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Old 22-02-2017, 08:55   #1
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Greetings from Dry Land

Hello Community! A little about myself. I live in the exciting sailing mecca of Columbus, Ohio (kidding). As I get older and more financially sound, I find myself yearning for a sailboat and the freedom to just see what is over that next horizon. Call it a mid-life crisis if you want, but my interest keeps edging toward reading things like Dove, Sailing Made Easy, and this forum. Although my wife has little desire to be on a boat (she got seasick once as a teen on a ferry on Lake Erie), she just purchased adult sailing lessons at the local reservoir. I was in tears after opening.

After 20+ years flying helicopters in the Army, deployments, combat in Iraq, and leading a life not considered risk-averse, I envy those who wake up to see a sunrise with the sound of lapping waves. I enter this hobby with eyes wide open as to the cost, maintenance, living restrictions, frustrations, etc. But, I'm also guessing there must be something to this as millions over history have been drawn by the sea. I am just another feeling the tug. Bon chance!

MajorKaos Out
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Old 22-02-2017, 09:04   #2
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Re: Greetings from Dry Land

Welcome and ... wow! Your enthusiasm reminds me why I started this in the first place. This is a great place to learn and tell.your wife to search sea sickness threads on this forum. There's a lot of us here and it's not insurmountable. Have fun
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Old 23-02-2017, 09:02   #3
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Re: Greetings from Dry Land

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Originally Posted by MajorKaos View Post
Hello Community! A little about myself. I live in the exciting sailing mecca of Columbus, Ohio (kidding). As I get older and more financially sound, I find myself yearning for a sailboat and the freedom to just see what is over that next horizon. Call it a mid-life crisis if you want, but my interest keeps edging toward reading things like Dove, Sailing Made Easy, and this forum. Although my wife has little desire to be on a boat (she got seasick once as a teen on a ferry on Lake Erie), she just purchased adult sailing lessons at the local reservoir. I was in tears after opening.

After 20+ years flying helicopters in the Army, deployments, combat in Iraq, and leading a life not considered risk-averse, I envy those who wake up to see a sunrise with the sound of lapping waves. I enter this hobby with eyes wide open as to the cost, maintenance, living restrictions, frustrations, etc. But, I'm also guessing there must be something to this as millions over history have been drawn by the sea. I am just another feeling the tug. Bon chance!

MajorKaos Out
I was born and raised in Dublin Ohio, left for 4 years while I was in the navy just to return after. I stayed there for about 3 years then jetted to CT. I learned to sail there by purchasing a boat and just going out. Wife and I had Elfin our Cal 22 for 4 years, best investment we ever made. It didn't have any ROI financially but for our relaxation and mood it made all the difference. We recently sold it, due to not wanting to move it south as we moved to Hampton Roads, VA. We are planning to purchase a larger sailboat in the next few years. The dream is an AMEL Super Marmu or an Outbound 44/46.

Best wishes to you and your wife as you learn to sail. What I would say is sailing on the Reservoir (The one near new Albany?) will be good for teaching you point of sail, what each line does, basics like port and starboard and who has right-of-way. I must say, this is VERY important, can't tell you how many times people have no clue which boat has rights.
What I would keep in mind is that it will not be the same as going out on long island sound, or your closed big body of water Lake Erie. I mean that to encourage you to go up to lake erie for a sail. I think you will love it even more!
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Old 23-02-2017, 09:39   #4
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Re: Greetings from Dry Land

Good luck, sir. I'm a year out on the enlisted end, and am going through the civilian side of helicopter school now. Air is a fluid, water is a fluid. I was quite excited to learn about the similarities of sails and wings, and how the same principles apply to the hull.

I enjoyed reading Two Years Before the Mast. Talk about grit. You should be able to find it for free on Kindle. It's a(no "n") historical account of a guy who was having health issues that shipped out on a merchant ship involved in the fur trade.

On the more recent side, I've enjoyed reading Beth Leonard's The Voyager's Handbook, and Chris White's The Cruising Multihull.

If you don't own a house, I'd suggest investing in a comparably sized RV (or a tiny house) of what you're looking for on the boat end, with options of
a) finding a friend with land and hookups (not the keyboard suggested "benefits..." Seriously Google)
b) cheap rent at an RV park (MWR has good prices for retirees, not necessarily geared for long term stays on paper, but if you're providing income and they have space, they'll usually let you stay. At Fort Bliss, we payed $432/mo, and were surrounded by the military community, retirees payed around $400/mo)
c) Find a cheap plot of land (lakefront?) And live there cheaply.

In addition to getting rid of stuff, RV systems and marine systems have a little in common. You at least get the fun/practice of troubleshooting problems, balancing electric draw, figuring out a head that works (and how it works), and save more without having to worry as much about flipping a house when it's time to go (and no property taxes if you don't buy land). Plus it's so much easier to relocate; flat pack on the floor, hook up, and go. Weight saving (displacement) is also a necessary practice.

Well, ****. That went on a little longer than intended. Good luck, and happy sailing.
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Old 24-02-2017, 06:08   #5
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Re: Greetings from Dry Land

Greetings and welcome aboard the CF, Major.
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