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Old 11-11-2019, 17:05   #46
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Re: OMG, I bought a sailboat... Now what?! And hello!

If you're new to boating, I would recommend you take some classes from the Power Squadron (America's Boating Club) and American Sailing Association(ASA). It will give you some confidence before you get out on the water.

It definitely hleped me when I jumped in with both feet like yourself.
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Old 11-11-2019, 17:34   #47
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Re: OMG, I bought a sailboat... Now what?! And hello!

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Thanks, but mine was built about five years before the requirement for hull ID numbers. Even the surveyor couldn't find one.
You are correct!
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Old 11-11-2019, 18:15   #48
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Re: OMG, I bought a sailboat... Now what?! And hello!

Oh, I'm following along for sure.
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Old 11-11-2019, 18:47   #49
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Re: OMG, I bought a sailboat... Now what?! And hello!

OMG... I did the same thing! Live in Texas close to the Gulf... Looked for a seaworthy Vessel there... but no... Bought one in Northern Washington! Never sailed the West Coast...had no plans to...I love storms and high seas... my wife is fairweather (admittedly - who doesnt like fair weather). So - Race down the coast, cross the Canal, stop in Isla Mujeres and enter the Gulf where I call home??? or!!! Set the watch to sailing time and Enjoy the Seasons around San Juan Islands, Victoria, Vancouver...Then a Month in San Francisco Bay area??? Ahhhhgghg. Not my plans but checking my watch... its still sailing time just need to learn the North West... and I need a slip??? Boat is on the hard in Anacortes. Anyone know of a good slip in the area please let me know... Have a 50' Herreshoff (54' total).

I am looking forward to the next three seasons in the west. but when I head South... aint coming back. I do like 106 deg days in Texas... Headed to Costa Rica as soon as We get our fill of the San Juans. Ideas are always welcome! It is not the wind that determines my direction but the set of the sail.

Scott T
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Old 11-11-2019, 19:28   #50
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Re: OMG, I bought a sailboat... Now what?! And hello!

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Originally Posted by AnglaisInHull View Post
I can relate - we just finished our third season as sailboat owners. Yes we had some experience with charters and other people's boats, but it's different when it's yours and it's just you.

First season: Lots of surprises, plenty of screw-ups, learning where everything is and how it works (and how to fix it). Frequently asked myself "Oh, crap, what have I done?"

Second season: Basics under control, learned a lot about the different systems, how to handle this particular boat, more about maintenance.

Third season: Wonderful! No panics, few surprises. We know how it works, are improving our skills and trying new things. Operations and maintenance are routine. Why didn't we do this twenty years earlier?

Enjoy!
I finally got to buy mine last fall. O'Day 28. I also have 3 dogs and the same wife.

My advice: in addition to reading everything, take a navigation class from power squadron or anywhere else, and also take ASA 101 and 103. These latter get you out on other boats with experienced people. I did those courses more than once each actually and the second time was in bad weather and all kinds of wind for three days, so when I found myself in bad conditions this year I knew I could handle it.

Like this poster said, I had a "go slow" plan. The first few times I went out things did not work, small things broke and I was very demoralized. But I kept going, kept fixing, and kept learning. By mid summer the boat was consistent, and by August it was fast. I still have not gone very far out, as I live on a big bay, but that is next year. I keep lists of the goals and skills I want to target the next two years.

When I see new boat owners try to take their boats a long distance to a home port on their first time out it blows my mind. I would have sunk, with all the things that went wrong. But now I would be much more able. And I am confident that I bought a great boat.

PS: The surveyors don't find everything. You will.
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Old 11-11-2019, 20:27   #51
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Re: OMG, I bought a sailboat... Now what?! And hello!

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Originally Posted by Scottt View Post
OMG... I did the same thing! Live in Texas close to the Gulf... Looked for a seaworthy Vessel there... but no... Bought one in Northern Washington! Never sailed the West Coast...had no plans to...I love storms and high seas... my wife is fairweather (admittedly - who doesnt like fair weather). So - Race down the coast, cross the Canal, stop in Isla Mujeres and enter the Gulf where I call home??? or!!! Set the watch to sailing time and Enjoy the Seasons around San Juan Islands, Victoria, Vancouver...Then a Month in San Francisco Bay area??? Ahhhhgghg. Not my plans but checking my watch... its still sailing time just need to learn the North West... and I need a slip??? Boat is on the hard in Anacortes. Anyone know of a good slip in the area please let me know... Have a 50' Herreshoff (54' total).

