Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 18-04-2019, 06:42   #151
Registered User
 
SailOar's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 619
Re: In The News

You now can bid on your very own T. Rex skeleton on eBay. Unfortunately, returns are not accepted.



YOUNG (BABY) T-REX TYRANNOSAURUS DINOSAUR FOSSIL
__________________

__________________
The greatest deception men suffer is their own opinions.
- Leonardo da Vinci -
SailOar is offline  
Old 18-04-2019, 08:28   #152
Senior Cruiser
 
GordMay's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 38,198
Images: 241
Re: In The News

Mueller Report on the Investigation into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election
(Vol I of II - redacted)https://www.justice.gov/storage/report.pdf

"Once the redacted version of the report* has been released to the public, the Justice Department plans to make available for review by a limited number of Members of Congress and their staff a copy of the Special Counsel's report without certain redactions," prosecutors wrote in a court filing on Wednesday. They wrote that the less-redacted version would not be made public or made available for all members of Congress.

Though very important news, this subject is NOT appropriate for discussion, on the CruisersForum.
I provide this link, only that interested parties may privately inform themselves.
I WILL report ANY discussion, around this subject, to the Moderation team.


On May 17, 2017, Robert S. Mueller III was appointed by acting Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein to serve as Special Counsel by the order below.
Office of the Attorney General
ORDER NO. 3915-2017
APPOINTMENT OF SPECIAL COUNSEL TO INVESTIGATE RUSSIAN INTERFERENCE WITH THE 2016 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION AND RELATED MATTERS
* ➥ https://www.justice.gov/opa/press-re...67231/download


I repeat, this subject is NOT appropriate for discussion, on the CF.
__________________

__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline  
Old 18-04-2019, 16:24   #153
Moderator
 
a64pilot's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Jacksonville/ out cruising
Boat: Island Packet 38
Posts: 31,048
In The News

My cave instructor, very good friend and mentor has had another successful cave diver rescue today.
Rescues of cave divers are extremely rare, before Edd, I think it happened twice, itís about as likely as saving a parachutist, and for the same reason, usually itís extremely time limited, you only have so much air.

Edd has saved either four or five divers now, a phenomenal number.

By the way, anyone who is wanting to get cave certified, could do a lot worse than getting Edd to teach them, his shop is in Marianna Fl. And there are many cave systems around, including my favorite, Jackson Blue which has miles of diveable cave.
https://youtu.be/cDOIjadX354
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edd_Sorenson
a64pilot is online now  
Old 19-04-2019, 03:33   #154
Senior Cruiser
 
GordMay's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 38,198
Images: 241
Re: In The News

Quote:
Originally Posted by a64pilot View Post
My cave instructor, very good friend and mentor has had another successful cave diver rescue today...
Josh Bratchley, was retrieved safely by Edd Sorenson
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...nessee-n995691


More good news:
Why Sleeping on Your Stomach Leads to More Erotic Dreams
https://www.medicaldaily.com/why-sle...-dreams-241863
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline  
Old 21-04-2019, 01:10   #155
Registered User
 
AndyEss's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Sea of Cortez/northern Utah/ Wisconsin/ La Paz, BCS
Boat: Hans Christian 38 Mk II
Posts: 643
Images: 1
Re: In The News

https://www.livescience.com/65276-16...gn=20190420-ls
16th Century Dutch shipwreck found in North Sea.
AndyEss is offline  
Old 21-04-2019, 01:59   #156
Senior Cruiser
 
GordMay's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 38,198
Images: 241
Re: In The News

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndyEss View Post
Interesting.
The shipwreck represents three key developments in Dutch history:
a pivotal change in shipbuilding techniques (clinker to carvel construction)
the growth of the Dutch economy after the 1500s
and the introduction of copper coinage.
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline  
Old 22-04-2019, 07:19   #157
Senior Cruiser
 
GordMay's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 38,198
Images: 241
Re: In The News

Earth Day—April 22—marks the anniversary of the birth of the modern environmental movement in 1970.
It’s hard to believe, but 49 years ago a new awareness of our environmental responsibilities was born. The founding of Earth Day marked an important moment in time, a pivotal recognition of how precious and fragile and sacred our connection is to our natural world.
The Earth Day Network works year round to solve climate change, to end plastic pollution, to protect endangered species, and to broaden, educate, and activate the environmental movement across the globe.
https://www.earthday.org/


The first-ever Earth Day and its evolution into a global event
https://www.cbc.ca/archives/the-firs...vent-1.5083110
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline  
Old 22-04-2019, 08:46   #158
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Fiji Airways/ Lake Ontario
Boat: Want a B430!
Posts: 1,444
Images: 10
Re: In The News

