quay for a scrape and scrub. That went well. What didn't was that halfway through the second side, the wind got up.... and up.... and by the time we had sorted ourselves out, it was blowing 45-50 knots.

Releasing the lines to get her off and turned was a nightmare. With some luck, we managed it.... but she was very close to being driven ashore.





Stateside? Ignore the text. It's of relevance local to England's East Coast creeks....
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Old 30-08-2022, 07:22   #19
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Re: careening, any ideas?

I let my full-keel boat dry out on a sandbar in El Salvador for a bottom scrape. Used legs to try and keep her upright, and found that wooden poles cut from the jungle tend to float, so are hard to keep in place while the tide drops enough to engage them fully. Next time I'll plan it better, with a fixed point for the legs at the bulwark, and guy lines to direct and hold the legs.
Even with the insufficient poles, my careen was a success, and I would definitely do it again.
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Old 30-08-2022, 20:11   #20
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Re: careening, any ideas?

hmmmm



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Old 31-08-2022, 15:38   #21
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Re: careening, any ideas?

Just in case some of you have not realized... careening is laying a monolhull boat on her side on a beach. Drying out on a grid or next to a seawall is a different process, much easier and less stressful, but not available in many places these days. And drying out a multihull is yet another process, and usually much easier yet.

And for what it is worth, the previous owner (and builder) of our boat did careen her on a beach in Alaska some many years ago... and she survived without damage. Dunno if I am that brave, but I know that it is possible!

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Old 31-08-2022, 16:15   #22
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Re: careening, any ideas?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
Just in case some of you have not realized... careening is laying a monolhull boat on her side on a beach. Drying out on a grid or next to a seawall is a different process, much easier and less stressful, but not available in many places these days. And drying out a multihull is yet another process, and usually much easier yet.

And for what it is worth, the previous owner (and builder) of our boat did careen her on a beach in Alaska some many years ago... and she survived without damage. Dunno if I am that brave, but I know that it is possible!

Jim
We almost did it on a volkswagon sized rock surrounded by 15ft of water. Tide went quietly out before we knew were were hard aground. Both the keel and rudder were on that rock. While were were still upright the waterline was already 8 inches out of the water and the tide still had 12 feet to drop. Kedging and powering did not budge the boat.

I was standing on the rock myself scratching my head. Judy was on deck with the motor running. Just then a wake from a far off, unseen, power boat came through the cove where we were stranded and I realized it might lift the rudder if not the keel. I yelled for her to put the engine on full speed ahead and the tiller hard over. When the rudder lifted off momentarily the boat spun on the keel and twisted off the rock. I grabbed the wind vane and swung on board. We were free, basically undamaged. Didn't think about trying to scrape the bottom in that situation.
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Old 31-08-2022, 16:30   #23
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Re: careening, any ideas?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
Just in case some of you have not realized... careening is laying a monolhull boat on her side on a beach. Drying out on a grid or next to a seawall is a different process, much easier and less stressful, but not available in many places these days. And drying out a multihull is yet another process, and usually much easier yet.

And for what it is worth, the previous owner (and builder) of our boat did careen her on a beach in Alaska some many years ago... and she survived without damage. Dunno if I am that brave, but I know that it is possible!

Jim
Some boats like the one I have a Bristol 27 are built for this sort of thing whereas others that are more lightly built maybe not so much

A Bristol 27 with it's strong build and encapsulated full (cutaway) keel can easy handle the careening process.

Photo of my Bristol 27's keel.

Plus photo of Robin Lee Graham and Dove on the beach. (without a mast ladder or climbing harness etc)

Robin Lee Graham careening and working on Dove in link below .....

Notice the outboard which provided his power when not sailing for 3/4's the way around the world on his 24' Lapworth.

https://www.reddit.com/r/sailing/com...cumnavigators/
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Old 31-08-2022, 16:59   #24
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Re: careening, any ideas?

Back in the 1970's a number of us with long keels and protected rudders would gather at Ft. George Inlet on the west side of Little Talbot Island just north of Jacksonville's St. Johns River for "careening parties". ...'not a big crowd, but up to four boats at a time on a sandy beach with ca. 30* slope. We would take a 3-day weekend with successive increasing tides and all leaning away from the water, usually with the bows angled slightly more to shore. We would clean the way down during the ebb and paint at low with a lot of team work and crew that came for the event. We would cook out on the beach and turn the other side too for the next tide cycle. We never were approached by any authority with any inquiries; however, this was North Florida fifty years ago.
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Old 01-09-2022, 06:59   #25
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Re: careening, any ideas?