I am looking forward to the next three seasons in the west. but when I head South... aint coming back. I do like 106 deg days in Texas... Headed to Costa Rica as soon as We get our fill of the San Juans. Ideas are always welcome! It is not the wind that determines my direction but the set of the sail.

Scott T
I'm moored in Port of Everett. Plenty of room and only 7/ft.
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Old 12-11-2019, 09:59   #52
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Re: OMG, I bought a sailboat... Now what?! And hello!

You should have a way in your state to have the boat inspected and given a hull number. It will likely be required when leasing a slip or getting insurance or registering the boat or any number of things. This is a good thing to have the seller take care of before you write that check.


Knowledge is power. Knowledge is safety. Knowledge is fun. Your education should start with keeping the boat afloat. That is, knowing where all thru hulls and seacocks are, how to operate your bilge pumps, and yes that is plural, what to do when they don't work. How to fix basic stuff that will reduce the chances of fire or flooding or breakaway.



Then, before you take the boat out, learn the Rules of the Road. REALLY learn them. This is extremely important. If you are a sailboat and you are obviously sailing but you have your engine running, are you still a sailing vessel? The answer might surprise you. Is the number of white lights showing on a boat's mast at night important? CLUE: yes, it is. Does it matter whether a masthead light shows all around or if it doesn't show from directly astern? Yes it does. Why? Does a sailboat have "right of way" over a power boat? NO! How come? You have always been told that! What does it mean when you are sailing down a narrow channel and a power boat behind you sounds one short blast on his whistle? Two blasts? 5 blasts? What do you do? Do you answer back? You see a boat with a red light, white light, and red light showing in a vertical line. What does that signify? How about two red lights... will he change course to avoid you? You are on the port tack and another sailboat is on the starboard tack, and his relative bearing is not changing but he is getting closer. What do you do? What do you do if he doesn't change course? It is night and you are crossing astern of a tugboat and ahead of another vessel with green and red side lights but no mast lights. The tug has a yellow light over his stern light. Do you have a problem, or not? You see a boat or ship with two black balls in his rigging. What does that mean? Will he move out of the way for you? How about a basket? A diamond shape? Does a broom in the rigging mean anything? You hear three short blasts from a ship maneuvering in a harbor. Where is the most dangerous place for you to be? I could ask you a hundred questions and barely touch on the Rules and how they apply to real world situations where misunderstandings can lead to collisions or even DEATH. In fact, as I recall, the USCG has about 1016 questions to ask just about Rules. This is all seriously detailed but seriously important. Rules of the Road seriously is a life or death thing to learn and know, and know VERY WELL.


Learning to actually sail the boat is easy. You can pretty much teach yourself the basics with a "Sailing for Dummies" book, on a weekday in some location away from commercial traffic. That part isn't hard. Knowing emergency procedures and important safety practices and regulations takes a little longer. The USCG Power Squadron course is a good introduction to all that and any ASA sailing school, for a bit more money, can teach you all that, too.



Finally, maintenance and upkeep, and your responsibilities as a boat owner. Lots of good books on all that, but maybe your best resource is your marina neighbors. Hang out. Have a few beers. Cook some burgers if your marina allows it. Invite yourself to dock parties and potlucks. Ask racing boat skippers if they need some inexperienced crew. Get to know people where the main topic of conversation is often the stuff you need to know.



You have a nice learner boat there. So learn. Don't try to force the wife OR the dogs onto the boat just yet, until you have soaked up some knowledge and have at least a hundred miles under your keel on day sails. Then get her involved socially before trying to get her out on the water. Maybe a moonlight getaway, a calm and deserted anchorage on a pleasant night, will get her kind of liking the idea of going sailing with you. Dogs, try them one at a time. You might have to resort to doggie treat bribery. Get life jackets for the dogs. Yes, that's a thing. It is very likely that they will jump overboard to chase some bird or fish or turtle or gator or whatever. Don't keep them below... let them see the horizon or you may regret it. And don't figure on a big family cruise to Bermuda on that boat. Day sails, occasional overnights, that might work.
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Old 12-11-2019, 10:41   #53
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Re: OMG, I bought a sailboat... Now what?! And hello!