Lake Erie still has 250sq.m of ice. The ice boom in Niagara River is being removed for the season. Perhaps incomprehensible to some southern boaters...


https://www.syracuse.com/state/2019/...-to-begin.html


Live cameras: scroll down a bit to see all that wonderful ice. https://iceboom.nypa.gov/
Tetepare is offline  
Old 24-04-2019, 05:53   #159
Moderator
 
a64pilot's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Jacksonville/ out cruising
Boat: Island Packet 38
Posts: 31,048
Re: In The News

Eddís video of the cave rescue, itís the Dive itself for those that are interested.
https://youtu.be/8y6pUXo32YU
a64pilot is online now  
Old 25-04-2019, 12:16   #160
Senior Cruiser
 
GordMay's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 38,198
Images: 241
Re: In The News

Nearly 200 Great Barrier Reef coral species also live in the deep sea.
Thatís six times as many species as previously thought to be living in the dark, cold waters off northeastern Australia, researchers report*.
Perhaps more important than the number of species cataloged at those depths, is the fact that every evolutionary family of reef-building coral is represented, offering a potential boon for conservation efforts.
As climate change makes some ocean waters warmer, corals are experiencing more frequent severe bleaching events than they did just a few decades ago. Scientists are trying to learn which species might be able to survive, and where, as ocean conditions change.
From 2010 to 2016, Muir and his colleagues sampled 1,263 corals at depths between 30 meters to 125 meters. That range falls within a region called the mesophotic zone, because it receives relatively little sunlight. From those samples, as well as museum specimens and other data, the team identified 195 coral species living in this zone, most of which were previously thought to inhabit only shallow waters.
The finding provides support for the ďdeep reef refugiaĒ hypothesis, the hotly debated idea that deep ocean corals are somewhat protected from the effects of climate change, and could one day help reestablish damaged shallow water reefs. But while researchers may know more about which corals can live in this deep ocean region, itís unclear how common those corals are; or how they would fare if transplanted to shallower environments.
ďHigh species richness and lineage diversity of reef corals in the mesophotic zoneĒ ~ by Paul R. Muir et al.
https://royalsocietypublishing.org/d...rspb.2018.1987
https://figshare.com/collections/Sup..._zone_/4320827
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline  
Old 26-04-2019, 14:29   #161
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Devon, UK
Posts: 137
Re: In The News

Quote:
Originally Posted by GordMay View Post
Nearly 200 Great Barrier Reef coral species also live in the deep sea.
That’s six times as many species as previously thought to be living in the dark, cold waters off northeastern Australia, researchers report*.
Perhaps more important than the number of species cataloged at those depths, is the fact that every evolutionary family of reef-building coral is represented, offering a potential boon for conservation efforts.
As climate change makes some ocean waters warmer, corals are experiencing more frequent severe bleaching events than they did just a few decades ago. Scientists are trying to learn which species might be able to survive, and where, as ocean conditions change.
From 2010 to 2016, Muir and his colleagues sampled 1,263 corals at depths between 30 meters to 125 meters. That range falls within a region called the mesophotic zone, because it receives relatively little sunlight. From those samples, as well as museum specimens and other data, the team identified 195 coral species living in this zone, most of which were previously thought to inhabit only shallow waters.
The finding provides support for the “deep reef refugia” hypothesis, the hotly debated idea that deep ocean corals are somewhat protected from the effects of climate change, and could one day help reestablish damaged shallow water reefs. But while researchers may know more about which corals can live in this deep ocean region, it’s unclear how common those corals are; or how they would fare if transplanted to shallower environments.
“High species richness and lineage diversity of reef corals in the mesophotic zone” ~ by Paul R. Muir et al.
https://royalsocietypublishing.org/d...rspb.2018.1987
https://figshare.com/collections/Sup..._zone_/4320827

Or to put it another way...


Out of 400 odd shallow water corals species surveyed (<30m depth), only 13 (3%) are found at depths below 45 meters!

The ‘deep dark’ bit of the ocean begins where usable light ends (see light attenuation vs PAR) for zooxanthella, errrrr around 45 meters!!!

As mentioned in a previous thread, the ‘cold’ bit allows corals less dependency on light due to increased zooplankton (heterotrophic feeding).

