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Old 27-12-2016, 17:24   #46
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Re: The Trauma When a Foodie Goes Liveaboard

A good array of fishing rods, and a man to catch, kill and fillet.
Crab nets.

In the pantry: panko flakes, nori sheets, rice-wine vinegar, wasabi, eggs. We rarely run out of eggs, bacon, balsamic vinegar or mayonnaise. Herb garden is possible, but I've just been using green bags and zip lock bags to keep herbs and veggies fresh for a couple of weeks.

I miss the veggie patch, but fresh fish sure makes up for it.
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Old 27-12-2016, 17:42   #47
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Talking Re: The Trauma When a Foodie Goes Liveaboard

The only thing I gave up was the Kerig. I have one set of pans, slow cooker, pressure cooker, microwave, blender, toaster, 1 cookie sheet, 1 cake pan, 1 muffin tin, 1 bread pan. I cook fabulous meals and share with the live aboards. I have no glass on board! You'll find your own way. Have fun.
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Old 27-12-2016, 19:38   #48
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Re: The Trauma When a Foodie Goes Liveaboard

The biggest issue with the "best knives" on a boat is of course rust. The best sharpened knives are of course regular steel ones not the ss ones (no matter what the marketing hype tells you). So on a boat it will always be an extra effort to keep the good ones from rusting. Regular use and sharpening seem to accomplish a lot as far as keeping them rust free. And the fancy ss knives can be used when entertaining the guests. One big plus of good ole' non ss knives is that they can be purchased at yard sales for a buck or two and thus can be stocked up in decent quantities. But they do require vigilance and regular use to keep sharp.

IMO a good reliable knife to cooking is what a good reliable weapon is to soldiering. Everything else is ancillary.
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Old 27-12-2016, 20:06   #49
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Re: The Trauma When a Foodie Goes Liveaboard

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Scott - so I've been checking out sous vide cooking - seems like a good idea for cruising. They (the immersion circulators) seem to run 8-900 watts and I wonder how you power it.
They work fine off our Victron Inverter(s); remember that they have a very limited duty cycle (20%?) on the heating element assuming you have a well insulated water bath holder... we like a small Yeti cooler...
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Old 28-12-2016, 01:34   #50
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Re: The Trauma When a Foodie Goes Liveaboard

Hi to all sailing "foodies". Nothing goes better together when done right than good cruising and good eating. Good food keeps a happy boat.
I'm past trained as a baker and nothing is simpler and easier (and for lifting of the spirits) than fresh bake on a medium or longer passage. Ingredients are simple and easy dry stored. Beware - premixes don't work aboard. Right recipes are everything. Please have a "dutch oven/skillet" and or heavy pressure cooker to hand. I use both. Keep it simple and dry stored. Supliment with fresh whenever possible. I don't use any other gadget unknown from 1910. I do use knives, a manual conical (jam) purey sieve grinder and "chicken" shears (esp good on bigger fish).
Have fun cooking to a new situation. If Crew have worked hard they will generally be most appreciative and attentive to all your meals.
Let's chat more about boat cooking. Happy, tasty cruising for all. A
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Old 28-12-2016, 01:40   #51
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Re: The Trauma When a Foodie Goes Liveaboard

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Originally Posted by Island Time O25 View Post
The biggest issue with the "best knives" on a boat is of course rust. The best sharpened knives are of course regular steel ones not the ss ones (no matter what the marketing hype tells you). So on a boat it will always be an extra effort to keep the good ones from rusting. Regular use and sharpening seem to accomplish a lot as far as keeping them rust free. And the fancy ss knives can be used when entertaining the guests. One big plus of good ole' non ss knives is that they can be purchased at yard sales for a buck or two and thus can be stocked up in decent quantities. But they do require vigilance and regular use to keep sharp.

IMO a good reliable knife to cooking is what a good reliable weapon is to soldiering. Everything else is ancillary.
Try a ceramic knife, startlingly expensive, but never rust and takes years to go blunt.
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Old 28-12-2016, 02:43   #52
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Re: The Trauma When a Foodie Goes Liveaboard

Pardon me. My concession to "modernity in cooking" is 2 low tech stick in dial thermometers that I use to check inside temperature is ready /food safe. One is for sweets and the other is for meats. Cheers. A.
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Old 28-12-2016, 03:02   #53
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Re: The Trauma When a Foodie Goes Liveaboard

must read david Shallack mediterrean summer for staples list of a gourmet chef, we live in the winter in St Maartin and other french islands mainly for the food resources e. the bilge is a fantastic storage area. use green bags to greatly extend the life of fruits and veggies VIP. marinate meats to extend life. quik saute/stir fry/pressure cook/ but sourcing is of utmost importance, hence cruising within restocking distance of french islands, especially St Martin and Martinique, like shopping in Paris.
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Old 28-12-2016, 03:11   #54
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Re: The Trauma When a Foodie Goes Liveaboard

Quote: " the bilge is a fantastic storage area."

The part of TrentePieds' bilge used for veggies and fruit is known as "the root cellar"

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Old 28-12-2016, 03:27   #55
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Re: The Trauma When a Foodie Goes Liveaboard

adapt your skills to suit your new environment / rip top baked bean cans instead of traditional can opener types / most people seem relieved after they settle in / it's hard to have a long preparation gourmet meal when everything is moving around a lot / delicious fresh fish with legumes, lemon and your choice of condiments / wash up with salt water / write your own recipe book
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Old 28-12-2016, 04:21   #56
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Re: The Trauma When a Foodie Goes Liveaboard

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Try a ceramic knife, startlingly expensive, but never rust and takes years to go blunt.
Ceramics are handy for holding hot coffee. For all else, go with steel. It don't much mind if you drop it, or apply force when cutting.
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Old 28-12-2016, 04:24   #57
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Re: The Trauma When a Foodie Goes Liveaboard

Hi all. As an observation, history is loaded with so many more vessels that have failed more from poor eating, than really from poor weather and seas.
Now we have a better understanding of diet and health and the ways to keep good sailing spirit and endurance. Eat well and sail well, everyone at CF. Cheers, A
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Old 28-12-2016, 04:37   #58
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Re: The Trauma When a Foodie Goes Liveaboard

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Does manifold cookery refer to baking potatoes on your exhaust manifold? Because if so, I'm gonna have to add one more con to the outboard column in the never-ending inboard vs outboard debate ...
Ive had some great meals cooked on exhaust manifolds!
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Old 28-12-2016, 06:01   #59
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Re: The Trauma When a Foodie Goes Liveaboard

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Ive had some great meals cooked on exhaust manifolds!
Do tell! I have only ever baked potatoes. Do they make manifolds with a flat spot for Dutch ovens?
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Old 28-12-2016, 06:17   #60
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Re: The Trauma When a Foodie Goes Liveaboard

cooking in a 12v world is a bit different, but less so than you think. I enjoy good food too but all you really nead is a good couple of pots and a pan, a pressure cooker. a good chef's knife that keeps its edge (my fav is a $20 ikea chefs knife that really keeps its edge) and some assorted untensils. I dont really need all the gadgets I once had. Its less to clean and forces you to be efficient in the kitchen!
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