Quote:
Originally Posted by GrowleyMonster View Post
You should have a way in your state to have the boat inspected and given a hull number. It will likely be required when leasing a slip or getting insurance or registering the boat or any number of things. This is a good thing to have the seller take care of before you write that check.


Knowledge is power. Knowledge is safety. Knowledge is fun. Your education should start with keeping the boat afloat. That is, knowing where all thru hulls and seacocks are, how to operate your bilge pumps, and yes that is plural, what to do when they don't work. How to fix basic stuff that will reduce the chances of fire or flooding or breakaway.



Then, before you take the boat out, learn the Rules of the Road. REALLY learn them. This is extremely important. If you are a sailboat and you are obviously sailing but you have your engine running, are you still a sailing vessel? The answer might surprise you. Is the number of white lights showing on a boat's mast at night important? CLUE: yes, it is. Does it matter whether a masthead light shows all around or if it doesn't show from directly astern? Yes it does. Why? Does a sailboat have "right of way" over a power boat? NO! How come? You have always been told that! What does it mean when you are sailing down a narrow channel and a power boat behind you sounds one short blast on his whistle? Two blasts? 5 blasts? What do you do? Do you answer back? You see a boat with a red light, white light, and red light showing in a vertical line. What does that signify? How about two red lights... will he change course to avoid you? You are on the port tack and another sailboat is on the starboard tack, and his relative bearing is not changing but he is getting closer. What do you do? What do you do if he doesn't change course? It is night and you are crossing astern of a tugboat and ahead of another vessel with green and red side lights but no mast lights. The tug has a yellow light over his stern light. Do you have a problem, or not? You see a boat or ship with two black balls in his rigging. What does that mean? Will he move out of the way for you? How about a basket? A diamond shape? Does a broom in the rigging mean anything? You hear three short blasts from a ship maneuvering in a harbor. Where is the most dangerous place for you to be? I could ask you a hundred questions and barely touch on the Rules and how they apply to real world situations where misunderstandings can lead to collisions or even DEATH. In fact, as I recall, the USCG has about 1016 questions to ask just about Rules. This is all seriously detailed but seriously important. Rules of the Road seriously is a life or death thing to learn and know, and know VERY WELL.


Learning to actually sail the boat is easy. You can pretty much teach yourself the basics with a "Sailing for Dummies" book, on a weekday in some location away from commercial traffic. That part isn't hard. Knowing emergency procedures and important safety practices and regulations takes a little longer. The USCG Power Squadron course is a good introduction to all that and any ASA sailing school, for a bit more money, can teach you all that, too.



Finally, maintenance and upkeep, and your responsibilities as a boat owner. Lots of good books on all that, but maybe your best resource is your marina neighbors. Hang out. Have a few beers. Cook some burgers if your marina allows it. Invite yourself to dock parties and potlucks. Ask racing boat skippers if they need some inexperienced crew. Get to know people where the main topic of conversation is often the stuff you need to know.



You have a nice learner boat there. So learn. Don't try to force the wife OR the dogs onto the boat just yet, until you have soaked up some knowledge and have at least a hundred miles under your keel on day sails. Then get her involved socially before trying to get her out on the water. Maybe a moonlight getaway, a calm and deserted anchorage on a pleasant night, will get her kind of liking the idea of going sailing with you. Dogs, try them one at a time. You might have to resort to doggie treat bribery. Get life jackets for the dogs. Yes, that's a thing. It is very likely that they will jump overboard to chase some bird or fish or turtle or gator or whatever. Don't keep them below... let them see the horizon or you may regret it. And don't figure on a big family cruise to Bermuda on that boat. Day sails, occasional overnights, that might work.

I have an assigned VIN from the DMV, but not an actual stamped-into-the-boat build number. There's a guy in the same marina, with the same boat, his hull number was something like 34. out of 211 built. his is stamped on the hull near the rear of the cockpit. mine has no such stamp, so maybe mine is hull # 1 or 2 or... who knows. I also already have insurance and registration and a slip which it is in with a moorage agreement.

to your second point, I know where all the through-hulls are, and how to operate a bilge pump, both manual and automatic and electric-manual. I have extensive boating experience on commercial fishing vessels in both WA and Alaska, on a couple of those boats I was even the mechanic. I can fix almost anything. Building from scratch, well, thats another story.