Quote:
Nearly 200 Great Barrier Reef coral species also live in the deep sea. That’s six times as many species as previously thought to be living in the dark
So that’s up from the 33 different shallow water coral sp. previously thought to be living between 30-125 meters? not sure those numbers are correct unless I’m missing something? I’m sure I counted more on my last dive

Quote:
The finding provides support for the “deep reef refugia” hypothesis, the hotly debated idea that deep ocean corals are somewhat protected from the effects of climate change, and could one day help reestablish damaged shallow water reefs.
If the shallow waters one day return to the recent ‘ideal’ baseline interplay between water temperature, chemistry, sunlight and plankton? Not convinced, still swaying towards the idea of a few corals surviving rapid change over the next 100ish years with the possibility of reefs returning (in some form) in the next million years or so using a combination of plasticity, adaptation and evolution. A more realistic Refugia hypothesis based on ancient history (realistic time frame).

Quote:
Perhaps more important than the number of species cataloged at those depths, is the fact that every evolutionary family of reef-building coral is represented, offering a potential boon for conservation efforts.
Yes!!! If anyone’s interested in the more evolutionary important bit have a look at ‘EDGE corals’ criteria.

EDGE Corals | EDGE of Existence

Quote:
In 2011 the EDGE programme produced the EDGE Corals list which highlights the top 25 Evolutionary Distinct and Globally Endangered coral species
Gordmay, I’d chalk your original post up to a study 6 years in the making having to have something newsworthy to report

(Not that I’d refute the genuinely original and valid bits of the study, all goes towards building a bigger better picture)
Puddleduck is offline  
Old 26-04-2019, 15:13   #162
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Devon, UK
Posts: 137
Re: In The News

Quote:
Nearly 200 Great Barrier Reef coral species also live in the deep sea. Thatís six times as many species as previously thought to be living in the dark
Quote:
So thatís up from the 33 different shallow water coral sp. previously thought to be living between 30-125 meters? not sure those numbers are correct unless Iím missing something? Iím sure I counted more on my last dive
No actually if your talking about the dark (more than 45m), then that would make 2 corals previously thought to be living in the dark (1/6th of the 13 different sp.)?

Sorry Iíve been drinking
Puddleduck is offline  
Old 27-04-2019, 06:09   #163
Senior Cruiser
 
GordMay's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 38,198
Images: 241
Re: In The News

Watch firefighters save a cat from a tree.
Also, the cat is actually a cougar.
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/briti...ting-1.5113695


Thanks for your critique, and the link, Puddleduck.
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline  
Old 28-04-2019, 12:23   #164
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Devon, UK
Posts: 137
Re: In The News

Quote:
Originally Posted by GordMay View Post
Thanks for your critique, and the link, Puddleduck.
More of a drunken rant!



In other news....

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/...prospect-life/

Quote:
'Zombie' pig brains revived as scientists raise prospect of life after death

The brains of dead pigs have been restarted by scientists in an experiment which raises serious ethical and philosophical questions about what it means to be alive and the prospect of bringing people back from the dead.


https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1099-1
Puddleduck is offline  
Old 30-04-2019, 04:14   #165
Registered User
 
SailOar's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 619
Re: In The News

Rapid melting of the world's largest ice shelf linked to solar heat in the ocean
Quote:
An international team of scientists has found part of the world's largest ice shelf [Ross Ice Shelf] is melting 10 times faster than expected due to solar heating of the surrounding ocean....

"The stability of ice shelves is generally thought to be related to their exposure to warm deep ocean water, but we've found that solar heated surface water also plays a crucial role in melting ice shelves," said first author Dr. Craig Stewart from the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) in New Zealand....

"Previous studies have shown that when ice shelves collapse, the feeding glaciers can speed up by a factor or [sic] two or three," said co-author Dr. Poul Christoffersen from Cambridge's Scott Polar Research Institute. "The difference here is the sheer size of Ross Ice Shelf, which [sic] over one hundred times larger than the ice shelves we've already seen disappear."...

The findings suggest that conditions in the ice shelf cavity are more closely coupled with the surface ocean and atmosphere than previously assumed, implying that melt rates near the ice front will respond quickly to changes in the uppermost layer of the ocean.

"Climate change is likely to result in less sea ice, and higher surface ocean temperatures in the Ross Sea, suggesting that melt rates in this region will increase in the future," said Stewart.....
__________________

__________________
The greatest deception men suffer is their own opinions.
- Leonardo da Vinci -
SailOar is offline  
Closed Thread

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Good News / Bad News Alexei Monohull Sailboats 7 23-11-2009 03:09
good news/bad news in Bradenton Beach salty_dog_68 Product or Service Reviews & Evaluations 1 31-05-2008 22:01
FYI- News Artical -Fire Arms delmarrey Health, Safety & Related Gear 7 26-01-2004 23:48

Advertise Here


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:58.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.