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Old 03-01-2022, 10:07   #31
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Re: Transition plan to liveaboard and cruising

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Originally Posted by lo2jones View Post
I never understand the “get on a racing crew” to gain experience. 90% of racing crew are relegated to rail meat positions for at least a while. Most skipper owners drive the boat themselves regardless of whether they are a skilled helmsman or not. So, crew do learn about racing, but very few gain practical experience. I’ve know more than a few people who are good at racing (sailtrim, tactics, but bad a driving due to lack of practical experience.” I applaud the advice of doing a live aboard for 1-2 years prior to the big dive into the cruising boat that , you will eventually learn, suits your lifestyle and needs.
I invite a lot of women on sails and they often say something like they're an experienced X-year sailor on X number of different boats, but put them behind the wheel and it's like they just stepped foot on a sailboat for the first time. But don't get me wrong. I love racing! It's just that I race my own boats to gain the experience I knew I could not get on OPBs. My best friend had raced on Lake Erie for 10 years doing bow work before we started double handing and has a knack (and real enjoyment) for navigating, which she never did before. She also drives the boat much better than me in light wind.
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Old 03-01-2022, 11:20   #32
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Re: Transition plan to liveaboard and cruising

There is a guy who writes for flying magazine. Although he hasn't sailed the world he has done a lot of cruising. Maybe you can look him up
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Old 03-01-2022, 14:16   #33
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Re: Transition plan to liveaboard and cruising

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Hello.

I am a 51 yr old CA working at a US airline. My wife is a RN and floor supervisor at a major hospital. We are in the process of creating a 3-5 year plan to sell our home and transition to a cruising lifestyle with the end goal of having circumnavigated the globe (slowly) in our own S/V before hitting the rocking chairs on a porch (or dock) somewhere.

Ideally, what I am hoping to do is connect with other pilots who have realized this dream and who may post in this forum, although anyone’s well-intentioned and experienced advice is welcome and appreciated.

I’ve learned that the best way to realize one’s dreams is to work backwards from the end goal, identifying key milestones along the way. So, here is the goal...

Circumnavigate the world in a bluewater cat over a period of at least 5 years. Maybe twice, in order to visit...once again...friends and favorite spots discovered along the way.

A little about me, boats, and water....

I can whitewater canoe Class IV rapids, learned to sail at age 13, I chase redfish and speckled trout in my bay boat on weekends, and have owned a variety of power boats over the past 20 years. I am also a certified rescue diver and have scuba dived worldwide. I have been in, on, and around water my entire life. However, I have never owned a sailboat, nor do I have any real bluewater experience. This is on my bucket list, and the time has come to seriously engage in getting this checkmark.

The above all said, we are not the types to undertake a goal of this scale without a detailed, well thought-out, and researched plan. We intend to be experienced, licensed bluewater crusiers who are fully self-sufficient before we pull anchor for our first crossing alone. We will take classes, testing, and be licensed. Volunteer crew to build time and experience. Be able to troubleshoot and repair most systems on the boat short of major repairs.

We do have a general outline of our plan, and are well aware of many of the different considerations and necessities in order to realize our dream. This forum is indispensable and we are very grateful for it.

At present, we feel it would be wise to actually live aboard a boat in a marina for a year or two. Ideally, this would be in SE FL with easy access to the Bahamas. But that is likely far easier said than done. Right now accomplishing this part is the biggest challenge. We would spend that time learning how to live aboard a boat, sail her, maintain her, the written and unwritten rules of the cruising community, volunteer crewing, and networking.

So....where should (can?) we find a slip in SE FL? How should we go about that? Also, what kind of cat should we be looking at for this first phase?

I can commute to work out of Miami, and my wife can easily find a job with a hospital there. We’re empty-nesters so no kids with us to worry about. Right now we’re trying to bring together a plan to find a marina at which we can live aboard a boat as well as ID a good boat to begin with. Ultimately we are setting aside $1-2m for a 5 year all-inclusive budget...the boat we live aboard to start will not be the boat we begin the true adventure in. For the curious, I have my eye on the Outremer models.

Looking for advice and suggestions on how to get this first phase accomplished. Rather than posting specifics here, I request that interested parties send me an email. It is accessible through my profile.

That all said, “paying it forward” is a well-established and time-honored tradition in both professional aviation and the healthcare world and we promise to do so when and as the opportunity presents itself to help others. We look forward to the new friends we will meet on this journey and hope you might be one of them.