3rd point. I have taken the safe boaters course, which covered all of this. I have been studying extensively. I am ambitious and adventurous, but not completely stupid (Just partially stupid). I know a good bit about anchor lights, running lights, audible signaling devices, etc. I'm no master sailor, but I am not a complete virgin.

as far as the wife, she's a tad anti-social, but she seems to be getting a touch interested in the boat. Especially since she saw me easily motor it over to the slip, and heard the launch guy at the marina (who I have befriended) keep saying such great things about my particular boat.

The dogs, Definitely going to be a "tempt them with treats" thing. Already have doggie life-jackets covered, they are boxers. Boxers dont swim too well, and ours love to go to the lake with us, so we've got the doggie life-vests already. But, thanks for looking out! I'm sure plenty of people never even think about that. Also, here, we have a healthy variety sharks and Orca whales and sea lions. I'm sure to all three of them, a dog in the water looks like a tasty easy treat. I'll do my best to keep them IN THE BOAT. I was going to put netting along the lifelines to help keep them in.
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Old 12-11-2019, 12:31   #54
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Re: OMG, I bought a sailboat... Now what?! And hello!

I am a wife in a similar situation, and she needs to go sailing with someone who knows what they are doing, in order to enjoy it if it isn't her dream. So the ladies only sailing school is a great idea ( I am learning slowly from my husband who sailed as a kid and still has lots to learn).
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Old 12-11-2019, 15:03   #55
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Re: OMG, I bought a sailboat... Now what?! And hello!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Morgali View Post
I have an assigned VIN from the DMV, but not an actual stamped-into-the-boat build number. There's a guy in the same marina, with the same boat, his hull number was something like 34. out of 211 built. his is stamped on the hull near the rear of the cockpit. mine has no such stamp, so maybe mine is hull # 1 or 2 or... who knows. I also already have insurance and registration and a slip which it is in with a moorage agreement.

to your second point, I know where all the through-hulls are, and how to operate a bilge pump, both manual and automatic and electric-manual. I have extensive boating experience on commercial fishing vessels in both WA and Alaska, on a couple of those boats I was even the mechanic. I can fix almost anything. Building from scratch, well, thats another story.

3rd point. I have taken the safe boaters course, which covered all of this. I have been studying extensively. I am ambitious and adventurous, but not completely stupid (Just partially stupid). I know a good bit about anchor lights, running lights, audible signaling devices, etc. I'm no master sailor, but I am not a complete virgin.

as far as the wife, she's a tad anti-social, but she seems to be getting a touch interested in the boat. Especially since she saw me easily motor it over to the slip, and heard the launch guy at the marina (who I have befriended) keep saying such great things about my particular boat.

The dogs, Definitely going to be a "tempt them with treats" thing. Already have doggie life-jackets covered, they are boxers. Boxers dont swim too well, and ours love to go to the lake with us, so we've got the doggie life-vests already. But, thanks for looking out! I'm sure plenty of people never even think about that. Also, here, we have a healthy variety sharks and Orca whales and sea lions. I'm sure to all three of them, a dog in the water looks like a tasty easy treat. I'll do my best to keep them IN THE BOAT. I was going to put netting along the lifelines to help keep them in.

Ah well you have a foot in the door, then. The various study guides for the Rules element of the USCG deck licenses will help you a lot. There are flash cards and other study aids that will help, too. Most of the various "safe boater" courses barely touch on Rules. You need an official printed copy, too. Not legally required to have aboard a boat your size, but yeah, you need it. It is a good reference and it will give you confidence when you hit those moments where you aren't sure what you are looking at or what you are supposed to do. And sooner or later, that WILL happen. What color flare would a submarine about to surface, fire? I pride myself on my knowledge of the Rules but honestly I don't know. I know where to find it, though.



Netting is a very good idea. Having only one dog at a time on the boat will help you to keep a closer eye on the dog. Eventually they will probably learn to love taking a sail. Dogs are pretty good at picking up the vibes from their owners when they experience pleasure at some experience.
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