Not sure I would try this on purpose and it would require a third anchor if you were going to do it over more than one tide cycle, but ...
Early on I was sailing into a creek very late at night and I misread the chart resulting in running aground on a falling tide. Reverse did nothing, so in a panic I rowed out a kedge anchor and using the starboard main winch I accomplished nothing. Still in a panic I rowed out another anchor approximately 90 degrees to the first and warped it to the port main winch. Again nothing. The water continued to fall to the point where I could have walked around the boat without getting my feet wet had I any desire to do so at 3 in the morning.
The boat was perfectly upright. I warned the now exwife that we might flop over, but we might as well get some sleep. We did, and when the tide came back up the tensioned anchor rodes pulled us gently off the sandbar. Would I work under the boat in such a situation? Probably only in an emergency, and only if the kedge anchors were high and dry and easily inspected...
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Old 01-09-2022, 08:19   #26
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Re: careening, any ideas?

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Not sure I would try this on purpose and it would require a third anchor if you were going to do it over more than one tide cycle, but ...
Early on I was sailing into a creek very late at night and I misread the chart resulting in running aground on a falling tide. Reverse did nothing, so in a panic I rowed out a kedge anchor and using the starboard main winch I accomplished nothing. Still in a panic I rowed out another anchor approximately 90 degrees to the first and warped it to the port main winch. Again nothing. The water continued to fall to the point where I could have walked around the boat without getting my feet wet had I any desire to do so at 3 in the morning.
The boat was perfectly upright. I warned the now exwife that we might flop over, but we might as well get some sleep. We did, and when the tide came back up the tensioned anchor rodes pulled us gently off the sandbar. Would I work under the boat in such a situation? Probably only in an emergency, and only if the kedge anchors were high and dry and easily inspected...
This was basically how I stood my boat up to clean it off for a number of years however by taking the ropes I used up over the lower spreaders I much reduced the load on them.

I had three failures all of which were caused by the anchors not holding. The first because an anchor slipped when the retreating tide scoured away from under one side of the keel and the boat gently lay over. The second when a thunder storm caught me during the night and again the boat gently laid over towards the beach. The last was when the rock pulled out and the result is displayed in the images previously posted. The surge washed away from under the keel on this occasion. This was the most serious as the boat toppled over. However. as it was steel the damage was minimal but would have been serious with any less ductile material.

I slip my present boat, it's fiberglass and not as tough as the steely, but if I decided to dry it out standing up I would find a place with a sand bottom and bury a couple of short pieces of log as dead men anchors with rope slings around them rather than just using the anchors. Keeping the restraints as close to horizontal as possible minimizes the horizontal loading.

I considered props but there was two potential problems with them, carrying them and ensuring they stayed in place. It was the staying in place on anything less than a solid rock bottom factor that decided against this option.

The calculations to provide a rough estimate of what possible loads on the ropes could be are fairly simple using some plausible assumptions and I found that using some 3/4" poly cyclone mooring lines I carried, tensioned by the genoa sheets on their winches, was more than sufficient to provide a generous factor of safety.
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Old 01-09-2022, 18:03   #27
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Re: careening, any ideas?

I would think by going over the spreaders you drastically increase the scope needed. Non?
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Old 01-09-2022, 20:32   #28
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Re: careening, any ideas?

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I would think by going over the spreaders you drastically increase the scope needed. Non?
The three failures I experienced were caused by an anchor drag, spring in the catenary, and the shore side anchor pilling out.


The anchor drag occurred because I set my cyclone anchor out of the dingy and did not pull it in hard enough. Had I set it properly at low tide it would not have occurred. The anchor was a monster with a stock about four feet long and was actually to big for the job.

The spring in the catenary could have been prevented by running a second line from close to the anchor or just tightening the line over the spreader some more. One of the reasons I liked that spot was that the keel sat on a limestone rock base and the beach there was a steep sand spill onto the rock. The beach side anchor was a substantial sheoak tree. Consequently the most likely failure mode was a slow collapse onto the steep sand beach.

The shore anchor failure incident occurred because I did not proof test the anchor (large buried rock) hard enough and the surge started the boat rocking back and forth and undercut the sand the keel was resting on. Using the spinaker halyard to a second anchor would have prevented the incident.
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Old 22-05-2024, 15:25   #29
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Re: careening, any ideas?

A careening vid I found on YT.
If you have tidal range equivalent or more than your draft,plus a clean patch of beach,you can do it.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?si=xcs...ature=youtu.be
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Old 15-06-2024, 05:36   #30
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Re: careening, any ideas?

Careening/beaching in Maine using crab(crib) video.
He pump sprays the bottom with,I presume, chlorine bleach to kill organisms.


https://www.youtube.com/shorts/bhmTjdgNviM
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