Thanks for reading and wishing everyone a safe, prosperous, and happy New Year!
Given your timeline and budget, I'd seriously consider having a blue water catamaran built. Most of them can be customized to your tastes but they all tend to come well outfitted with niceties like dishwashers, washing machines and watermakers for ease of living aboard as well as A/C systems for the tropics. First do some chartering. Since you're already in Florida, there are a world of chartering opportunities at your door step. This will give you a better idea of what you want to buy. If you decide to build one, it takes about two years from design to completion so you can't wait forever on this.
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Old 03-01-2022, 15:54   #34
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Re: Transition plan to liveaboard and cruising

Start sailing this month with friends or instructors. There are lots of great classes in wonderful locations taught by really fun sailors. Take advantage of them. If you hate overnight sails, or looking at blue water day after day after day, better to find out now than after you buy a $$$ boat.
Shop online for weekend and weeklong classes in Florida, the Bahamas, Tahiti or wherever on day sailors, cruisers and cruising catamarans. Instructors make it easy by handling all the logistics and their reputations depend on ensuring folks have a great time.
Having been a class IV kayaker, and sailed all varieties of boats for 40 years, I would bet you won’t find any boat more fun than a 16’ beach catamaran. World catamaran cruising is a lot more like RVing than beach cats or whitewater kayaking. You sleep and cook and clean and maintain and entertain on your dream boat and sail it once in a while.
Still, you won’t figure out what you like, or don’t like, until you try out options with those fun instructors. Don’t waste your money or your dreams on buying a big boat until you figure out what you like and don’t like on some one else’s boats. Focus on experiences, not plans. Good luck!
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Old 03-01-2022, 16:47   #35
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Re: Transition plan to liveaboard and cruising

Everyone assumed all the posters are in Florida or even on the east coast of the United states. The responses should be related to sailing in general unless the questions are asked about Florida specifically
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Old 03-01-2022, 17:06   #36
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Re: Transition plan to liveaboard and cruising

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Everyone assumed all the posters are in Florida or even on the east coast of the United states. The responses should be related to sailing in general unless the questions are asked about Florida specifically


Did you missed the original post? He actually wanted a boat in….FL

Oh well read the fine print or just the print
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Old 03-01-2022, 17:25   #37
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Re: Transition plan to liveaboard and cruising

Living aboard a boat in a marina while working a full time job is a vastly different lifestyle than that of endlessly cruising a sailboat from continent to continent. Maybe to need to crew on anothers sailboat on a longish trip to a remote location to see if you actually want and can do this --oh yes -be sure to take wife along on this test trip. Good Luck . (BTW- a decent live aboard slip in SE Florida costs a bunchie. (If you can find one.)
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Old 03-01-2022, 18:42   #38
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Re: Transition plan to liveaboard and cruising

Its funny. I’m in this forum a few times a week… and over the course of the last year or so this subject has come up so much that I am convinced there will soon be too few slips available for all the new ‘live aboards’ in places eople want to be!
This is going to be your biggest isse!
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Old 03-01-2022, 20:41   #39
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Re: Transition plan to liveaboard and cruising

Our plan: 25 year cop retiring in 4 months, currently “looking” at boat models in person now. Visiting a Navigator 44 this weekend. Still 4 years left before we r empty nesters then buying boat, moving aboard as we do America’s Great Loop learning the first year close to land, then off to the Bahamas and beyond. Working as yacht insurance agent along the way to fill the cruising kitty and to keep busy.

Living in a marina I think may get old after a while if you have nothing to stay occupied with. If living and cruising things will break need maintained thus learning along the way. Plenty of marinas here on the east coast of Florida central area. Great spot to commute to Orlando airport for work and a lot of hospitals too.

Good luck, keep us posted!,
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Old 03-01-2022, 21:24   #40
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Re: Transition plan to liveaboard and cruising

Tons of pilots who are sailors (I am one of them, and I just bought my new boat off another one)

I lived on my old boat in a marina for 5 years before I set off, refitting the boat, teaching myself how to sail, working full time still and doing lots of weekend trips interspersed with longer (month+) trips when I could get the time off work. It's a good way to get familiar with the boat you chose.

I guess my only question is, what made you decide on a cat? It's generally (not always!) harder to find slips for them, and the costs generally tend to be more. Not saying it's not the right decision for you, but it doesn't sound like you guys have even tried sailing a mono yet. And the feel of the boat heeling over on a glorious sunlight reach is hard to beat.
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Old 25-02-2022, 07:55   #41
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Re: Transition plan to liveaboard and cruising

2nd the advice to learn to sail by actually sailing. I spent a few seasons crewing w racing skippers. Turns out that I disliked racing BUT what an effective way to learn hard and soft sailing skills! Good luck!!
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